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2005 CBR1000RR; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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I find it ironic an automatic transmission motorcycle is called a rebel....
By that definition, it is a Rebel --- rebelling against the norm of the 99.99% of the motorcycles out there without DCT.

But, then, again, what on earth is normalcy these days? ;)

There are times when some people are tired and they just want to cruise all day without having to do much on the ride.
There are times when some people want to be engaged with every single knob and levers.
And, there are people whose left hand is injured or have major arthritis, and they cannot ride without a DCT.

Nothing wrong with DCT or the Rebel, just machines meeting the needs of the different moods and physical capabilities of the body.
 

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By that definition, it is a Rebel --- rebelling against the norm of the 99.99% of the motorcycles out there without DCT.

But, then, again, what on earth is normalcy these days? ;)

There are times when some people are tired and they just want to cruise all day without having to do much on the ride.
There are times when some people want to be engaged with every single knob and levers.
And, there are people whose left hand is injured or have major arthritis, and they cannot ride without a DCT.

Nothing wrong with DCT or the Rebel, just machines meeting the needs of the different moods and physical capabilities of the body.
Whatever dude.... Tired and want to cruise all day? I guess shifting gears would induce a coma..... LMAO. I guess next you will want air conditioning for those hot days.
 

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1985 Yamaha Virago 1000
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363 Posts
Thanks for the post.
Could you be a little more specific so we can consider your points? What do you mean by "more solid and rideable"?
Riding on a Rebel felt like a toy compared to other beginner cruisers in the same price range. You sit on a Rebel, they feel cheap, tiny, light as a feather. I'm sure the engine is solid and reliable but if an overweight dude booked it over a speed bump I feel like you could snap the damn frame in half. Maybe some people like that about Rebels though, I don't know; could be a girls thing.
 

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2005 CBR1000RR; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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Riding on a Rebel felt like a toy compared to other beginner cruisers in the same price range. You sit on a Rebel, they feel cheap, tiny, light as a feather. I'm sure the engine is solid and reliable but if an overweight dude booked it over a speed bump I feel like you could snap the damn frame in half. Maybe some people like that about Rebels though, I don't know; could be a girls thing.
Good point about solidity.

If I'm not wrong, the trend in the transportation industry is to keep using our heads to employ new metallurgical knowledge to reduce weight but improve the rigidity and strength of the vehicles. I'd not count the loss of weight as weaker/breakable especially when you consider newer alloys that are stronger than steel but weigh less.

If you ask me whether I prefer a 460 lbs CBR1000RR vs a 430 lbs CBR1000RR, I would pick the latter, hands down. The flickability alone will sell itself for that kind of application.

As for gender preferences for weight loss or weight gain of a vehicle, let's not go there. For one thing, our society does not even know how to define gender anymore than it can define the Constitution. ;):unsure:
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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I'm wondering if Red rooster has been on the new rebel 1100, or if he's referring to the older rebels?

I haven't seen the new one in person, actually I haven't seen any 2021 model in person yet.
 

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I'm wondering if Red rooster has been on the new rebel 1100, or if he's referring to the older rebels?

I haven't seen the new one in person, actually I haven't seen any 2021 model in person yet.
Neither have I.

I am basing it of professional reviewers at first. However, now, there are a few owner's YouTube channels out there and each Vlog, they are recording and sharing their new findings along the way.

For e.g.

This Houston guy claimed to have ridden for more than 30 years, so he should know what a cruiser should feel like.
 

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1985 Yamaha Virago 1000
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363 Posts
I'm wondering if Red rooster has been on the new rebel 1100, or if he's referring to the older rebels?

I haven't seen the new one in person, actually I haven't seen any 2021 model in person yet.
Never rode the 1100, I'm referring to the 500 and 300 that's in the same style. I've rode both of them and they just feel kind of silly even to a small guy like me. We had a few customers who liked em but never found anyone putting thousands of miles on one, they'd usually come back used with less than 5k or 10k miles.
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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3,654 Posts
I was thinking you had mentioned some fire road type off-road, you still thinking that?

Looking at the cockpit of those videos, looks like they kept things to a bare minimum, seemed kinda narrow, but perhaps it's the perspective. These bikes don't retail for much at all so I imagine keeping things simple was a part of the plan.

I did notice the one rebel tore up those baggers🤭
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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Never rode the 1100, I'm referring to the 500 and 300 that's in the same style. I've rode both of them and they just feel kind of silly even to a small guy like me. We had a few customers who liked em but never found anyone putting thousands of miles on one, they'd usually come back used with less than 5k or 10k miles.

Agree 100% on the older ones, they were definitely a small bike. Where I'm from, they weren't a big seller. The local Honda dealer seldom had more than one at a time, and I only recall one going to a local female teacher at the Jr high school.
 

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I was thinking you had mentioned some fire road type off-road, you still thinking that?

Looking at the cockpit of those videos, looks like they kept things to a bare minimum, seemed kinda narrow, but perhaps it's the perspective. These bikes don't retail for much at all so I imagine keeping things simple was a part of the plan.

