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Discussion Starter #1
I will be helping a friend with replacing the rear inner tube on his 1976 CB550. I'm not sure when the last time the rear bearings have been serviced, and I'm guessing they might need it and it's a good time to do it. I have not looked at the wheel or bearings yet.

Honda no longer makes the bearing retainer removal tool. What clever ideas have worked best to remove the retainer without the Honda tool?

Ideally, I don't want to hammer on it with a punch and screw it up.

Bonus Questions:
Are these bearing retainers staked?
Are these sealed bearings and/or are sealed bearings available as replacements if needed?
 

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The earliest Honda shop manual I have is 1985 so I don't know how much changed between your friend's bike and then. This manual suggests that if you don't have the tool, use a brass or aluminum drift and tap the bearing race out from the opposite side of the wheel. A steel punch is more likely to gouge the wheel hub. Like any bearing, use little taps and calmly work your way around the rim. Serenity. You'll have to wiggle the spacer around out of the way as you work your way around the bearing. (Honda calls it a Distance Collar.)

Looking at the pictures I think a blind hole puller of the expandable sort would work too. Like a Harbor Freight cheepie kind. Put it in from one side, expand it until it gets a purchase on the bearing race, and then tap it out with a drift from the other side. Of course, if the body happens to be wide enough to rest on the hub or a washer or something you can just turn it out.

I have no idea what's available as a Honda replacement part but just about all motorcycle bearings are industry standard sizes, so if you take the old one to a bearing shop they can likely get you a sealed replacement bearing that's probably cheaper then one from a Honda shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I got the torque specs from a pdf manual. It gives a little detail about the retainer such that it has reverse threads and the tool number. (now discontinued)

It seems they now have sealed bearings that will fit in the hub, so if they need replacement, I think that's the way to go. I imagine they will need to be greased at minimum.
 

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If that is a tapered bearing; I don't think replacing it with a sealed bearing is a good idea. I never reuse a bearing race once it has been removed. Also most know never put a new bearing into a old race.
I know most bearing houses can find just about any bearing you can think of. I personally prefer Timken bearings.
 

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Ah-hah. I just found a schematic from a place that sells replacement retainers. So it's a threaded in kind, as you just said. That's different then the way it's shown in my 85 manual, obviously.

Okay, how about making a tool from a piece of flat bar stock and two small metal dowels?
 

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the pin wrench is the right way to go, but the one linked is way too small. A steel strap and dowels or socket-head bolts may be the best way to fab one.

BTW, the bearings are driven into the wheels, with this note in the manual: "The 6304A and 6305A ball bearing incorporate a seal on the outside, therefore, make sure that the bearing is not inverted." This is from the CB450 manual, but most parts are interchangeable, so I expect this applies to your bike. There is no mention of torque on the retainer, so I expect just snug will do; they show the removal tool as a T-handle spanner, so it can't have been too tight.
 

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On my CB750, I used a piece of flat steel bar with two small holes drilled distanced the same as the holes in the retainer. Two bolts of the right diameter with retaining nuts so that the length of exposed bolt is just shy of the depth of hole. This allows yow to push down on the bar to stop the bolts from skipping out of the holes. I also ended up using a clamp (through the spokes onto the other side of the hub) to act as a 3rd set of hands to stop it from slipping out whilst I turned it. Worked great.

Oh, and use some copper grease on the thread before putting it back.
 
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