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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the market for a cylinder hone. I see there are two types, ball and the three-legged stone type. I'll be using a hand drill, but a press is an option. Anybody with any experience know any reason why one type would be preferred over the other? 55.2mm bore, cast iron jug. I like the versatility of the stone hone and you can change grits easily.
 

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I use a stone to remove any scratches that can be gotten out without re-boring. The stone is better at taking off an even amount over the entire surface of the cylinder, and as you said, you can change grits easily and replace damaged stones. I use a ball hone only for re-hatching the walls after boring.
 

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Good call Eye.

Thats what they are for. A hone should never be used to repair a damaged cylinder, It is not strong enough to remove gouges or deep scratches in the cylinder walls., it is suggested that when the pistons are out, all the cylinders should be checked for out of round with inside mics, and honed. The ball hone is for hatching the walls after honing. If you are down for the big rebuild, you should record all the data, (block and blueprint) the entire engine. Check for line bore on the shaft after the main bearings are changed, because in the factory they sometimes have to remove flawed material in the block and install bearing spacers(nobody likes a floppy crank) good luck with your rebuild man, that is a great accomplishment!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input, fellas! I grabbed a little stone hone tool, then the next day came across a NOS 1mm overbore piston for it, so I got a recommendation for a local guy to bore it for me. Been two weeks, just called him today, and haven't heard back...starting to get nervous, but I know where he lives. The old piston was pretty scuffed, and there were visible lines in the jug, looked rather deep, so I think the bore was the way to go. I did check the bore for round, albeit with an old school pair of inside calipers, no dial or gauge, just the kind you adjust to fit the bore and turn it to see if it wiggles in different places. I still have one more engine to refresh, so my hone may not end up being a total waste of dough.
 
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