Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

Now that my new bike is running well, I'm replacing all the consumables that need to be replaced and doing a final run through of all other components.

I saw some dry rot on my front tire but I'm not sure if it needs to be replaced. There is only a little bit of cracking on the edge side-wall on about 30% of one-side of the tire. The rest of that side and the other side of the tire is completely fine.

I'm probably going to replace the tire anyway but I was wondering what is the "limit" when it comes to dry rot, if there is any at all?

Here are some photos of the cracking. http://imgur.com/a/5cdni#yVXZ3

What do you guys think?

Thanks,
Tim

PS Here she is naked. http://imgur.com/a/Adu4U
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I will probably just play it safe and replace. Just trying to educate myself, ya know?

Would you replace it because it need it or because you're a belt and suspenders kind of guy?
 

·
Certified Homeless Biker
Joined
·
2,556 Posts
Trials and errors. I'd say it depends on the operators, how aggressive they ride. I'd replace them.

Though it's odd that the dry rot is on the wall. Mine's alway on the middle of the tires (where they contact the ground the most)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
According to the Bridgestone rep, at a Honda parts/accessories seminar I attended years ago, as long as you can not see the belts in the cracks the tire is safe that way. The only other concern is more with the tread itself. If it is truely age cracks I'd be thinking the tread compound may become too hard due to loss of the preservatives that are in the compound that stops both cracking and hardening.

I get smaller cracks in the tread and sidewall on my dual sport within a year or so, but no worries, I'm usually through the tire by then. My tread cracking is probably more due to the bike being in the sun a lot, so I know it isn't pure aging from time. The tread is still pretty darn sticky for hard riding.
 

·
Malevolent Savant
Joined
·
2,088 Posts
I've had worse cracks on some cars tires and the vehicle still passed a state inspection. Are the "cracks" more important to keep an eye on a motorcycle than on a cage?
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,857 Posts
Yup. If you blow a tire on a car you've got three more to keep you from falling over. :)

And the laws very from state to state. In NC that tire wouldn't pass. In FL I don't think we even HAVE inspections.


I've had worse cracks on some cars tires and the vehicle still passed a state inspection. Are the "cracks" more important to keep an eye on a motorcycle than on a cage?
 

·
The Rainmaker
Joined
·
502 Posts
Do you have a tire store that you deal with regularly?
I have a good independent tire store in my area that doesn't try to sell me anything I don't need.
I would go to someplace like that and get their opinion on the tires in question. Personally, I think I would replace them.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,294 Posts
According to the Bridgestone rep, at a Honda parts/accessories seminar I attended years ago, as long as you can not see the belts in the cracks the tire is safe that way. The only other concern is more with the tread itself. If it is truely age cracks I'd be thinking the tread compound may become too hard due to loss of the preservatives that are in the compound that stops both cracking and hardening.

I get smaller cracks in the tread and sidewall on my dual sport within a year or so, but no worries, I'm usually through the tire by then. My tread cracking is probably more due to the bike being in the sun a lot, so I know it isn't pure aging from time. The tread is still pretty darn sticky for hard riding.
Yep once that compound becomes too hard then you start to slip on the curves...that is why even though the dealership said I could possibly get about another 1K out of them, I chose to replace the front also. The dry rot was from sitting in the garage of the person I bought the bike from, they just sat there too long.
 

·
Veteran Member
Joined
·
3,275 Posts
Here's my take on it. A failed car tire leaves you stranded, at least temporarily, on the side of the road. A failed motorcycle tire may leave you injured or dead. I don't mess around with cycle tires. If in any doubt, replace. While many people focus on the catastrophic failure part of this scenario, don't forget that a tire that is cracked means the rubber compound is drying out. This severely reduces available grip, even if the tire does not blow out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hey guys,

thanks for all the responses. If I purchased the tire new less than a year ago and everything felt fine, i might have risked it. But this is a new bike that I have been working on and after some more research, the tire is from the tenth week of 2001!

Definitely not taking chances with that. Ordering a replacement soon.

Rear tire was just replaced by previous owner in mid-2010
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Hey guys,

thanks for all the responses. If I purchased the tire new less than a year ago and everything felt fine, i might have risked it. But this is a new bike that I have been working on and after some more research, the tire is from the tenth week of 2001!

Definitely not taking chances with that. Ordering a replacement soon.

Rear tire was just replaced by previous owner in mid-2010
Good on you. My question is simple, at what speed would you like for your front tire to blow out? I did the same thing with my 1100, after buying it I rode thinking that I would get new tires in a couple weeks. I was running 85-90 mph on the interstate with a buddy when my rear went down. I didn't go down but had to clean my shorts by the time I got it stopped. That was almost a year ago and I am still having anxiety when running on the interstate. If you ever have nay doubts as to a tires viability, replace it.
 

·
Malevolent Savant
Joined
·
2,088 Posts
On my tires & inner tubes, I have no idea how old they are and will be replacing them as soon as I can. That said, I know I will be riding on these tires for testing purposes up & down my street, once I get the engine to turn over.
------------ -------------

I am assuming you do, BUT do you need to balance motorcycle tires?
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,857 Posts
It's a good idea to check the balance, yeap.


On my tires & inner tubes, I have no idea how old they are and will be replacing them as soon as I can. That said, I know I will be riding on these tires for testing purposes up & down my street, once I get the engine to turn over.
------------ -------------

I am assuming you do, BUT do you need to balance motorcycle tires?
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,857 Posts
"My question is simple, at what speed would you like for your front tire to blow out? "

That's a great way to put it. (And I'll be stealing that line at some point in the future.) I had the same thing happen...in about 1979 I was trying to get a little more use out of a tire that I knew was bad but didn't have the money to replace. It blew on the Interstate, parts came off the rim and locked up the back end, and we went down at maybe 60 mph. My girlfriend at the time suffered a de-gloving amputation to her right hand and lower forearm. I don't take any chances with tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Hey guys,

thanks for all the responses. If I purchased the tire new less than a year ago and everything felt fine, i might have risked it. But this is a new bike that I have been working on and after some more research, the tire is from the tenth week of 2001!
Dump it. Sane limit for a bike tire is MAYBE five or six years with good care. However, if it sits out in the sun much the tires will rot pretty fast. If I see cracking rubber, the tires get replaced.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top