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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What's up everyone! I'm Brad from PalmCoast Florida, just got my first bike a 1983 Suzuki GS1100g. Picked it up for 400 dollars.
Since I'm new to the bike scene I dont really know a lot about bikes. I got a bike because it looks like fun.
My bike isn't running just yet, the dude I bought it from said he had it running three weeks ago after he jumped it off.
I'm a little nervous jumping it off, I dont think using a car battery will be a good idea for it.
I'm not sure what other issues I'll have with the bike I just got it into my garage

Nonetheless I got cool project under my belt and cant wait to start riding!
60447
 

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Welcome, and thanks for the good introduction. My first bike was a '78 Suzuki GS550. Smaller, but basically the same design as yours except yours has shaft drive vs. the chain that was on mine. Easy to work on and very reliable.

You can use a car battery to jump start your bike, but be sure the car is not running. The car battery by itself has more than enough oomph to start your bike. You can take the battery to pretty much any auto parts store and they'll test it for you.

A repair manual of some kind will be of great help to you. Clymer and Haynes are two publishers of repair manuals for bikes (and cars). Your local public library might have one you can borrow. Whenever I get a bike I just go ahead and buy the Clymer manual for it because I know I'm going to need it.

On a used bike you should pay attention to the age of the tires. They may have lots of tread left, but if they have cracks or the surface is hard and shiny they are no good. Also, tires have a date code stamped into the sidewall, showing when they were manufactured. It's a good idea to retire a tire once it reaches 6 years old, regardless how much tread it has left. It looks like your bike has tube type tires; mine did, and I believe Suzuki used the same style wheels on the '83 as on my '78. I changed my own tires using just a couple of small tire irons and a ratchet strap, it's not hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Awesome bro!
The tires look fairly new, but I'll definitely check the date on those tires though.
Should I stick with the tube tire? Or change to a tubeless?

And I just ordered a manual for it. I'm missing blinkers on the bike and plan to get some new light assembly anyway. So I think the manual will help me with some electrical stuff
 

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WELCOME ON BOARD, and...

We are a friendly site here. Well, most of us.
 

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Awesome bro!
The tires look fairly new, but I'll definitely check the date on those tires though.
Should I stick with the tube tire? Or change to a tubeless?

And I just ordered a manual for it. I'm missing blinkers on the bike and plan to get some new light assembly anyway. So I think the manual will help me with some electrical stuff
Yep, the manual should have a wiring diagram that will be very helpful for this.

I'm not sure, but I believe those rims will not take a tubeless tire. My rims had "Tube tires only" or something to that effect stamped into them. If yours don't have any kind of info stamped on them then tubeless is probably okay. And, if it currently has tubeless tires mounted then there's your answer.
 

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Yep, the manual should have a wiring diagram that will be very helpful for this.

I'm not sure, but I believe those rims will not take a tubeless tire. My rims had "Tube tires only" or something to that effect stamped into them. If yours don't have any kind of info stamped on them then tubeless is probably okay. And, if it currently has tubeless tires mounted then there's your answer.
Thanks dude
 

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Welcome aboard, Rodger gave you some very good advice. Spoke wheels? If so you cannot go tubeless.
 
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