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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #1
We like to stop and see the history of our state a lot when riding. Yesterday we stopped at a couple and got some pics.



 

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American Legion Rider
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I like to stop at these sites as well here in Texas. Some have little known history about the Indians of the area. We seem to be good at not recording our Indian history very well so I make a habit to stop at historical markers just to see if there is anything related to Indians. I don't take pictures though. I should have done that.:thumbsdown: I've found some in places very very few travel. I wish there was a map containing all of them. Or if there is I'm not aware of it. I'd buy one. It might be the only thing left some day.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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Awesome! :thumbsup:

I'm guessing you have quite the collection of pictures already!

What a neat idea for rides. Do you have any kind of guide for where Historical Markers are located or do you just find them by chance when out riding?
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #5
If we see a sign and it's paved, or well used we will stop. There is a list here but mostly we just ride and stop. It also gives us a break to get off the bike and stretch a while.

There is a lot of stuff that was not taught in school, it's more just to know.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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If we see a sign and it's paved, or well used we will stop. There is a list here but mostly we just ride and stop. It also gives us a break to get off the bike and stretch a while.

There is a lot of stuff that was not taught in school, it's more just to know.
THIS is another one for Nebraska.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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:thumbsup::thumbsup: That's a good quick reference although some are missing. I see it's a work in progress and the plan is to have every marker located. I've got it bookmarked!
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #11
I noticed that it is a little short after I posted it. Apparently they haven't been around your area and south much.
 

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Gone.
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I like to stop and check them out sometimes too. I don't all the time though, because sometimes we're past them before we seem them, or we're trying to get somewhere and don't always have time, but you can find out some fun things about the area you're riding through when you are able to stop.

We saw a few in Nebraska that pointed out the original Oregon trail and sure enough, there it was. You could see the remains of wagon ruts just leading out across a field, still very visible today. That was fascinating.
 

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Driftless Rider
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I'm the same way as the OP. I could fill pages on this thread with historical and also geological marker photos.

Many of them contain little tidbits of information that just aren't told anywhere else.
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #14
Hit a few more today, only got 80 miles in because the wife couldn't handle the dust. It was 95° today and the wind is blowing about 30mph, still a good ride!





 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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Awesome! :thumbsup::thumbsup:

I can't blame your wife for wanting to cut it a bit short... twas a windy bugger today! Harvest dust and dirt in the air is raising heck with allergies.
 

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Very Famous Person
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...

We saw a few in Nebraska that pointed out the original Oregon trail and sure enough, there it was. You could see the remains of wagon ruts just leading out across a field, still very visible today. That was fascinating.
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I like sites like that. While this may seem odd, what I have done many times is to go to the tracks and just try to meditate and feel inside of me the spirit of the pioneers who traveled that way long ago. I try to imagine that I can talk to them and thank them for their adventurousness. I try to see them bouncing in their wagons or walking alongside and risking their lives each day against pests, native tribes, stampedes, disease, starvation, mechanical breakdowns, and so on. I admire their willingness to go where the future was so uncertain. Sometimes I think I can really be there for a few moments. Once in awhile, magic happens.

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Gone.
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--

I like sites like that. While this may seem odd, what I have done many times is to go to the tracks and just try to meditate and feel inside of me the spirit of the pioneers who traveled that way long ago. I try to imagine that I can talk to them and thank them for their adventurousness. I try to see them bouncing in their wagons or walking alongside and risking their lives each day against pests, native tribes, stampedes, disease, starvation, mechanical breakdowns, and so on. I admire their willingness to go where the future was so uncertain. Sometimes I think I can really be there for a few moments. Once in awhile, magic happens.

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:71baldboy:

It can be quite an experience to stand where history was made, and try to put yourself into the moment. I enjoy reading a lot of history, but sometimes when you can stand where it took place, see the terrain, touch the objects, and so forth, it lends quite a different clarity to what you read, then just turning the pages in a book.

The last few years I've started putting a little spiral notebook in my windshield bag and making some notes about things we pass when we stop for the night. Just a scribble or two to remind me, then when we get home I look up a lot of the stuff I made notes on. For example, we've ridden by "Tate's Hell" state park quite a few times in the Florida panhandle, but I finally made a note and read up on why it's named that.

A few years ago a dear friend passed on his books to me, and among them was a set of books on the Old West, which I put on a shelf and left to gather dust. After some trips riding through Texas and other parts of the West for the last couple of years I pulled them out and started reading them. Amazing stuff.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I was riding out west of where I live one day in a very remote area. One where you would never want to break down. Like 40 miles from any town no matter which way you went, when I spotted a historical marker.

So I had to stop. Turned out to be the spot where a lot of trading with native American tribes was done by the French. I just stood there trying to imagine it. Out in the middle of nowhere. Nothing but low growing brush between two butts.

I decided right there that without our native Americans there is a huge gap in our history. Here was a place that they gathered to trade goods and the only mention of it is a historical marker that 99.9% of Americans will never ever see. The area suddenly became a little haunting. I was glad I went down that road to nowhere. :thumbsup:

I do that a lot here but that was the first time I found a historical marker in such a remote location. They are usually near a town. At least around here they are. For some reason at this one a town just never grew even though it was the site of much trading. Really really odd.

Obviously there's a gap in our French connection too. But at least here, on a remote historical marker, it all came together. Once upon a time.
 
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