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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted em..........and I got em! Highway pegs on a Crash Bar setup.

Only thing is, because of my seating position and leg length, I end up having to rest my ankles on the highway pegs.

If I put the bottoms of my feet on the pegs, I find myself sitting with a fair amount of bend to my legs that is uncomfortable for any length of time.

Is this typical of most riders (that the distance to the pegs forces ankle-resting, in order to be more comfortable)? After all, isn't the whole idea behind "highway pegs" that you can stretch out?

Obviously I don't use them in local traffic; only on a long stretch where I'm not in need of shifting at all.

Also, I have learned how delicate I have to be, when transferring from my normal foot pad positioning, TO the "highway pegs." I learned that too much of an abrupt movement, can screw with the way the bike is handling, making for a dangerous "control" situation when going "to" or "from" the highway pegs.

I didn't have "highway pegs" on my first bike, so this last season of riding again, was a learning curve. Bigger bike as well this past year, from a 500 to a 750cc, even though the general size of the bike was similar (weight, length).

-Soupy
 

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Once you've gotten use to the different foot positions you won't have to be "delicate" about switching.

The pegs pictured in the other thread are the ones I had on my C50, and I had them high like yours because I had set the bike up for laid back riding, I needed the push back because I was sitting in the seat wrong and I pulled the handlebars back so I didn't need to bend forward to reach them.

On that bike if I did not have a good seat with a backrest and the handlebars pulled back, then I would sit in the seat the right way and the highway pegs would have been much lower.

On my current C50 style bike(Kaw 900 Classic) I don't have a back rest or the handlebars pulled back, I have floorboard mounted highway mini-floorboards, basically little floorboards that stick out and up from the main floorboard, and they are angled back toward me.
 

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I have had "Highway pegs" on many bikes, just to stretch my legs once in a while, since standing up to do so has for some reason become harder as the years accumulate.

I normally just positioned my shoes/ boots on the footpegs in the 'typical' position but once is a while, stretched my legs out and rested my 'calves' on the pegs, which in itself was uncomfortable unless I had high boots on. Once in a while on my BMW 'R' series, boxer twins, I would rest my calves on the valve covers, especially nice when it was cold.

To be safe using highway pegs takes some forethought and common sense to use them safely: On the Interstate, with little traffic, they are safe but in traffic, they are not so. Obviously in the mountains and on curvy country roads, they can be dangerous, if a panic situation ensued, requiring lifting the feet and correctly repositioning them in a NANO second.

If a rider is used to 'forward controls,' then using highway pegs is probably second nature to them but those that have 'rear set backs,' or even 'Mid controls,' probably have an adjustment to make to be safe.

My HD Electra Glide, had the footpegs mounted inside the engine guard and my feet were really in a probably dangerous position if I suddenly went down or had a panic situation and had trouble extracting my feet quickly but thank GOD it never happened.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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It might make for an interesting video if you could have someone filming while you quickly take your feet from the regular pegs to the highway pegs while on a curve, and then put them back again. Its always interesting to see someone else try something that seems a bit dangerous.

I often see riders using their highway pegs in city traffic. I don't wish them any harm, but sometimes I think I would like to see how fast they could move their feet back to the normal pegs for an emergency stop.
 

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The first time I rode a bike with forward controls I felt like it was the most stupid position a rider could put himself into. Just stopping at a light and putting ones feet down was a chore and of course trying to position the feet forward in stop and go or slow traffic was to me dangerous--not to mention a perceived 'center of balance' problem that I didn't like.:icon_mad:

Some of the stock cruisers (Victory and Indian) have models with 'Ape hangers" and very far forward controls and a little tiny, hard seat all of which at least to me is a recipe for not only discomfort but for disaster as far as handling goes---But, who am I to Judge????;)

Sam:icon_cool:
 

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there are many different kinds of pegs. look at all the choices on the Kuryakyn web site. chances are that you can find better pegs that will be more comfortable.

I use them on the freeways and the rural open road highways. NEVER around the local city streets in LA. Yeah, it could be a little unstable when you move your legs, but you'll figure out how to make the transition pretty quickly.

good luck! it's definitely a big improvement for the long-distance rides!

dT
 

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I have forward controls and my highway pegs are just infront and a little outside of the floorboards. Basically an extension of the floorboard, I rest my heel on the floorboard and my toes on the pegs
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It might make for an interesting video if you could have someone filming while you quickly take your feet from the regular pegs to the highway pegs while on a curve............... I often see riders using their highway pegs in city traffic...........

First off, I would NEVER attempt a foot position switch (from foot pads to highway pegs) around a corner. That just seems plain foolish to me!

Secondly, I wouldn't EVER use my highway pegs in any situation where I anticipated (SIPDE) any need to be in full "correction" mode. I ONLY consider using the highway pegs in situations where there is a really nice stretch of wide open (very visible) road, and little or no traffic.

For any "newbie" riders who are reading this, I STRONGLY recommend you heed my words on these matters!!

-Soupy
 

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On my Suzuki Boulevard M50 I used to rest the back of my boots on the regular foot pegs so I could stretch my legs out, but only on the open road and it was really easy to replace my feet on the pegs too. I'd angle my feet outside both the gear change and foot brake levers, and it gave the legs just a break from their normal position.
 

