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Discussion Starter #1
What do you do about uneven lanes? Sometimes there is a three inch difference between one lane and another, just a vertical cliff for your bike either to ascent or fall off. What happens when you angle over one of these things at speed?

Do you just stay in your lane and avoid the bump? Do you cross at an acute angle? How do motorcyclists handle this?
 

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Moderator - Like a crazy cat lady but with bikes!
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Good question! I normally just hold my position unless I have to traverse the edge. And if I have to cross the edge I'll try to hit it with the most angle I can and with the clutch in. But even then I'm a little scared to do it when the edge is higher than the part of the lane I'm already in.
 

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Nightfly
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I've come across those situations numerous times and usually I will try to cross them at no greater than a 45 degree angle. But of course that is not always possible. I think it's best to relax and not become tense when negotiating that edge. I also try and give the bike just a bit of power, for me, pulling in the clutch gives away too much control. But that's what I do. Now if it's raining, that's another problem....
 

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American Legion Rider
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Seen an unusual amount of them this year with resurfaced roads. So got a lot of practice with them. Found it best to just pick which side you want to be on but the new was always more inviting. So if I wasn't in that lane I'd get just as far wide as possible then dive back in as close to perpenticular as possible which usually is in the 45º area. But just staying put works well too until you are forced to make a change. Look at it as just another bump in the road or like railroad crossings. Getting as close to perpendicular as possible works best. Let the bike do the work.
 

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Depends on the depth and unevenness. If not too bad, the squiggle can have its moments. i just let the bike squiggle. Some tires seem to be more affected. Same with the suspension. Yami seems to be the worst with the 401? Dunlops. If the unevenness is bad, I take them at more of an angle.
I nearly lost the plot when crossing three sets of railway tracks on my way to the docks in Liverpool. Was following a guy on a Rickman Matese framed bike. He did fine. My new Isolastic squiggle mobile nearly smeared me on the pavement. Crossed them at around 45 degree angle.

Noddy does not seem to like a smooth stretch of highway on the big island. It may be the top box that is causing it. I need to do more tests. Not much affects the Suzuki. The joy of quality suspension. I am currently reading a book by Andrew Trevitt called Sportbike Suspension Tuning. I like it.

UK
 

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Ace Tuner
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What do you do about uneven lanes? Sometimes there is a three inch difference between one lane and another, just a vertical cliff for your bike either to ascent or fall off. What happens when you angle over one of these things at speed?

Do you just stay in your lane and avoid the bump? Do you cross at an acute angle? How do motorcyclists handle this?
What happens when you angle over one of these things at speed?

Like UK said, a squiggle. :smile_big:
Bike size and tire size have a lot to do with it. Generally the smaller the bike the more effected.
Even at speed you want to cross it at as much of an angle as you can.
You should be able to ride your way out of it by just committing to a line / path that crosses the 'cliff' even if conditions are such that you have to cross back over it from the other side right away.
When that happens just commit to a line that crosses it again and go. The idea is, don't ride the cliff, cross it.
The bike will dance a little... Can be kinda fun. :surprise:

Do you cross at an acute angle?

Yes, or as close to straight across as conditions and speed will allow.
 

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A wheelie works.

Moving down the road at 60 MPH I doubt you can actually get an acute angle or a 45 degree and you may be confined by traffic limiting maneuverability. The best would be closer to 20 degrees. Most of the time the motorcycle just wiggles, the other than most of the time, I guess we bust our arses.
 

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Biker
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Yep, that is what Dave Hough says in Proficient motorcycling, What can make it worse is being directed to move to
a different lane by traffic cones which might not be at an acute or sharp angle.

Something that maybe similar is you are on an entrance
ramp to the Hi-way, there is a barricade of sorts, cement barriers, well after the barriers are the white V lines that are
indicating you get into the lane at the end or point, some of those lines could be raised cement painted white and it might
not be easy to see the depth of them so skimming along at 60 and brushing up against what ya think is flat white lines is
so gonna 'F' up your day.

I never would have thought of that being done, thus, the greatness in reading up on our sport of riding.
 

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Nightfly
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At some point you have to quit worrying about what you were told or what you think you were taught. Rely on your riding ability. Things pop up unexpectedly, road surface changes quickly. You are able to adjust and ride on or you will crash. I don't give a damn what somebody said I should do in a video or book, when it happens, you must react. Most times your choices will never be what you would like them to be. Deal with it and remember it for the experience you gain.
 

