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Discussion Starter #1
Ok...I'm sick of these gass prices. I got a van to be practical because I work and have worked for dog kennels where I needed to tote dogs around all the time. WIll my van eats up a lot of gas.

I have always wanted a motorcycle and I have a few questions about the Honda Rebel.

How is it on gas?

Can you take it on the interstate?

Is there a better beginner bike?

Is this a bike I would want for years to come?

Will it do my taxes?

How much is the average insurance on a motorcycle like this?

Aside from the taxes part :p! Thanx for any advice. I want to keep my van, but have the motorcycle for trips to and from work when I don't need to carry dogs around.
 

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I was wondering about this myself. I was looking at it for price but was also wondering if there is a cheaper model out there.
 

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hey guys...
no first hand experience here but my little bro has one...
he's getting 74 mpg on his.
He's tall (6'2") like I am (6'1"), and he did mention that the
handlebars can tap your knees sometimes, so they need tweaking
but he tweaked them and felt it helped.
I sat on a new 09 and felt his statements were correct.
New, out the door here on Kauai I could get it for $4K.
He said it felt a bit weird at 70-80 mph but ok at 50.
this is all I know.
gp
 

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Exorcising My Angels
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Ok...I'm sick of these gass prices. I got a van to be practical because I work and have worked for dog kennels where I needed to tote dogs around all the time. WIll my van eats up a lot of gas.

I have always wanted a motorcycle and I have a few questions about the Honda Rebel.

How is it on gas?
Any 250 cc bike is going to be a gas sipper.
Can you take it on the interstate?
You can, although you probably wouldn't want to do it frequently.
Is there a better beginner bike?
Depends. Have you ever ridden before? I think if you haven't ridden before, but you've taken the BRC offered through the MSF, you can probably move up to something a bit bigger than a 250 with some confidence. If you have any doubt about your own ability, ask the RiderCoach. They can usually give you a pretty accurate assessment of your skills. A bit bigger of a bike - something in the 500-700 cc class - would probably be better for highway riding.
Is this a bike I would want for years to come?
Again, with highway riding, probably not. If you lived in an area where you had a lot of twisties and a lot of 45 mph roads getting there, then maybe. Some people swear by their Ninja 250s. But then again, people tend to drive larger cruisers than they do sportbikes, displacement-wise.
Will it do my taxes?
Yes, as long as you buy the accountant accessory through Honda. It can't be 3rd party aftermarket, though.
How much is the average insurance on a motorcycle like this?
The only answer to that question is "it depends greatly." You can run quotes through the major insurance companies online. It'll depend on the type of coverage, your gender, your driving history, your age, etc.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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I agree with PJL, except I'd like to make on addendum to this line:

A bit bigger of a bike - something in the 500-700 cc class - would probably be better for highway riding.
You can start on a bike in that range as long as it isn't a supersport.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It will be my first bike. I guess I feel smaller is better for someone just starting out. Plus again, the price, the gas, all of that seems to be a big plus for this bike.

I'm a 25yo male and have no accident history...but I've never ridden a motorcycle...I'm sure that will affect the insurance. Is there anyway to figure an average off of that? or should I just get a quote before buying the motorcycle?

I would only be taking it on the interstate for maybe 5 miles to and from work. I really don't travel much myself...and typically when I do go somewhere, that I don't need my van for, I don't have to hit the interstate.

Sound like this is the one for me at least for awhile? I really appreciated you guys helping me out with this.
 

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Exorcising My Angels
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It will be my first bike. I guess I feel smaller is better for someone just starting out. Plus again, the price, the gas, all of that seems to be a big plus for this bike.
Fair enough. Just try to find one used from a private owner, that way you can pretty much get what you paid for it when you sell it -- you'll want to move up pretty quickly after you cut your teeth.

Couple more points as they come to mind:

If you've never ridden before, take the beginner rider course. This is especially helpful if you live in a state where motorcyclists can't ride by themselves until they have a full endorsement.

