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Vintage Rider
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can't believe how dead this vintage forum is getting so it's time for a little history lesson from the mid sixties. So I did a little photo shoot of some Honda's from my collection.

By the later part of 1963, Honda’s engineers knew they needed a model to bridge the power gap between their 50 cc models and the next step up, which were the twin cylinder 125’s and 150 cc’s. So they decided to build a bike around the sturdy and reliable push rod motors which had served the company well since 1958. Having 30% more HP than the 50’s, this new model called a C200, was introduced in September of 1963. It would be a street version and the big brother to the C110 sport 50. Other variations would soon follow including the CM90 step through model (a more grown up C100) which debuted at the Tokyo Motor Show in October of 1964. This model, however was never imported to the US. And then finally the CT200 Trail model was unveiled in May of 1964 offering more grunt for climbing hills and off road adventure than the C105T.

So I decided to post a trio of Honda 90's from '64 &'65. In this group are the three variations in which the "Iron Head" 90's were marketed. Actual cc's was 87 and they were also referred to as push rod motors which had OHV's.

I finally had a chance to get them all out together. Since I’m beginning to get bikes ready for winter, it gives me a chance to put together these related groupings. But not before a quick ride followed by draining the fuel and then an oil change. Then after pulling batteries, it’s time for a little fun photographing them. Some of you may remember I posted a grouping of early Trail bikes last fall and also a post of “Commuter” bikes this spring from each of the Big Four Japanese manufacturers.
Leading the pack and first in line is my black 1965 CA200 followed by the blue 1964 CM90 and bringing up the rear is one of my red 1965 CT200’s


After the success of the 50 - 55cc earlier trail bikes, Honda quickly realized that a little more grunt was needed. So utilizing the same design characteristics, including a push rod engine, they upsized the complete bike, including engine to provide more torque (30%) and carrying capabilities of 450 lbs. So with its introduction, in May of '64, the CT200 became the first Honda with the "T" stamped in the frame, unlike the earlier C100T's and C105T's. Thus indicating it was to be a Trail bike from the beginning of assembly, and not just a parts modification of the CA200 street bike.After the success of the 50 - 55cc earlier trail bikes, Honda quickly realized that a little more grunt was needed. So utilizing the same design characteristics, including a pushrod engine, they upsized the complete bike, including engine to provide more torque (30%) and carrying capabilities of 450 lbs. So with its introduction, in May of '64, the CT200 became the first Honda with the "T" stamped in the frame, unlike the earlier C100T's and C105T's. Thus indicating it was to be a Trail bike from the beginning of assembly, and not just a parts modification of the CA200 street bike.


The 68 tooth trail sprockets on the CT200 were used in the overlay position, but when not in use they could conveniently be stowed away on the tabs attached to the hub carrier. There was now no need to remove the wheel to take off an overlay sprocket.


On the right we have the CA200 street version of the OHV 90's. Some people call these "90 Dreams" also, due to their resemblance to the "Benly's" and larger "Dreams" of the era.
The original push rod engine had 87cc's, but this one is pushing just over 99 cc's. Its engine has been modified to compete at Bonneville. Note the more aggressive tread which would provide better traction and control on the salt at the "flats". Just haven't found time to put it back to the original configuration, plus it's more fun riding it this way, knowing it will out run those pesky S90's. LOL


The CM90, being a domestic model, that debuted in Oct of 1964, has working turn signals as well as a couple of unique reflectors on the leg shield, that are clear and seen on both sides. Horn grill covers, being different on all three, state that the bikes are 90's.


A photo op in the backyard.
Although the engines are nearly identical on these models, the clutch and transmissions are different. The CT200 being a 4 speed with an auto clutch, the CM90 is a equipped with the 3 speed auto clutch that people are familiar with from the early cubs (C100 & C102's) Only the CA200 is running a 4 speed with manual clutch. Neutral position on top and four gears down.


Gathered around the fire pit!
Up front here is the CM90, which is basically an upsized C100 Cub. This model wasn't imported in the States, so is a rare find here. This one has a "born on date" of November 11, 1964 and was sold new in Japan. Not in the picture, but I also has an original Honda "buddy" seat that attaches to the rack with no need for tools.
 

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On The Road Again!
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My very first bike was a '64 C200, white, with a luggage rack on the back.
Should have kept that one.
But being young, broke, and eager to move up to something bigger, I sold it to finance the upgrade to a 305 Dream.
 

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Very Nice you are probably theclosest person we have to Jay Leno we have on this forum!
 

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Can't believe how dead this vintage forum is getting so it's time for a little history lesson from the mid sixties. So I did a little photo shoot of some Honda's from my collection.

By the later part of 1963, Honda’s engineers knew they needed a model to bridge the power gap between their 50 cc models and the next step up, which were the twin cylinder 125’s and 150 cc’s. So they decided to build a bike around the sturdy and reliable push rod motors which had served the company well since 1958. Having 30% more HP than the 50’s, this new model called a C200, was introduced in September of 1963. It would be a street version and the big brother to the C110 sport 50. Other variations would soon follow including the CM90 step through model (a more grown up C100) which debuted at the Tokyo Motor Show in October of 1964. This model, however was never imported to the US. And then finally the CT200 Trail model was unveiled in May of 1964 offering more grunt for climbing hills and off road adventure than the C105T.

