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Discussion Starter #1
What type of Tire irons do you recommend. Mine were useless
Installing new front tire and poked holes in tube while installing . Need to buy new tube. Used Harbor Freight tire iron(useless) and other tools like screwdriver which was not a good idea.

The old one was easy to get off but the new tire is hard. The tire is half way on ( one side), then I put in tube, then pry tire in. Its in correct direction and aligned with tire red dot/stem for balance. Used lubricant. The correct iron should help me so no holes.


Trick to get on without making a hole beside correct tools.

Thank You
 

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Gone.
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I have one from Dennis Weaver and one from Harbor Freight and both work about equally as well. The HF is a little longer and can bend if you really crank down on it, but I've never popped a tube with it.

Also, it's a little easier on the fingers if you put the tube on first, then seat one half the tire, then tuck in the tube, and then seat the other half of the tire.
 

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Tyre irons

I put one bead on first, then the tube, then some air in the tube, then the last bead. Never pinched a tube. Got to be sure the opposite side of tyre is down and in towards the middle of the rim, to be able to crank the last bit of the bead over. Put in enough air for the tube to take shape, not enough to restrict getting on the last bead.

Years ago the ISDT required guys to remove and replace the rear tyre on their bikes, in 15 minutes I think. With the tools they carried with them.
They used locking tabs back then.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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I've mounted 250 tires with the cheap HF tire irons and rim protectors with no problem. The only tube type I've mounted were on my little Honda 360, I would rather mount 250 tubeless tires any day.
 

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Tube it.

I've mounted 250 tires with the cheap HF tire irons and rim protectors with no problem. The only tube type I've mounted were on my little Honda 360, I would rather mount 250 tubeless tires any day.
I would rather pump up a tyre with a tube in the middle of nowhere.
Agreed tubeless is easier and saves time, except for the pumping up.
I have had my tyre irons for so long, who knows what brand they are.
But there might be a name stamped on them.
The majority of the tyres i have changed, have been on dirt bikes, and pavement race bikes.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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So what were you doing wrong?
 

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[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Three-Curve-Motorcycle-Lever-Changing/dp/B005DHY1XW[/ame]

I am not the greatest at tire changing,but these spoons make it much easier. The finish is a bit rough so I used a belt sander to polish the ends up and they work great. I have one that i use with another spoon ,but have often wished for two.

You did ask for a recommendation, so here is one from a guy who is by no means a skilled tire man. The page I pasted gives you options on how many you want in case three is too many.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Tire Irons

Thanks for the link on tire irons but I also needed to fill the tube with air partially so it may be tucked into the tire so the tube will not be punctured by the tire irons. Like my old boss said mistakes happen, learn from it and just don't do it twice.
 

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Echo

Thanks for the link on tire irons but I also needed to fill the tube with air partially so it may be tucked into the tire so the tube will not be punctured by the tire irons. Like my old boss said mistakes happen, learn from it and just don't do it twice.
Do I hear an echo here, from post number three? Seems that swell Crusty guy mentioned putting some air in the tube.
Some days my talents get glossed over.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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He was poking holes in his tube. :)
Thank you Captain obvious. I was wondering if he knew what he was doing to cause the punctures. Might help someone else.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Finally Complete with my tires tube install- Honda Shadow

Finally installed my cruiser tires after going through some tubes I pinched and some learning. Added a procedure based upon feedback from others on this site. See what you think.

Installing - Metzler 888 Tires, Dunlop Tubes OEM, Honda Shadow 2003 600, 45,000 miles, Spoke chrome rims
( Not going into removing tires from bike)

Tools - Stubby tire tools, HF tire irons, baby powder, tire bead soap, rubber hammer

1. Placed some baby powder on tube. This helps prevent pinching since less friction.

2. Install one side of tire on rim which is easy, then install tube and insert nipple into hole. Do not tighten nut on nipple fully since you are installing the tire. Lubricate tire bead with tire soap.

3. Fill tube partially to help push tube away from rim to minimize pinching and work out kinks.

4. Used Stubby tire tools for installing rim to prevent pinched tubes. I broke one and they replaced it free. Nice people. For my rear tire the stubby worked fine but toward the end needed the HF tire iron for last push since could feel stubby bending. Used front with Stubby with no problems.

Make sure the red dot on tire is aligned with nipple for balancing. Per Metzler 888 tire only.

HF irons can work fine alone also but prefer the stubbies.

5. I held one stubby in place and just moved the other around the tire( used a rubber hammer at times to push it along). Follow stubby directions and backoff if you feel it bending. It will crack.

6. Keep opposite side of bead you are installing on top dead center of rim to help ease in bead. Many articles on this and why you do it. It also helps to place the old tire under the new to keep everything in place.


7. Fill tire up fully and tighten nipple nut.

8. Will be using lead fish weight (sculptured it to fit ) on my spokes with HF balancer. Fish weights are $4.00 for 10 large lead sinkers at Walmart. The ones they sell can be a couple bucks a piece. Both are just a hunk of lead.

It's snowing today. Still need to wait some before I get out.
 
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