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Discussion Starter #1
For anyone owning one, I'd like your input. The retro look I really like, and I'm wondering if Italy is still making fine crafted machines like they used to.
On a 1-10 scale for overall satisfaction? :)
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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Have heard the Moto Guzzi V-7 is a sweet ride.. Only know of one from real experience who originally planned on getting a first run Indian Scout but got impatient waiting and put his deposit towards the MG V-7 and loves it .. Somewhere may find an owner or two of them on this forum .. Suggest do a bit of searching and find out all you can about them before spending any money on something might regret later ..
 

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I recently test rode a 2017 V7 III Special with 4500 miles on it, for sale nearby -- and I am drooling over it! If I can only close a pending real estate sale before it gets sold...
Hope you snag it! How did it shift, brake, handle, power up, etc?
 

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Hope you snag it! How did it shift, brake, handle, power up, etc?
First of all -- it looks the way a bike should look, to my eye. Those cylinder heads poking out in front of your knees look gnarly beyond description. Gigantic (5.5 gals., I think) yet narrow gas tank means a long ride between fuel stops, and your knees don't feel spraddled-out. Blipping the throttle when stopped makes the whole bike torque underneath you -- but get rolling and shift thru the gears and all you feel is the awesome pull. Shifting was smooth and positive -- no searching around for neutral at all, very manageable clutch. It handled like a light bike (which compared to some others of the same displacement, it is), really felt as agile as my Honda CBR300R. There was bodacious torque all the way through the gearbox. I spent only a brief time on the Interstate, but even from 70 in high gear a roll-on instantly accelerated me beyond 80 -- where I backed off with the power feeling like it was still building, it not being my bike, after all. Comfortable, upright riding position, but the seat is long enough and flat enough that sliding my butt back a bit was easy and allowed a forward lean that felt very comfortable at speed. There's nothing to impede shifting your rear around to avoid fatigue on long rides, and if numb-butt does start to creep in the footpegs and handlebar are positioned where you can easily stand for a bit and take a break. Brakes -- simply awesome, smooth and progressive, they'll haul you down right quick with no drama. And without a towering pillion, even an old man with a bum hip (me) can swing his leg up and over getting on and off, something that is a challenge for me with many other machines .

Had I cash in hand the day I rode it there is no question I would have bought it immediately.
 

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I don't have a MG V7, but I do have a 16 MG Griso 1200, and I've test ridden a couple of Griso's before buying one, I've also ridden the V7, the Eldorado and the Stelvo. First, all Moto Guzzi's back in the day were built very heavy duty, and I mean that in a good way, and they are still built heavy duty. I probably should use the word overbuilt instead. If you test ride one, probably the one thing that will stand out is the transmission, they were always known as agricultural, tractor like (heavy duty overbuilt). They do shift smoothly and easily, but they are clunky (make a clunk when shifting) its normal.

As mentioned previously, the riding ergonomics are nice and comfortable and the V7 is light and agile, it maneuvers well. Its not a powerhouse bike, but it has enough for any situation. Its a very fun ride that handles the curves & twisties well, and you cant beat the great looking retro design of that bike. I did the curves on the test ride and it was really fun, even more fun than with my Griso with twice the power. Its also the only 750cc bike available with basically maintenance free shaft drive, a big plus for me. Another big plus is the price point, where else can you get a high quality shaft drive great looking retro bike new for $8000, or even less with a left over 2018 model.

Fortunately I have a Guzzi dealer in my town, so I get by there pretty often. As I've gotten older, I've gone to lighter bikes for the obvious reasons. I really love the color combination and looks of the V7 III Special in black and green. They have so many different iterations of the V7, its hard to choose a favorite. Last time I was in, my dealer has one like the one pictured below ( V7 III Special), I just couldn't take my eyes or my ass off of it. Since I recently purchased a 2nd bike, I couldnt justify owning three unless I dumped one. I just don't ride enough anymore to own three bike, (unless I want it there just to look at its beauty and ride every once in a while :grin:)

 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't have a MG V7, but I do have a 16 MG Griso 1200, and I've test ridden a couple of Griso's before buying one, I've also ridden the V7, the Eldorado and the Stelvo. First, all Moto Guzzi's back in the day were built very heavy duty, and I mean that in a good way, and they are still built heavy duty. I probably should use the word overbuilt instead. If you test ride one, probably the one thing that will stand out is the transmission, they were always known as agricultural, tractor like (heavy duty overbuilt). They do shift smoothly and easily, but they are clunky (make a clunk when shifting) its normal.

