Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here there guys!

My head measures 59cm, I'm a large no doubt.

The issue I have it the openings in 99% of helmets at a large size, it's painful rug burn sensation on my cheek bones and the area next to my eyes to pun on and remove any helmet the proper size..

Is this normal, is it most likely my head shape?
 

·
Registered
2015 BMW K1600GTL & 2008 Harley Davidson Dyna Super Glide Custom
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Here there guys!

My head measures 59cm, I'm a large no doubt.

The issue I have it the openings in 99% of helmets at a large size, it's painful rug burn sensation on my cheek bones and the area next to my eyes to pun on and remove any helmet the proper size..

Is this normal, is it most likely my head shape?
To a point it is normal. Most better brands offer different size cheek pads etc to help.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2015 BMW K1600GTL & 2008 Harley Davidson Dyna Super Glide Custom
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Thank you very much, i'm newer to higher end, I purchased an arai corsair X and an RF-1200 and both rub the skin around my eyes during take off, and it's a tad bit painful.
Both of those brands offer replacement pads, and entire interiors to assist with fit

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
--

Those are both full face which means the neck area is always going to be real tight when putting on. This is more true with high end helmets with chin curtains. The curtains are for wind protection when at speed which gives you the quieter helmet than a more loose fitting brand. As VV mentioned, there are replacement pads such that you can add or remove areas that may be too tight or loose. The only way to have a helmet easier to put on/off is to have a modular with a flip up face or an open face helmet. Of course you lose protection with the open face type.

Sometimes it seems like the only way to get the fit just right is to entirely wrap your face in long bandages going around and around. You'll look like a mummy, but it does fit perfectly. :smile:

--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
--

Those are both full face which means the neck area is always going to be real tight when putting on. This is more true with high end helmets with chin curtains. The curtains are for wind protection when at speed which gives you the quieter helmet than a more loose fitting brand. As VV mentioned, there are replacement pads such that you can add or remove areas that may be too tight or loose. The only way to have a helmet easier to put on/off is to have a modular with a flip up face or an open face helmet. Of course you lose protection with the open face type.

Sometimes it seems like the only way to get the fit just right is to entirely wrap your face in long bandages going around and around. You'll look like a mummy, but it does fit perfectly. :smile:

--
Haha Thank you very much for your suggestion
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
5,413 Posts
Those pads will break in with some use, my Arai was like that for a month or so until it finally broke in, and I wear it every day.
If it's really an issue though you can get different pads and cushions to custom fit it. I'd suggest you see a good dealer, they can fix you up right away, it's probably worth a decent ride to get it straightened out once rather than guessing and ordering things.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,421 Posts
Or you could use a half-shell!!
Yep. But be warned, a half helmet might ruin you for any full helmets. I hate going back to my modular for winter after wearing my half all summer. It always takes some getting used to the closed in feeling.:sad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
A half helmet is like half protection. If you only need a half of a brain, go right ahead.

Helmets tend to relax over time and they are supposed to be somewhat tight. You realize they have a five year, 5 year, life? Get a Arai, Shoei, AGV or similar high end helmet. On almost all helmets of any quality you can adjust the fit by removing foam layers or getting a different liner fit.

Some people were born with half of a brain or even without a brain, this is clear, if you happen to have one, there is only one way to protect it, a full face helmet. I do have a 3/4 helmet/open face, I use it on my mini-bike which is not even 3/4s of a motorcycle. For my motorcycle(s) I wear a SHOEI full face helmet.

If you think your helmet is rubbing your then wait until you slide down the road on your chin and then get back with me afterwards about how that worked out.
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
A half helmet is like half protection. If you only need a half of a brain, go right ahead.

Helmets tend to relax over time and they are supposed to be somewhat tight. You realize they have a five year, 5 year, life? Get a Arai, Shoei, AGV or similar high end helmet. On almost all helmets of any quality you can adjust the fit by removing foam layers or getting a different liner fit.

Some people were born with half of a brain or even without a brain, this is clear, if you happen to have one, there is only one way to protect it, a full face helmet. I do have a 3/4 helmet/open face, I use it on my mini-bike which is not even 3/4s of a motorcycle. For my motorcycle(s) I wear a SHOEI full face helmet.