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I've ridden with floorboards mounted on the engine guard bars since 2007. You will quickly learn how to move your feet, and keep the bike stable using the handlebars, during quick transitions. I don't use my floorboards in town, but even on the two-lane highways, things happen, and you do not have a choice about how slowly, and carefully, you would like to transition...

I have done it too many times to count, riding two-up, with my bride behind me, and she's done the same, with me behind her on the seat. We tour, two-up, and the floorboards are a necessity for comfort, and to avoid making too many stops -- we already stop every two hours to stretch, and swap places on the bike. Quick changes with your feet are a 'necessity', born out of reality checks on the road. Truth is, you will need to transition quickly, sooner, or later. Practice helps. It is all about becoming comfortable, and confident, in your handling of the bike, under all riding conditions. Things happen, be prepared, and confident in your own abilities. Cheers!
:coffee:

PS: We ride a full touring bike, usually with full bags, and trunk. It's not a light-weight machine: 1993 Kawasaki Voyager XII. Much more bike to handle than our previous Honda CB750. Practice. Cheers! +1
:biggrin:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My previous bike (a Honda Shadow also) had only pegs for me and the passenger.

One day I noticed a rider of a Cruiser (with only pegs) placing his feet (as the driver) on the passenger pegs for a "change of pace" (I presume). I tried THAT "once." (only "once")

-Soupy
 

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I bought kuryakin longhorn pegs that allow about four inches of adjustment form the engine guards. It gives me a little better custom fit.
 

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The position of the riders feet, while on the motorcycle obviously is of paramount importance, especially in a panic situation.

When Floorboards became fashionable and commonplace, the professional testers considered them dangerous because of the rider having to LIFT his foot from the floorboard, find the Car like brake pedal and then push down to slow or stop as compared to a riders foot being right above the brake pedal, only requiring a 'push' down to slow or stop. There were significant differences in reaction time and stopping distances between the two types.

Some riders have caught their boot/ shoe soles on the side of the car type brake pedal (ME) as they attempted to lift their foot up, move it left and push on the pedal.

I have no problem with the Car type brake pedal and floorboards or highway pegs as I've had lots of bikes with both. Practice makes perfect.

Now, lets examine the difference in shifting through the gears on bikes with far extended or floorboard heel and toe shifters (Push on top to downshift- push down with the heel to upshift) versus the standard up and down shift just using the riders toes on the gearshift lever, right below his feet.

I remember riding a very expensive HD, Springer something, with forward controls and as I sat at a traffic light, I'd put the trans in neutral as I coasted up to the line, lifted both my feet from the pegs, requiring me to use the front brake only for the complete stop. (I know---I know--leave it in gear etc) When the light changed, I had to put most of the weight on my right leg and the extend my left leg to find the peg and the shifter, which seemed like it took forever! I guess one gets used to it.

I also didn't at all enjoy the mildly extended front end, something like Peter Fonda's ride in 'Easy rider.' What stupidity just to look COOL:icon_mad:

My opinions only and your results may vary:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think the FIRST time I saw someone riding with their feet extended forward (presumably on Highway Pegs) I must've thought it looked "cool."

However, when I finally GOT Highway Pegs on a bike of my own, I felt "unsafe," and "out of control." As if I couldn't react properly to a situation that would require a quick braking or shifting response.

I still feel that way, and don't ride very long or very often on the Highway Pegs. If I can't respond well, I'm risking more than I care to.

I just wondered if the wheel base on most Cruisers, force an ankle resting, because the leg angle would force knees up too high?

-Soupy
 

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Not clear what you're asking, but as I pointed out, your highway pegs are very high. Mine were high on my C50 because it was setup for laying back, if it hadn't been setup for laying back the highway pegs would never have been that high.
 

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Soupy, can you mount the pegs lower on the highway bars? That would give more leg room, and I would venture to say a more comfortable riding experience.
 

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I wanted em..........and I got em! Highway pegs on a Crash Bar setup.

Only thing is, because of my seating position and leg length, I end up having to rest my ankles on the highway pegs.

If I put the bottoms of my feet on the pegs, I find myself sitting with a fair amount of bend to my legs that is uncomfortable for any length of time.

Is this typical of most riders (that the distance to the pegs forces ankle-resting, in order to be more comfortable)? After all, isn't the whole idea behind "highway pegs" that you can stretch out?

-Soupy
Hey Soupy, sorry I didn't get back to you sooner, I've been on ex with the army for the last 3 weeks, and thought I posted a reply to your statement regarding highway pegs, but I guess I lost signal before I was able to send it.
Anyway, for my Virago, I got a set of offset highway pegs from Kuryakin. They sell accesories for metric cruisers, and I found these were able to add about 3 1/4" of leg room to my riding position. This is the link to them,

http://www.cruisercustomizing.com/kuryakyn-dually-footpegs-with-offset-mounts-and-1-14-inch-clamps-pair/part/KY-7993

and
here's a picture of them
00000.jpg
 

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They are beautiful pegs and high quality but the bolt that holds them in place will constantly loosen, so carry a wrench with you. I've had several bikes with those KURY adjustable Highway pegs.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Porky is absolutely correct. I had the same problem with my set. The bolt-hole is made of soft metal and I stripped the threads on it trying to get them tight enough so as not to back off. After I put a helicoil in as a repair to this issue, they have never backed off again. It worked out for me, but I agree that it's a flawed design.
 
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