As mentioned previously, the riding ergonomics are nice and comfortable and the V7 is light and agile, it maneuvers well. Its not a powerhouse bike, but it has enough for any situation. Its a very fun ride that handles the curves & twisties well, and you cant beat the great looking retro design of that bike. I did the curves on the test ride and it was really fun, even more fun than with my Griso with twice the power. Its also the only 750cc bike available with basically maintenance free shaft drive, a big plus for me. Another big plus is the price point, where else can you get a high quality shaft drive great looking retro bike new for $8000, or even less with a left over 2018 model.

Fortunately I have a Guzzi dealer in my town, so I get by there pretty often. As I've gotten older, I've gone to lighter bikes for the obvious reasons. I really love the color combination and looks of the V7 III Special in black and green. They have so many different iterations of the V7, its hard to choose a favorite. Last time I was in, my dealer has one like the one pictured below ( V7 III Special), I just couldn't take my eyes or my ass off of it. Since I recently purchased a 2nd bike, I couldnt justify owning three unless I dumped one. I just don't ride enough anymore to own three bike, (unless I want it there just to look at its beauty and ride every once in a while :grin:)

That's fine looking bike! I'm not too fond of blacked out engines though (my age showing there). Not sure if MG produces one.
 

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I like the V7 and the newer V9, in Bobber and Standard.

The late model V7, with the 6 speed, huge tank and single throttle body injection, shaft drive and easily adjustable valves, sticking out on the end of those beautiful JUGS, has enticed me to own one for years------but, the nearest dealer is 150 miles away! I may never need the dealer anyway but it still bugs me, MG having so few dealers Nationwide.

The new V9's have a much smaller fuel tank but supposedly go the same distance as the V7's do. They also have more HP and torque but the small Gootzie's have never been known for performance as that is left to the full size bikes.

I fit really well on the new V9's. especially the bobber:)

Sam
 

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We wuz talking about them today at the bike gang meeting. I rode an original V7 in 1970 or 71. Sweet bike. They are basically the same today. There are a couple on my Island. One of them had problems with the fuel mixture and the pipes and mufflers turned blue. Does not look good. They are a reasonable price, and probably still a sweet bike.

Many of the guys have early models. they mentioned that the Lemans is not comfortable. Lots of old 850 s. The early ones with a drum brake took forever to stop. 180 feet from 60. Some disagreed with me on this. they were wrong.
Guzzis have an appeal like no other. Park it, and folks will stop and chat. Could be me.

UK
 

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I never ride, but read about this bike. Here a review of Alison.

"I've done just over 2,500 miles and really enjoy a long ride so luggage is essential. I wanted something to suit the bike and which didn't cost a fortune so I was thrilled to get these Dirt Sacks. They retail for £99 and one bag was enough for me for a weekend."
Wise people say ride your bike your way. So I do, with a smile.
- Alison R, 2018
 

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I wuz wundering if D Dubja meant to say " I have never riden a V7 Guzzi " but instead said " I never ride " and the missing bit of I never ride one, or wot I just said above is implied. I says this because he is in Bangladesh. His gramma may be good, but without some liner notes, we can only guess.
So DW, please inform us. Do now, or have you riden a motorcycle?

UK
 

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UK
[/QUOTE]
I wuz wundering if D Dubja meant to say " I have never riden a V7 Guzzi " but instead said " I never ride " and the missing bit of I never ride one, or wot I just said above is implied. I says this because he is in Bangladesh. His gramma may be good, but without some liner notes, we can only guess.
So DW, please inform us. Do now, or have you riden a motorcycle?

UK
Yes, sorry for my mistake. But I actually mean that, I have never riden a V7 Guzzi.
 
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