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At some point you have to quit worrying about what you were told or what you think you were taught. Rely on your riding ability. Things pop up unexpectedly, road surface changes quickly. You are able to adjust and ride on or you will crash. I don't give a damn what somebody said I should do in a video or book, when it happens, you must react. Most times your choices will never be what you would like them to be. Deal with it and remember it for the experience you gain.
Speaks from experience, leaving some jean material imbedded in the asphalt and a scuffed up GSXR near Johanniskreuz, Germany.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I can tell you what not to do:

1. Freeze
2. Stare at the ledge between lane
3. Tense up
 

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I can tell you what not to do:

1. Freeze
2. Stare at the ledge between lane
3. Tense up
Beer helps with all 3. But it is not politically correct to mention it these days. We did not have youtube or videos or any of the modern stuff. At the track it was one on one discussion, with the more experienced helping the less experienced. Now all the new riders know everything from watching videos. That is a generalization. You learn about it in your human relations course.
Beer also helps with the drama of the chair lift on the ski hill. I will be doing more research at tonight's darts games.

UK
 

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Stay in your lane if you can.
If you can't stay, cut over then back, get as much angle as you can on it, then cross it hard and upright, not leaning, and not tense. You'll feel some weirdness and a wiggle or two, but nothing bad has ever happened to me crossing a zillion of these, both up and down, they did a lot of paving this year.
Down is pretty much a non event, up can be a bit tougher.
 

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Something that maybe similar is you are on an entrance
ramp to the Hi-way, there is a barricade of sorts, cement barriers, well after the barriers are the white V lines that are
indicating you get into the lane at the end or point, some of those lines could be raised cement painted white and it might
not be easy to see the depth of them so skimming along at 60 and brushing up against what ya think is flat white lines is
so gonna 'F' up your day.
And those painted white V lines are very slick when they're wet from rain.
 

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There's a lot of great comments here which I think already have you covered.

Not reacting to it or staring at it helped me the most. I had it as a regular part of my commute for a while. Maybe I was cheating as I was on a dual sport with tons of suspension to react to just about anything.

I'm better off riding like it's not there than driving like it is. You see, my first time on one was pretty scary, because I tensed up and tried to tell the motorcycle what to do. When I just planned on where I was going and not worrying about what it was doing, it went a lot smoother.

Yes, don't lean into it, ride like you're just continuing down that lane and between a little natural reaction and the force of those 2 wheels spinning, you'll get through it.

When I reacted to it, I felt like it spit me into the next lane and I had a hard time not hitting another car, but when I was chill and let it happen I was able to just use a little adjustment to stay in my lane.
 

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I actually have no issues with them as long as the gravel stuff is swept up. I have more issues in my semi than I do the Blackbird. Not saying I never had issues but one year in Denver, when I was riding there back and forth commuting I had to get used to it or stop riding. It was that same year one of them rocks hit me in the visor (HGC at that time it was new and dated same year 2010) and shattered it. So now one could say I have a bit of PTSD in gravel and roadways, but uneven pavement no issues.
 

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There's an old one lane, wooden suspension bridge down at Beaver, Arkansas. I don't know if there's any two boards bolted down at the same heigth. Granted, there's no deviations of three inches, but riding across that bridge you can feel the bike constantly wiggling back and forth.

It's kind of fun! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Not reacting to it or staring at it helped me the most. I had it as a regular part of my commute for a while. Maybe I was cheating as I was on a dual sport with tons of suspension to react to just about anything.

I'm better off riding like it's not there than driving like it is. You see, my first time on one was pretty scary, because I tensed up and tried to tell the motorcycle what to do. When I just planned on where I was going and not worrying about what it was doing, it went a lot smoother.

Yes, don't lean into it, ride like you're just continuing down that lane and between a little natural reaction and the force of those 2 wheels spinning, you'll get through it.

When I reacted to it, I felt like it spit me into the next lane and I had a hard time not hitting another car, but when I was chill and let it happen I was able to just use a little adjustment to stay in my lane.
Great comment. I'll do this. Makes me feel a lot more confident about this category of hazard.
 

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What about if you're crossing when you're riding while your right leg is in a full cast from the hip down, it's raining, and you have thirteen chickens in a coop strapped on your passenger seat? :devil:

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
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What about if you're crossing when you're riding while your right leg is in a full cast from the hip down, it's raining, and you have thirteen chickens in a coop strapped on your passenger seat? :devil:

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Gee, Ron, I should think everyone on the forum would know exactly what to do. You just reach into your cast and pull out your kazoo. (You do stash a kazoo in your casts, right? RIGHT?) Blow on the Kazoo to agitate the chickens so they flap their wings and carry you over the uneven lane.

Easy peasy! :biggrin:
 
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