So I decided to post a trio of Honda 90's from '64 &'65. In this group are the three variations in which the "Iron Head" 90's were marketed. Actual cc's was 87 and they were also referred to as push rod motors which had OHV's.

I finally had a chance to get them all out together. Since I’m beginning to get bikes ready for winter, it gives me a chance to put together these related groupings. But not before a quick ride followed by draining the fuel and then an oil change. Then after pulling batteries, it’s time for a little fun photographing them. Some of you may remember I posted a grouping of early Trail bikes last fall and also a post of “Commuter” bikes this spring from each of the Big Four Japanese manufacturers.
Leading the pack and first in line is my black 1965 CA200 followed by the blue 1964 CM90 and bringing up the rear is one of my red 1965 CT200’s


After the success of the 50 - 55cc earlier trail bikes, Honda quickly realized that a little more grunt was needed. So utilizing the same design characteristics, including a push rod engine, they upsized the complete bike, including engine to provide more torque (30%) and carrying capabilities of 450 lbs. So with its introduction, in May of '64, the CT200 became the first Honda with the "T" stamped in the frame, unlike the earlier C100T's and C105T's. Thus indicating it was to be a Trail bike from the beginning of assembly, and not just a parts modification of the CA200 street bike.After the success of the 50 - 55cc earlier trail bikes, Honda quickly realized that a little more grunt was needed. So utilizing the same design characteristics, including a pushrod engine, they upsized the complete bike, including engine to provide more torque (30%) and carrying capabilities of 450 lbs. So with its introduction, in May of '64, the CT200 became the first Honda with the "T" stamped in the frame, unlike the earlier C100T's and C105T's. Thus indicating it was to be a Trail bike from the beginning of assembly, and not just a parts modification of the CA200 street bike.


The 68 tooth trail sprockets on the CT200 were used in the overlay position, but when not in use they could conveniently be stowed away on the tabs attached to the hub carrier. There was now no need to remove the wheel to take off an overlay sprocket.


On the right we have the CA200 street version of the OHV 90's. Some people call these "90 Dreams" also, due to their resemblance to the "Benly's" and larger "Dreams" of the era.
The original push rod engine had 87cc's, but this one is pushing just over 99 cc's. Its engine has been modified to compete at Bonneville. Note the more aggressive tread which would provide better traction and control on the salt at the "flats". Just haven't found time to put it back to the original configuration, plus it's more fun riding it this way, knowing it will out run those pesky S90's. LOL


The CM90, being a domestic model, that debuted in Oct of 1964, has working turn signals as well as a couple of unique reflectors on the leg shield, that are clear and seen on both sides. Horn grill covers, being different on all three, state that the bikes are 90's.


A photo op in the backyard.
Although the engines are nearly identical on these models, the clutch and transmissions are different. The CT200 being a 4 speed with an auto clutch, the CM90 is a equipped with the 3 speed auto clutch that people are familiar with from the early cubs (C100 & C102's) Only the CA200 is running a 4 speed with manual clutch. Neutral position on top and four gears down.


Gathered around the fire pit!
Up front here is the CM90, which is basically an upsized C100 Cub. This model wasn't imported in the States, so is a rare find here. This one has a "born on date" of November 11, 1964 and was sold new in Japan. Not in the picture, but I also has an original Honda "buddy" seat that attaches to the rack with no need for tools.
Hi
Interesting Article
I am in Australia and not sure if you could assist.
I have a Honda CD 90 which I am trying to determine more information i.e build date etc. Chassis number CD90Y190960. I have attached some photos.
Any assistance would be appreciated
Thanks
Tony
 

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Vintage Rider
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First let me say that the CD90 was never exported to the USA, but there are parts on that bike that could help determine the approximate date of build. The frame appears to be the same as the US model CA200 which was discontinued in 1965, however many bikes continued to be sold in other global markets. If you can get to the wiring harness, it will have a year on it (white tag) that let's you know when the harness was manufactured by Sumitomo Electrics LTD. however this date is generally 6 mo to a year prior to the bikes build date. In other words if the the year is 1967 it will likely be a 1967 or 1968 build. Just looking at the bike, I can tell that the taillight was made in 1967 for use on late '67 and '68 models. The engine head is late '66 or newer. My best guess is the bike was built in late 1967 or 1968, but most likely a 1968 CD90.
 

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First let me say that the CD90 was never exported to the USA, but there are parts on that bike that could help determine the approximate date of build. The frame appears to be the same as the US model CA200 which was discontinued in 1965, however many bikes continued to be sold in other global markets. If you can get to the wiring harness, it will have a year on it (white tag) that let's you know when the harness was manufactured by Sumitomo Electrics LTD. however this date is generally 6 mo to a year prior to the bikes build date. In other words if the the year is 1967 it will likely be a 1967 or 1968 build. Just looking at the bike, I can tell that the taillight was made in 1967 for use on late '67 and '68 models. The engine head is late '66 or newer. My best guess is the bike was built in late 1967 or 1968, but most likely a 1968 CD90.
Thanks for the info
 
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