I did notice the one rebel tore up those baggers🤭
Well, if I go on gravel roads it will probably be like 0.001% of my travel. So, it's good to have but not a must have.

Increasing comfort for longer distance but not losing too much of the sportiness of my CBR1000RR is where I want to keep a balance.
I want comfort but I'm not willing to go to the other extreme, like a GoldWing class of cruisers.
 

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Bordeaux Red 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
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I’m 5’9”, around 185 lbs. I’ve owned all sizes and weights of bikes. On the heavy side, I’ve had a 2nd gen Valkyrie and a VTX1800. On the light side, I’ve had a Magna 750 and a Monkey. And all kinds of stuff in between, mostly cruisers, but a few sport and sport tourers as well. I’m well past the bigger- or faster-is-better stage and most recently have been just looking for something comfortable, relaxing and fun to ride. The Rebel 1100 is exactly that - it’s a perfect fit for me. It’s comfortable, the reach is just right, riding position is just right, handles great, and has more power than I’ll ever need. And the DCT just adds to the relaxation factor without taking ANYTHING away from the whole riding experience. Period. Say what you will about it being a girl’s bike, or not a real motorcycle because it doesn’t have a clutch, or whatever the hell else makes you feel better about yourself and your choices. Until you’ve actually ridden one, you have no idea what kind of a ride it is. If you’re that afraid that it being a few hundred pounds lighter than most heavy cruisers or it not having a clutch lever makes you less of a man, nobody is forcing you to buy one.

This is not directed at anyone in particular, I’m just a little tired of some of the idiotic comments I’ve seen here and elsewhere. For people who ride for whatever reasons they ride, some of you sure have a lot to say about what everybody else chooses to ride.
 

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"This is not directed at anyone in particular"
You quoted exactly what I said haha don't be shy. I didn't say anything about the Rebel 1100 if you were paying attention. Since you're all riled up though, how's it feel and ride compared to the 300 and 500?
 

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Hey @Danny Linguini ,
Did you, by any chance, gone on a longer ride, like 100 miles and above?
Is that fairly comfortable?

Not sure you saw this one, but she just let go an entire truck load on YouTube about the DCT on the Rebel 1100.
Any credibility in what she is saying?What's the clunking sound when DCT is shifting? I have never heard of that in any pro reviews. May be her Rebel is faulty?
 

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Bordeaux Red 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
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61 Posts
You quoted exactly what I said haha don't be shy. I didn't say anything about the Rebel 1100 if you were paying attention. Since you're all riled up though, how's it feel and ride compared to the 300 and 500?
Well, the thread IS about the Rebel 1100 …. Don’t know - never rode a 300 or 500 myself. But comparisons from people who have are very favorable. It’s obviously heavier, but doesn’t feel heavier. It’s a little wider, but the riding position I hear is pretty similar to the smaller siblings. Suspension is a good upgrade from the 300 and 500, with adjustable preload front and rear. Compared to other bikes I’ve owned, this one’s ride is one of the most comfortable, and it’s also one of the quickest.

Yes, the 300 and 500 were targeted at beginners and smaller riders (though I’ve also seen some fairly good sized dudes riding them). The 1100 is targeting riders who like the style but just want more machine. And from everything I’m hearing, dealers can’t keep them in stock - they’re selling them as fast as they get them. People are even ‘settling’ for DCT models when they prefer a manual because the wait is too long for a manual.

A lot of people just have to have a manual, because that’s what they want, and that’s fine - you have to ride what you love and love what you ride, and obviously that’s what the vast majority of riders have only known. But there’s also a lot of riders who have been convinced by just one test ride that the DCT is pretty damn nice and made the switch. I’ve been riding for close to 40 years, everything up til now has been a manual. I took a chance on this DCT just based on what I’d heard from reviews and owners of other DCT bikes, and it’s better than I ever imagined.
 

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Bordeaux Red 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 DCT
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Hey @Danny Linguini ,
Did you, by any chance, gone on a longer ride, like 100 miles and above?
Is that fairly comfortable?
I’ve only been on one ride over a couple of hours, about 120 miles, and it’s pretty comfortable, considering I haven’t been able to ride anything over the last few years without needing a break after that long. Some owners aren’t happy with the stock seat, but I’m finding it pretty good so far. The bike only has about a 180-mile range on a full tank at best, so about the time it’s ready for a fillup, I’m good and ready for a butt break.
 

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I’ve only been on one ride over a couple of hours, about 120 miles, and it’s pretty comfortable, considering I haven’t been able to ride anything over the last few years without needing a break after that long. Some owners aren’t happy with the stock seat, but I’m finding it pretty good so far. The bike only has about a 180-mile range on a full tank at best, so about the time it’s ready for a fillup, I’m good and ready for a butt break.
Excellent ! That's really good news.
 

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American Legion Rider & sub-Administrator
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And the DCT just adds to the relaxation factor without taking ANYTHING away from the whole riding experience.
I'm curious about this DCT and not at all downplaying it, but did it take you time to get used to not shifting or do you sometimes still catch yourself trying to shift even now. Habits are very hard to break and I don't know anything more of a habit than years of shifting would be. The whole muscle memory thing would seem to play in here I'd think.
 
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