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Visionary
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Discussion Starter #1
It amazes me how little some bikes get used, you read ads for used bikes with only a few thousand miles, but it never really sunk in until yesterday when I hit 16,000 miles and thought about it a bit.

I can't seem to stop riding , and the winter shutdown when I can't extend my season any longer is going to be very tough on me..I'm dreading it already, it's going to be a problem. I don't think my bike's previous owner had the same problem...I bought my 2008 Vstar 650 the last week of May, with just under 8000 miles, yesterday it rolled over 16,000 miles. So I rode more in 6 months than the original owner rode in 6 years.

Considering that I spent all of June and part of July practicing and getting my license before I took any long rides (I probably only rode 500 miles the first 6 or 7 weeks) I really rode most of that in 4 months.... I think I may have developed a serious addiction here.
:71baldboy:
 

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American Legion Rider
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23,543 Posts
I've seen how little some get used myself recently test riding new bikes. I saw a near new Harley Electra Glide in the used lot of a Indian dealer. Bike was a 2012 with 4,430 something miles. That's crazy. Why buy and expensive bike like that and let it sit, then trade it for a newer bike? That's what the guy did. Dealer said the guy was so upside down on the bike it was a stupid trade but that's what he wanted. Pure stupidity.
 

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Really, especially with expensive bikes, the owner's more than likely view them as TOYS, to be played with only when they feel like it. A means to an end.

That describes me now, at this stage in life: I'm 68 years old and own a business where I normally work 50 to 70 hours per week and then come home to my Agri-Farm, attend to due diligence there, finish mow 7 acres every week from Early march until November, go to Church Sunday and Sunday evenings and sometimes on Wednesday evening and take care of Charitable volunteer work in the community:biggrin:

I ride 12 miles to work and 12 miles back, when I can. I still manage to put about 4,000 miles each on my normally 2 bikes I own, currently a 2012 Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster and a 2012 Burgman 650 Executive Maxi-scooter. My last Mini-vacation was a 1,600 mile round trip to the "Dragon," and it took me 3 days roundtrip on my new then 2012 Goldwing.

When someone else paid me, I took 3 weeks every year and toured all over this country on my bikes or in my Motorhome. Being self employed limits ones ability to just take off.

I am very sad about this Toys meager existence though. In 2002 I bought a new Bass Boat, all decked out and I LOVE to fish! I was retired and could do basically anything I wanted to do BUT--- I bought an Electronics business for my Son, thinking that He and his in the future Wife would take it over but it never happened until Aug 17, 2015, when He got married! From the time I bought the business and we expanded it to be a very successful one, I used that Bass boat for 7 hours total as shown on the hour meter! POOR BOAT:biggrin:

So, this is my typical, long winded diatribe about me and some of the rest of us where life's responsibilities keep us from racking up the miles like some of you:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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You need to recognize that people buy bikes for many reasons. While you and I and others on this forum buy a bike so that we can ride, there are many, many folks out there who buy a bike as a "lifestyle statement". Riding is secondary, and may actually be something the owner of the bike is uncomfortable doing or frightened of doing, but he likes the image of himself as a "biker".

Years ago I had a next door neighbor, a well educated engineer, who would routinely come over to see me when I was getting my bike out of the garage. He would talk about buying a motorcycle incessantly and then finally bought a new Harley Sportster. He also apparently gave away or threw away all of his pre-bike clothing since from the moment he bought the Harley I never again saw him wearing anything but Harley logo clothing. And I mean everything, from shirts, to jeans to jackets, to hats, to gloves and boots and probably his underwear and socks as well. Over a year after he bought the Sportster he told me that he was thinking of trading the bike in for a larger Harley, and that he was offered a great trade-in value since his bike had only 300 miles on the odometer after having it for a year.

Around here you can drive past a bar on a beautiful summer or fall day and see bikes parked in front of the bar and sitting there for most if not all of the day. Riding is secondary to some of these bike owners. A short ride to the bar and then sitting around with similar minded faux riders is their idea of a great day obviously.

