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It’s supposed to be beautiful today. In the 80’s. However, it’s supposed to be windy. 15-30mph winds. How many of you will ride on a windy day? What do you consider too windy? J
 

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Depends on the size of the bike. If I'm on the 250cc scooter, that 15-30 would be my limit. If I'm on the Goldwing I could take a stronger wind. I mean, it wouldn't be fun, but I could do it.
 
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I'd ride.
 
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I get more concerned about gusty winds than sustained wind unless the sustained wind is really high, like over 45 mph. My Goldwing handles the wind pretty well, but there is always a danger such as when you are in a relatively protected area and then emerge into the open where the wind can suddenly hit you. Riding with a strong cross wind can be very tiring, but I have found that if I lean the bike slightly into the wind, but keep my body fully upright, it is not as tiring as using my body strength to hold the bike into the lean. Riding on a windy day is just not much fun, so if it is already windy, even just 20 to 25 mph, I probably would not take the bike out, but if I were away from home and needed to get back, that much wind would not stop me.
 

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Most cruisers are not really affected by wind much. I find in strong winds the biggest issue is the wind trying to rip the helmet off my head. (full face)
The old 1500 goldwings are awful in the wind and anything over 40mph is pretty tough. The GL1800 is better but I would say 50mph is my limit especially going head on into the wind.

In general 45 is OK as a high end.

Mine is a reverse trike so it's much better than the two wheeler version
 

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8 of us fools rode from Midland to Wichita Falls a few years ago in 45 with gusts to 60mph(according to local news) in a dust storm. It was not fun at all. Sometimes you do what you have to do but we all agree we should have got a motel room and waited a day. I think 30mph is plenty. But guess what it was yesterday when I rode? Yep, same kind of wind as that Midland ride. Just not for as long.
 
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40 is a windy day. 60 will blow you over. 60 is when the wind starts to shriek.
Best to walk your bicycle in 60 than ride it. A motorcycle is survivable, but best limit the maximum to 45 as the others have said.

The large fairing and window on the Triumph, is the worst at some wind angles. Naked bikes have more drag, and can be better. But wind angle will decide.

On an open causeway, a medium size car can get lift off at 60. Stationary cars will rock. VW vans should be chained down. In North East England, they chain down the caravans in the camp grounds ( RV trailers )

If you were wondering. We can sail upwind in 40. Much more and we turn around, and go downwind. Big sail boats can go upwind in 60.

UK
 

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I find 15-20 mph annoying but tolerable. Anything over 25 or so takes the fun out of the ride. I can't imagine being out there in 40-60 mph wind!
 
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15-30 is windy but not a big deal, we see that all the time. 30-40 is where it gets interesting, especially if it's gusty out that takes a lot of concentration and takes a lot of fun out of the ride, but it's doable. I've ridden home from work many times in this kind of weather, and once for about 8 hours across one of the plains/ Midwest states, I think it was Minnesota, though it might have been Iowa, either way it was a constant 30+ all day, I actually had a wear pattern on one side of my tires at the end of the day.
Bridges and structures near the road can be interesting on days like this, I was riding around lake Erie one really WINDY day and suddenly found myself on the Buffalo Skyway, which is about 150 feet high, curved, has low sides and often closes in windy weather..I had no idea it was even there till I saw it, and with a semi coming up behind me at 80 mph slowing down or having him pass seemed like a poor choice, so it was gun it and go... Everything went fine but there was a definite pucker factor that day :)
 
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15-30 is windy but not a big deal, we see that all the time. 30-40 is where it gets interesting, especially if it's gusty out that takes a lot of concentration and takes a lot of fun out of the ride, but it's doable. I've ridden home from work many times in this kind of weather, and once for about 8 hours across one of the plains/ Midwest states, I think it was Minnesota, though it might have been Iowa, either way it was a constant 30+ all day, I actually had a wear pattern on one side of my tires at the end of the day.
Bridges and structures near the road can be interesting on days like this, I was riding around lake Erie one really WINDY day and suddenly found myself on the Buffalo Skyway, which is about 150 feet high, curved, has low sides and often closes in windy weather..I had no idea it was even there till I saw it, and with a semi coming up behind me at 80 mph slowing down or having him pass seemed like a poor choice, so it was gun it and go... Everything went fine but there was a definite pucker factor that day :)
Folks may scoff at that and question it but it's true. You can see the results of riding all day if you don't have too many curves. Arizona gets me every time.
 
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If you were wondering. We can sail upwind in 40. Much more and we turn around, and go downwind. Big sail boats can go upwind in 60.
UK
Yikes! Not sure what is a big sail boat to you, but on a production-built 40 foot charter boat, much more than 20 and I am reefing. Over about 30 and I am looking for the dock/shelter/waterside burger joint. Sustained winds of about 30 on a popular brand of production catamaran caused several of the lugs to pup out of the mast. If we'd been on an overnight passage, we might have lost that sail. (As it was, we only needed to cross about 50 miles of open water and we arrived in time to tie up, fix the boat, and go out for beers. :grin:)

As for motorcycles, my wife's BMW G310R is lightweight and relatively tall, so it reacts strongly to sidewinds. She has to work a lot harder even in 15 of wind. My Harley, on the other hand, has a really low center of gravity and weighs well over 700 pounds. Wind doesn't seem to be a big deal on that bike, at last in the 25-30 range. Never been out in more than that.
 

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My limit is 20. I do not feel comfortable at all on my Honda Shadow Phantom in that kind of wind. I don't like it.
 

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Good answer!

Unless you just worked 12 hours and would really like to get home for dinner...



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Today it looked pretty windy outside, and the weather app said the wind was steady at 20 and gusting to 28. There was also a little bit of spitting rain from some dark clouds headed our way. This looked like a perfect chance to go ride in some wind, so off I went.

I rode about 25 miles at speeds up to about 55. I made a deliberate effort to travel in different directions and along big roads where trees would not block the wind. I could tell there was a lot of wind because of the noise it makes on the helmet. Also, sometimes the wind would push my helmet to the side a little bit, or blow on my pants in a strange direction because it was coming from sideways. Sometimes the rain drops would move sideways off the visor, all in one direction, which indicates a strong side wind. So there was definitely wind.

At least at these wind speeds, though, the bike didn't seem to notice. The bike did not move around in the lane or demonstrate any untoward behavior. It was not necessary to lean or compensate for the wind in any way. It was a pretty normal and enjoyable ride.

The bike is a 2018 Harley Davidson Heritage 114. It weighs a lot, about 740 pounds. The center of gravity is very low, and the wheelbase is pretty long (63 inches, I think). It also has a nice big windscreen with a wind deflector on top (got to add some ADV style to the Harley hahaha). These factors would seem to play a big role in how a bike responds to wind. The same ride on my wife's small BMW might have been a very different experience.

The takeaway, for me, is that winds at least up to 28mph are a non-event for my bike and need not influence the decision to ride.
 

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Strong winds have never kept my from riding. But if is more fatiguing and will generally shorten the length/duration of a ride.
I was riding back from the Black Hills once in 40-50 mph crosswinds, I had planned to ride from Rapid City up to Pierre and then on to Spirit Lake. IA. Instead, I took more breaks and only made it as far as Chamberlain, exhausted and ready for a steak and a beer...and a pillow
 

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I don't think I've ever not ridden due to wind but will admit I prefer less wind. Hail fire and brimstone (whatever that is) now that's a different story.
 
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