If you think your helmet is rubbing your then wait until you slide down the road on your chin and then get back with me afterwards about how that worked out.
--

Wow, you really like to hit it on those who might have a different view. If you want to have safety all over your body then you should have full chest, elbow, back, hand, ankle, foot, knee, shoulder, protection also. You should always have a windshield on and grip protection along with engine guards. Then equip your bike with the latest satellite guidance for roadway problems. Of course always let all parties be familiar with the route you'll be taking and times you will call to check in on progress. Never travel by yourself and then only totally within a safe manner. And don't travel on roadways with much traffic--or even better, stay only on riding courses that have no cars or trucks or people or dogs or deer and safety crews available for any emergencies. Sound like you? Sound like anybody you know? Me either.

If you want total safety, you aren't going to ride a bike. It's that simple. We all choose the degree of safety we want to live with and protect ourselves with what we reasonably feel we'll need.

So get off your horse. :devil:

--
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
5,413 Posts
I agree with Ron, I personally wear a full face helmet, jacket, gloves and boots for every ride but that's what I'm comfortable with, I don't judge others and rarely give an opinion on gear unless asked, it's just going to cause an argument and no one will be open to change their mind unless they asked to begin with. Ask me and I will be more than glad to tell you what I think you should wear and why, but you have to ask.

My opinion is that it's an adults personal choice what they wear, it's their skin and their head. There are folks who would take me to task for my one gap, wearing my work pants to work most of the time and not armored riding pants.

But that's MY choice..


--

Wow, you really like to hit it on those who might have a different view. If you want to have safety all over your body then you should have full chest, elbow, back, hand, ankle, foot, knee, shoulder, protection also. You should always have a windshield on and grip protection along with engine guards. Then equip your bike with the latest satellite guidance for roadway problems. Of course always let all parties be familiar with the route you'll be taking and times you will call to check in on progress. Never travel by yourself and then only totally within a safe manner. And don't travel on roadways with much traffic--or even better, stay only on riding courses that have no cars or trucks or people or dogs or deer and safety crews available for any emergencies. Sound like you? Sound like anybody you know? Me either.

If you want total safety, you aren't going to ride a bike. It's that simple. We all choose the degree of safety we want to live with and protect ourselves with what we reasonably feel we'll need.

So get off your horse. :devil:

--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Opinions aside, the fact is that a full face helmet provides significantly greater protection to the areas shown to be often impacted and injured than half or 3/4 helmets. The OP needs to work with the fit of his/her helmet or get one that fits better (different shape) but going to a lesser coverage helmet because this one rubs, no way is that a good move. Some helmets need a little time to break in.

Okay you are right, I am wrong, a half helmet is not half protection, it is a little better than no protection, granted, and the same with a 3/4 or open face. Kind of reminds me of those oral cancer and chewing tobacco public service statements, life without a face is not going to be fun. Though I hear they are doing face transplants these days you still need some bone to stick it to.

OP if you have a full face you need to stay with it, if you do not, you need to get one that fits well. I think Shoeis for example tend to fit slightly oval heads and I think Arai tends to be more rounded, do some Google study. OP, wear protective gear and a full face helmet all the time and should you take a spill you will have a factually much better chance of walking away. Personal freedom, sure, go ahead, this is still America, but things like gravity, kinetic energy and asphalt tend not to argue the finer points. We are free to make a choices, make good ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,328 Posts
You'll find that some helmet makes are more circular, some are more oval. Some heads are more round, some are more oval. So the best way to check a helmet is to go to a big motorcycle accessary store and have someone help fit you for the right size and shape helmet.

Helmet use is a matter of personal choice, full, modular, 3/4, open, no helmet at all - it's your choice and you take whatever consequences are involved. If you're lucky you'll never need to rely on a helmet. I have - sliding down the road on my closed visor and the forward side of the helmet - so I was thankful that I wore full face (modular) protection. But you may never, and I hope you never do, need head protection. Personal choice.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top