If I were ever to buy a used bike, that's the type of bike I would be most interested in. Probably kept as clean as could be, and hardly ridden. I wouldn't be surprised if a good percentage of bikes fall into this category.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Personally I think people buy too much bike in many cases and as a result never ride much. According to the salesman I talked to about that 2012 EGU, the owner traded for a Scout and the bike is back in already for a 5k service. I have no reason not to believe the salesman and that would support my theory on at least one case.
 

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This "BAR," thing is so stereotypical and myopic and "Bikeophobic" (I just made that up:p0 and just plain "Racist" (Why not the word is the rage!) against the old, fat and 'part time riders' and disabled Folks that want to socialize with others over a fine glass of Soda or iced tea:biggrin:

Do we treat the same Folks that park their Bale spear pickup trucks by the hundreds that are at a Bar or Café, in Farm Country? Do we "TIME" how long they fill a bar stool on a given day like we apparently do our fellow riders?

Why the judgement? Just smile and be happy!

You can't judge a book by it's cover:wink:

I wish I rode my bike 100 miles to work daily to make the Hero's list! (Not-not and not:p)

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Gone
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Quite a few buy a motorcycle before they even know how to ride one. A decent percentage of my riding students already own a motorcycle before they take their first class. Many have no idea how to do even the basic operation at that point.

My guess is that for many it is an impulse buy that isn't researched beforehand. Riding turns out to not be what they imagined, and they don't ride much if at all.
 

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Veteran Member
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There are a lot of people out there that buy a bike and just don't ride it for whatever reason. But sometime there are legitimate excuses. My 2007 Ultra only had 8800 miles when I bought it this past August. The previous owner had medical issues arise shortly after buying it, so it sat mostly unused until I came along to buy it. He desperately wanted to ride it, just couldn't. A trike is in his future now. Wife and I put 2500 miles on it since August 29th.

That leads me to other reason bikes might have low mileage. I have three other bikes. I love each for thier own reasons. But with four bikes spreading out seat time, limited available riding time, and a company vehicle for commuting, mileage doesn't rack up on them quite so fast. My 2006 Sportster accrued 12,000 miles the first year I had it, commuting my butt to college after I left the military. It's since only added 5000 more.
 

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Your SORE butt:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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Drywall Repairs...

I suspect a lot of successful people just ASSUME they'll be able to go out and purchase a large cruiser and, without training or a lifetime of riding experience assume they'll be successful riding it. After all, it LOOKS easy. How hard could it be?

And then they scare themselves, drop it, or nearly get creamed by an inattentive motorist. Suddenly the fun of "ownership" is gone. Bike either sits or gets traded.

Not unlike all the MD's who bought Beech Bonanzas (the infamous "V-tail doctor killer"and augered in...assuming if they were successful at something as difficult as medicine, they could be successful at anything -- finance, flying, landlording...

I "sort of" did the same thing but in the sport bike arena, purchasing a CBR929 mostly because "I like how it looked!" Waay too much bike for my skill level, I discovered AS I rode it. Uncomfortable for long trips.

Young people are at somewhat of an advantage over us old farts with their quicker reflexes, greater strength, better vision, etc. Most of them CAN get on a smaller Ninja and learn as they go, although there will be some testosterone casualties.

It's clearly not motoring along at 65 (or even 100mph) that takes any skill. It's pushing a 800# bike out of a garage or parking space, so-called "ground handling", tight U-turns, etc. that require experience with a bike. And working your way up from lighter bikes to HEAVY ones is how you do it without incident.

So time after time noobs ask us what bike to buy as their first bike, insistent on a R6 or GSX or something beyond their skill level, and successful old farts go out and buy a big HD without asking anyone. My buddy bought one and didn't even have the skills to ride it home. HD was happy to deliver it.

After punching it through the garage wall he sold it.

