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On The Road Again!
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I'll save the $3500 and buy fuel. At this point in my life, the stock engine has plenty of power for me.
Since you brought it up, I've been seeing all of his videos about all the modifications he's made to that bike, and the thought occurred to me....Why does a brand new bike need all of those "improvements"?
My Goldwing is 20 years old with 99,000 miles and it STILL doesn't need any improvements.
In fact, there are none of those mods even available for it because it was perfect when it came from the factory. I was thinking that maybe it's because his is an American bike....Then I remembered that my Goldwing is an American bike too, built in Marysville Ohio. LOL!!!
 

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I can remember many years ago, a guy I worked for was talking to me about the car I owned back then. I had a Chevelle SS. From the factory it came with the 396 big block, I replaced that engine with a 427 I had rebuilt with a few after market parts for even more HP. The suspension was not all stock either. All that power had to get to the ground. So bigger tires, wheels, stiffer shocks, ladder bars, all the stuff I needed to be faster than the next guy from one light to the next. Except living in the country, we had a quarter mile marked off on a nice piece of highway.

This guy was asking me why I would do all that, make it ride rougher, and I still could only do 55 MPH? I don't remember what I told him, but it was what I did and the guys I hung out with did. (Plus a little illegal drag racing with bets on the side.) It was fun.

Point is, that's what I did with cars in my younger days. Other people do it with motorcycles. It don't have to make sense to anyone else.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I believe he has a sponsorship and is showcasing mods available. That is just my take, as no one can afford all the changes that have been on his bikes.
 

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Nightfly
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I can remember many years ago, a guy I worked for was talking to me about the car I owned back then. I had a Chevelle SS. From the factory it came with the 396 big block, I replaced that engine with a 427 I had rebuilt with a few after market parts for even more HP. The suspension was not all stock either. All that power had to get to the ground. So bigger tires, wheels, stiffer shocks, ladder bars, all the stuff I needed to be faster than the next guy from one light to the next. Except living in the country, we had a quarter mile marked off on a nice piece of highway.

This guy was asking me why I would do all that, make it ride rougher, and I still could only do 55 MPH? I don't remember what I told him, but it was what I did and the guys I hung out with did. (Plus a little illegal drag racing with bets on the side.) It was fun.

Point is, that's what I did with cars in my younger days. Other people do it with motorcycles. It don't have to make sense to anyone else.
I'm with ya on that retired guy. I grew up and got my license at the beginning of the performance car era. Car's were not called muscle cars back then, they were just the latest from the factory. I had many high performance cars and couldn't wait to make improvements to make them faster. Those who don't get that never had the fever. Some guys were content to ride around in their stock 289 225 horsepower mustang and that was all they wanted. Me, there was never enough power to be had. Street racing was big in those days. Heck the real Hemi cars were just hitting the street in 65 and things really got crazy. (yeah I know, the 426 Hemi came out in 64 but purely for racing) I've been doing the same with my Sportster and I don't need to explain my wants and needs to anybody, it's what I do and what I enjoy, I don't ride for distance, I ride for relief, for a kick in the backside you can't get from a a Goldwing. I am not putting them down, good machine. But just because some are built here doesn't qualify them as American made. Would you call Mercedes or BMW cars that are built here American made? They are German designed, tested and approved by Germans, they just happen to strike a deal here that benefits their bottom line. Same with the Japanese bikes.

Enjoy the bike you ride, that's as it should be. But far too many Americans love to put their home built bikes down, and pontificate about what they deem are the better bikes made in another country. I've been on this forum a long time and have never denigrated another brand of bike. But oh how the many love to curse and demean the Harley. We all can't like and appreciate the same motorcycle and most look for something specific from their ride that trips their trigger, whatever that may be. I'm a drag racer at heart and love surprising people. That works for me....
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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TR - my parents neighbor was a county cop. He got an unmarked 64 Plymouth Fury III Police Interceptor with one of those 426 hemi's in it. We used to go on un-official "ride along's" That thing was freaky fast
 

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If I only knew what some of those cars I had would be worth today, I wouldn't have drove the h..., fire out of them back then. (And I would have tried harder to get a 440 'Cuda I really wanted at one time.)
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I really wanted a 383 sixpack Road runner, but didn't have 3700 dollars :(
 

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On The Road Again!
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I was always a bit different. I never cared one bit about drag racing.
For me, it was always the tight curves on the twistiest roads.
My first three cars were European sports cars, low on horsepower but
big on handling the twisty back roads. First was a Karman Ghia, then
a Triumph TR-3, and finally an MGB.
They all took a while to get rolling, but once I hit the curves, it was goodbye
to whoever was behind me. Back in the 60s and 70s, most American cars
didn't handle curves well at all, unlike what they make today.
Nobody could catch me in the MGB once I headed into twisty back roads.
 

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Nightfly
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should not be a second post
TR - my parents neighbor was a county cop. He got an unmarked 64 Plymouth Fury III Police Interceptor with one of those 426 hemi's in it. We used to go on un-official "ride along's" That thing was freaky fast
Not to argue John but I know of no cop car that ever came with a Hemi from the factory. And police never bought the high end model. The Hemi was just to intensive to keep running. Police didn't want to adjust solid lifter and keep the carbs tuned. Maybe your friend installed the hemi himself. Most Hemi cars I came across back in the day never ran as they should. Guys who bought them did not know how to tune them so they took them to the dealer for service and those guys didn't have a clue. But the few I know that were in more than capable hands, screamed like no other.

The 383 was never available with a six pack, you would have had to buy the 440 engine. In 1970 Plymouth came out with the AAR Cuda and Dodge had the Challenger TA. Both had 340 cubic inch engines with a six pack. All hemi engines from the beginning of the run to the end all came with twin carbs. Race hemi engines most always used Holley carbs, just a better carb for racing use. Almost all street hemi engines came with either twin Carter AFB or AVS carburetors.

In 63/64 engineers were also working with the Holley 770 CFM carburetors, and when they got the Holley carbs working even better than the Carter carbs, Holley became the staple carb for the remainder of the 1964 and 1965 race hemi drag package cars.

Heck I'm a Chevy guy, I shouldn't be telling you this stuff...
 

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I had a Mustang GT that was pretty good on a crooked road, of course it would never go around a corner twice the same way. That was always fun.
 

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Nightfly
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I had a Mustang GT that was pretty good on a crooked road, of course it would never go around a corner twice the same way. That was always fun.
My brother had a 1967 Mustang GT with the 390 engine and 4 speed. For a front heavy car it didn't handle that poorly. It looked exactly like the bullet car but was a year prior to that one. Bullet car was a 68. Tires were pretty lame back in those days.
 
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