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Stopped by my neighbor Jason to remove the Gas tank and carb from this 2002 Honda Shadow Sabre VT1100 so that both the tank and carb could be serviced. Honda is not my forte, but I've worked on a few so I should be ok. Naturally we drain the tank, and its easy to tell that there is gas rot in the system. With that completed, two bolts removed and the tank comes right up, removing one small line in the back, after planning for a good place to put it.

Took a break for a moment to take a look at the condition of the petcock, and it was horrid. This meant a new one since it was leaking and the tank was filled with varnish, so we will revisit with kerosene later. Looking at the connector pod everything seems ok and will be addressed later.

The disassembly begins to remove the carb and everything has to be done in the right order as there is little room to work. Starting with the over flow tank, and then the intake manifold. Disconnecting non essentials like spark plug wires also helps. The enrichener connections were a disappointment, in my opinion could have been designed better. Yamaha wins on that one for sure. Noticing a small air filter that has disintegrated, i'd removed from the top of the carb was a tell-tale sign of problems to come.

The removal of the rubber hoses were done with care as they were not easy to remove, a purging process will have to be done for the fuel system once the carb is removed to get all of the garbage out of the lines. The throttle cables showed that the chrome caps for the heads required removal in order to gain access. Not a big deal but worth mentioning. Furthermore the bracket that holds all of the cables onto the carb was also helpful.

Finally, the carbs are unscrewed from the lower manifold so that it can be torsioned out of the rubber tubes. More chrome would need to be removed to rotate and pull the carbs clean out from the right side of the frame. Immediately, The lower manifolds will be cleaned and oiled and packed with paper towel so that nothing gets into the engine. The carbs will now be rebuilt and the tank will be serviced.





This is the first in a two part series on the complete disassembly, cleaning and reassembly of my dual Keihin CV carbs for the Shadow VT-1100. It goes into much much much detail. The first observation is that there is no easy way to separate the two carbs so this will be done as a single unit keeping the components separate and doing one side at a time. Again, fitted tools are important to not strip out screws. Starting from the top the cover for the main jet's needle diaphragm is removed to expose the diaphragm and needle which is removed and put off to the side. An observation shows some sort of significant contamination on the top side.

Next is the side spring loaded diaphragm, also contaminated and removed off to the side as a separate group. This brings the operation to the bowl cover which is loosened and removed from the carb. Surprisingly, the bottom of the carb didn't look to bad, the opposite of what I expected. Next, all jets and emulsion tubes are removed from the carb and put off to the side. The values of the jets are recorded. Also a visual inspection is done to see if any of the jets were physically blocked. With all of that removed finally, the float and needle come out.

Next the Mixture screw is turned in to get the count of its position to full stop and then drawn out. it is put with the rest of the brass after recording the value [3].

With that the first side is completely stripped after removing a few more small parts, I move to the next side. Same procedure. On the second side one jet is found to be completely clogged. Turns recorded on the second side [4]

Now with the carb completely stripped an inspection is done and a visit to Jason to determine the cause of corruption is due to a failed filter that fits on the carb.

At this point the entire carb is cleaned with carb cleaner and blown out with air through each port as well as the outer surfaces. With the carb itself cleaned, The individual parts are now attended to. This included mating surfaces. polishing of jets, emulsion tubes, the bottom of the bowl and the complete cleaning and servicing of the needle of the main jet and associated diaphragm.

The rubber from the diaphragm is then lightly oiled and the the excess is removed.






MORE OF THE REBUILD IN PART 2.....
 

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Continuing, on I work on the Brass, which is polished, to include needles, emulsion tubes and jets. They are further blown out with air, and look brand new.

With this, assembly is started on the first side with the float and needle. This is followed by emulsion tubes and jets. The idle needle also goes in to full seat with the spring washer and o ring. It is then drawn out the correct amount of turns.

After this the diaphragm for the main jet is introduced. This required some creativity with a paper towel to hold it in the ideal position so it would not pull allowing for the cover to be put on correctly. This probably had to do with some shrinking of the rubber.

Now, the same cleaning procedure is conducted on the other side, as the procedure was completed the rebuild kits had arrived, which changed up things a bit, which included the re-use of the side diaphragms. They were cleaned and that portion was reinstalled on both sides. This included the oval o ring from the kit. That complete assembly is reinstalled on the carb.

Since new float needles came with the kit I went back and removed the old ones and put in the new ones, It required some double effort but was worth it. While working with the bowls, the covers had the old gaskets removed, cleaned up, and new ones installed.

The plastic pieces for the top air filter also has o-rings that need to be replaced, after which they are installed, same thing for the bowl drains. All O rings are lightly lubricated before assembly.

Lastly the idle mixture screws are removed again just to receive new O rings and are then reinstalled to the correct turns. With this the carb cleaning and rebuild is done, and the unit is ready to go back onto the bike.


 

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In this video The Keihin carbs that were rebuilt for this bike are now reinstalled following a specific order. The tank is prepped beforehand as it needed to be cleaned out for a few days with kerosene.

Starting with the cleaning of the needles for the enrichner circuit. Im not very fond of this design by any means as compared to the Yamaha VSTAR setup. There are several quirks with this system on that note. After removing the paper towels the carb is reinserted in a rolling fashion as demonstrated and seated in the rubber manifolds. Remoil is used for all of these rubber seatings throughout the video. Attention should be noticed to the keys that hold the seals into position.

Now the enrichner needled are screwed back in carefully. They are cheap plastic so they require care in doing this , without tools.

My standard technique with the spare tank is used to purge the fuel lines using a drill bit to plug one line. The fuel that came out of the system running the electric pump was nasty. Two sessions were done 5 minutes apart until I was sure it was completely purged. At that point the fuel lines could be reconnected, the left one required special attention to ensure it didn't kink. The air hose is connected to the center of the carb.

A new filter is added into the top filter unit of the carb after all of the plastic and piping is cleaned out. Apparently this is done every 12,000 miles, I bet there are a lot of bikes with the original system, long since turned to dust, still in place.

This is followed by the linkages which are added along with the bracket. This was followed by the top manifold and then the coolant tank.

With that the bike was turned on and tested, though without an exhaust system, it can not be set up or balanced. That will have to wait for the next video.



 
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