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Discussion Starter #1
If you notice, on most cars trucks and anything else that uses hydraulic equipment, that the reservoir that usually holds the pump, the fluid and what not, is positioned in a singularity area of the machine, and usually away from anything that might be effected by it.

when I was a kid, I used to want to ride with my dad when he was running bull dozer. It had a big tank next to the seat that seemed to be a really great seat. When hydraulic oil is pumped, it gets hot. Not quite hot enough to fry an egg but close.

On the Yamaha Venture Royales, the rear brake reservoir is positioned so close to the rear exhaust collector shield that you can't stick a phillips screwdriver through there. It has a level sensor that turns on an idiot light if you run low on fluid. It is also real close to the heat shield.
It's bound to get fairly hot in there!

Does anybody know how hot brake fluid can get before it fails?
The Venture was made for 16 years before it was replaced by the Star, but the problem that I am having is getting the master cylinder to pump up to pressure when I am bleeding it. maybe its cooked!
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Characteristics of common braking fluids[4][5]



Dry boiling point Wet boiling point Viscosity limit Primary constituent

DOT 2 190 °C (374 °F) 140 °C (284 °F) ? Castor oil/alcohol
DOT 3 205 °C (401 °F) 140 °C (284 °F) 1500 mm2/s Glycol Ether
DOT 4 230 °C (446 °F) 155 °C (311 °F) 1800 mm2/s Glycol Ether/Borate Ester
LHM+ 249 °C (480 °F) 249 °C (480 °F) 1200 mm2/s [6] Mineral Oil
DOT 5 260 °C (500 °F) 180 °C (356 °F) 900 mm2/s Silicone
DOT 5.1 260 °C (500 °F) 180 °C (356 °F) 900 mm2/s Glycol Ether/Borate Ester
 

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And those numbers are for fresh fluid; they go down rapidly with age, as the fluid soaks up water from the air (except for silicone), so change early and often!
 
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