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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems my dream of owning my 1st motorcycle is finally in my grasp. Im figuring my tax return should yeild $5000+ and have no obligation other than purchasing a bike. I've ride a little bit but never owned my own. I'm very excited but hesitant due to my lack of knowledge of bike. I know they're risk involved in buying any used vehicle but am more afraid of purchasing a bike that fails to meet the plans I have.
I live in southern Kentucky. I am a minimulist of sorts so I plan on riding my bike a lot! I also spend a lot of time in Cincinnati, (I'm a huge Reds fan and my favorite rock bar is in downtown) so I invision frequent long trips.
I want a cruiser. I need something reliable and capable of road trips. I want EFI. I'm hoping for comfort.
I'm hoping to gain some wisdom from people who have been where I'm at now. I need options. Come hell or high water I will own a bike so insight and ideas would be greatly appreciated but remember I am on a budget.

Thanks.
 

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$5000 can buy you a danged nice lightly-used cruiser. Locally, there's a 2017 Suzuki Boulevard C50 for sale, asking $4895. It has all of 126 miles on it! I bought my well-maintained '08 Suzuki with 13k miles on it about a year and a half ago for $2750. Start looking at Craiglist listings and trade magazines in your area, plus checking out used dealer stocks. There is a world of great options out there for you.
 

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It may behoove you to go to local dealers and sit on used bikes in their stock and find some models that feel right to you. Most major brand bikes in the small used cruiser category would be able to do what you want. There is no single bike that will work.

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Welcome to the forum and the world of motorcycles. Ronk gave you some very good advice.
 
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Welcome to the forum!

You didn't mention your physical size. If you are a full sized person but less than 275lbs, and based on what you said your criteria was, I would recommend considering the Suzuki C50 which is an 805, the Honda Shadow 750, Yamaha VStar 650, and the Kawasaki Vulcan 900. These are all mid sized "metric cruisers". In later model years I believe they are all EFI equipped. One should be able to find a good example of any bike on this short list for less than $4K.

I personally think that a person's first machine should be considered as somewhat expendable, minor accidents happen, especially to beginners, especially at low speed or while stopped.

If you are a small person I'd recommend starting on an even lighter machine, if you are larger, you might want a more powerful one.
 

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Welcome to the forum!!! To ditto everyone else here, you can get a GOOD bike with $5k. But I wouldn't shoot for the stars and get a bucket level bike as your first. Spend a grand or so on a cheap beater bike you won't feel bad laying down. Then once you feel you've gotten some experience, upgrade to a bigger toy!
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome to the forum!

You didn't mention your physical size. If you are a full sized person but less than 275lbs, and based on what you said your criteria was, I would recommend considering the Suzuki C50 which is an 805, the Honda Shadow 750, Yamaha VStar 650, and the Kawasaki Vulcan 900. These are all mid sized "metric cruisers". In later model years I believe they are all EFI equipped. One should be able to find a good example of any bike on this short list for less than $4K.

I personally think that a person's first machine should be considered as somewhat expendable, minor accidents happen, especially to beginners, especially at low speed or while stopped.

If you are a small person I'd recommend starting on an even lighter machine, if you are larger, you might want a more powerful one.
Thanks for the heads up. I'm 6'2", 235lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
$5000 can buy you a danged nice lightly-used cruiser. Locally, there's a 2017 Suzuki Boulevard C50 for sale, asking $4895. It has all of 126 miles on it! I bought my well-maintained '08 Suzuki with 13k miles on it about a year and a half ago for $2750. Start looking at Craiglist listings and trade magazines in your area, plus checking out used dealer stocks. There is a world of great options out there for you.
Thanks
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It may behoove you to go to local dealers and sit on used bikes in their stock and find some models that feel right to you. Most major brand bikes in the small used cruiser category would be able to do what you want. There is no single bike that will work.

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Thanks for the advice. I will definitely use it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Welcome to the forum!!! To ditto everyone else here, you can get a GOOD bike with $5k. But I wouldn't shoot for the stars and get a bucket level bike as your first. Spend a grand or so on a cheap beater bike you won't feel bad laying down. Then once you feel you've gotten some experience, upgrade to a bigger toy!
Thanks for the advice. Ive been eyeing a couple of nomad classics and Honda vtx's that are priced around $2500. I'm a pretty big boy (6'2" 240lbs)and a very cautious driver. Do u believe 1100-1300cc is too much for me. I know that my first will be a "warhorse" and fully understand that my 1st will be my teacher and eventually end up on the asphalt. I have a lot of highway miles in mind and have heard that smaller bikes sometimes get tosses around on the highway.
I've sat on 1100 and 1300 and neither felt too heavy.
I sat on a 750 and 883 and I imagined the 1100 & 1300 feeling better at cruising speed. The 750 & 883 honestly felt a little light but this was while standing still.
More feedback is appreciated.
 

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What makes a bike "too heavy" is difficulty controlling it at very low speeds, particularly U-turns, and when you must upright it after it tips over when parking or maneuvering in your garage. Once up to speed, the bigger the bike, the easier it is to keep on track going down the road. While a light weight dirt bike is purposely for zig-zagging around bumps and rocks, a street bike is purposely for holding still on pavement.

Therefore, if you are comfortable moving/pushing around a large bike while parked and you don't feel like it's about to make you drop it, and you have decent strength in your body, then any size bike is easily doable. The biggest holdback in choosing a bike for most riders is knowing how to control their throttle and twitchy performance of the bike. Many riders are just not wise in choosing a modern sport bike that goes 140 mph in second gear in 8 seconds! I'm not able to do that. o_O I know what's not safe for me.

So if you are mature and cautious in your selection; you absorb training classes (or books, or tapes); and you remain judicious in your performance, then any bike size will work.

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