A 500 cc 2-cylinder bike can still get over 50 mpg. And you'll feel a lot more comfortable on the highway instead of having to redline a little 250 to keep up with traffic. But in the end, it's your call. I just don't think for the purposes you want it for a 250 will meet your needs for more than a season.
I'm a 25yo male and have no accident history...but I've never ridden a motorcycle...I'm sure that will affect the insurance. Is there anyway to figure an average off of that? or should I just get a quote before buying the motorcycle?
It depends a LOT on the company. Give you an example. I'm looking at SV650 bikes. Gieco quoted me $1,200 a year. Progessive quoted me $450. And those are for full coverage. You may find a specialty motorcycle insurance company that gives you a lower rate. For example, people in PA and NJ have access to Rider Insurance Co., which has a reputation for giving pretty competitive rates.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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If you only have to take the interstate for 5 miles, then I would suggest skipping the interstate all together. You will enjoy the ride more and you won't tax a 250cc bike's engine. Plus, you probably won't want to even try to tackle interstate driving until you have several months' worth of experience.
 

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Ok...I'm sick of these gass prices. I got a van to be practical because I work and have worked for dog kennels where I needed to tote dogs around all the time. WIll my van eats up a lot of gas.

I have always wanted a motorcycle and I have a few questions about the Honda Rebel.

How is it on gas?

Can you take it on the interstate?

Is there a better beginner bike?

Is this a bike I would want for years to come?

Will it do my taxes?

How much is the average insurance on a motorcycle like this?

Aside from the taxes part :p! Thanx for any advice. I want to keep my van, but have the motorcycle for trips to and from work when I don't need to carry dogs around.
Here's my take, seeing as I was asking these exact same questions when I was starting out, and did much research between the Rebel, the Yamaha V-Star 250 (Renamed from the Virago 250 in 2008), and the Suzuki GZ250.

The rebel is a good starting bike, and from what I hear, Honda's motors are "bullet proof" (or so says every review I read). Good on mileage but from what I hear, taller riders may feel cramped, as the bike is noticeably smaller than the other two I previously mentioned.

My other gripe with the rebel is that it is actually only a 234cc bike, while the GZ250 and the VStar 250 are 249cc. (only 15cc more, but on a bike that small, it's a noticeable difference as far as top speed and acceleration goes).
Despite the fact that the VStar has a slightly larger motor, it is rated to get better mileage (78mpg, although I am getting an average of 85mpg on my 2007 Yamaha Virago 250 and maxed at 100mpg) than the Rebel. Not sure what the exact mileage on the GZ250 is but worth looking into.

The GZ250 and the VStar I have seen in person (own the VStar) and they are big enough to where I do not feel cramped. But again, many say they feel cramped on a rebel. I am 5'8" and 165lbs. Also on my bike, I travel between 50-70mph on a daily basis with no problems keeping up with traffic. Passing is another story, at 60mph, you won't ZIP by another motorist, but you can pass them in a matter of 5-6 seconds from changing lanes initially.

So there you have it, my opinion: same if not better mileage, with a bigger motor and more room for your legs.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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The GZ250 gets right around 70 MPG. I'm averaging 67, but I can easily get 74 if I'm easy on the throttle.
 

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The GZ250 gets right around 70 MPG. I'm averaging 67, but I can easily get 74 if I'm easy on the throttle.
In that case, I would say to get the VStar then if gas mileage is a primary concern. Just filled up again today, and for the 4th week in a row now, it's been 85mpg, +/-2 on Rt 130, which is 55mph speed limit (I usually hover around 65mph) with traffic lights pretty frequently. On a scale of 1-10 as far as riding hard goes, with 10 being WOT at every available moment, and 1 being babying it as much as humanly possible, I probably ride it around 5-6 to keep up with busy traffic. I could probably get 90+ if I REALLY babied it, but where I ride, that could be hazardous.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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Go with whatever 250cc bike you can find (and you like, of course). They all get excellent gas mileage, and the longer you shop around for that 85 MPG bike, the longer you're driving the gas hog car, and the less money you will be saving.
 
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