The used bike market thus offers some tremendous, low-mileage values.
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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768 Posts
I'm a low mileage rider. I guess its the curse of having many other interests and obligations as well. While I do love riding, I ride when I have extra time from doing the other things I enjoy just as much. :)
 

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Nightfly
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I agree CTX, I too am a low mileage rider. There are too many things going on in my life to spend those precious hours of free time putting miles on my bike. Nor is it of greater importance than most things in my life. I travel a lot, I don't have time to get the bike out on every nice day just because it's a nice day. Most of us have priorities and we live our life accordingly. I keep my bikes for long periods of time, I don't normally trade them in on next years model. And unlike most on this forum I don't take long rides, just not my style. Short, quick, high intense rides is my preferred mode of riding. It's my thing, do what I want to do.
 

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I understand why some people are low mileage riders, but I love to ride every chance I get. I purchased my current bike on July 21st of this year and I've already put 3,400+ miles on it, so I'm on track to do about 10k per year at this rate, after adjusting for fewer miles during the winter. Notice I said fewer... not zero! :)
 

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Visionary
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Discussion Starter #14
Some interesting replies here, I was thinking mostly along the lines of people that have the bikes and just don't bother using them, but I see a lot more comments are about wanting to ride but not having time to ride all that often for just recreation, having to divide valuable free time between various pastimes.
I guess I have some of that issue too and it limits the weekend and longer trips that we take to a few a year , but I do have the 'advantage' of a long commute, and since I was able to replace the car with the bike for that on any decent weather day I get in a lot of my riding without taking up more of the valuable 'free' time that's left over. Of course if I didn't have the commute in the first place I'd have more time..but that's another discussion.
 

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I understand why some people are low mileage riders, but I love to ride every chance I get. I purchased my current bike on July 21st of this year and I've already put 3,400+ miles on it, so I'm on track to do about 10k per year at this rate, after adjusting for fewer miles during the winter. Notice I said fewer... not zero! :)
Nope, you're a low mileage kinda guy. Bought mine July 2nd, 6,300 miles. :biggrin:
 

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Some people use a motorcycle as an alternate means of transportation, using it weather permitting when they NEED to go somewhere.

For some that doesn't rack up many miles.......I live 1.5-2 miles from work(depending on route), 1 mile to gas station, grocery store, hospital...........sure glad I'm not one of those people.
 

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Right you are! I was out riding with a friend over the weekend, we did about 150 miles or so, mostly on back roads. We stopped briefly at a small country store and the clerk had a small Honda parked there. We asked her how long she'd had it and how many miles she had on it.

She said she bought it nine months ago, and it had just over 1,000 miles on it. "I usually just ride it to work here and back home, it's about a mile or so each way."

Some people use a motorcycle as an alternate means of transportation, using it weather permitting when they NEED to go somewhere.

For some that doesn't rack up many miles.......I live 1.5-2 miles from work(depending on route), 1 mile to gas station, grocery store, hospital...........sure glad I'm not one of those people.
 

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The 43rd Poser
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There is a fine line somewhere... I need to find it.

When I bought my bike, up until now, I didn't have time to ride, due to work.

I only put 20,000 on my Ultra Limited in the 2 years I've owned it.

Now I have plenty of TIME to ride, but no money.... being unemployed sucks.
 

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Being unemployed DOES suck! I hope your job search is successful very soon.

20,000 miles in two years is more than many, if not most, put on their bikes.

There is a fine line somewhere... I need to find it.

When I bought my bike, up until now, I didn't have time to ride, due to work.

I only put 20,000 on my Ultra Limited in the 2 years I've owned it.

Now I have plenty of TIME to ride, but no money.... being unemployed sucks.
 

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94 miles today and I feel accomplished! I took the Burgman because it has a good fairing, leg protection, hand protection and fantastic upper body wind protection with an aftermarket "Clearview" screen. It was cold when I started so the Triumph got left at home.:p

The highlight of the day was when I spotted a Bald Eagle, in a tree, surveying his Kingdom and when he turned approvingly to look at me as I slowly rode below him. I'm sure we made eye contact:biggrin:

72 degrees right now in November:)

Sam:coffeescreen:
 
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