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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

My name is Rob and I have 1978 Honda CM185T. This is my second year riding and I'm really enjoying the bike. However, I have a problem; it's stuck in fourth gear. This first happened last year. After I took off the cover I found the clutch discs locked, but a gentle tap and they released. I took the whole pack off and found this kinda grey, almost silicone like material on the clutch spindle which was preventing them from sliding properly. I cleaned it off, put everything back together, and it then shifted fine. Now it just did it again. I have yet to take it apart, but I pretty sure its going to be the same thing. I have no idea what this stuff is or how it keeps getting there. I do regular and full maintenance on the bike as outlined in the Haynes manual. This is really a huge pain because I have to drain the oil, remove the right exhaust, and Kickstand to get to all the screws for the side cover. This sucks evermore because I just got it back on the road two days ago after getting a flat rear tire repaired.

Thank you
Rob Hoffman
 

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You won't know until you get back inside but it really sounds like you didn't really find the true problem the first time you was in there. Good luck and I have no idea what the stuff is you found. I certainly would not to find it again though.

 

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Welcome

Welcome to the Forum and I hope you can fix your problem. Perhaps you might post the problem on another Forum specific to problems. It Might generate more replies that here.
Ride Safe
motorpap1
 

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This might be something contaminating the clutch plates themselves. If you aren't able to determine where it's coming from, maybe replacing the clutch will be the answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi All,

First, thanks for the replies. I searched "grey gunk" online and it seems like it could be clutch wear residue from metal discs. However, all the forums I read were also saying the oil was grey when they drained it as well. I haven't seen that. Are there different materials that discs are made of, if so what's the best type?

Thanks,
Rob Hoffman
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well I took everything apart, cleaned, reassembled and put new oil in. Now the bike changes gears, but lurches forward when put into gear. I have the clutch cable adjusted to specs. From what i've just read/found online that the problem is with the edges of the basket get worn, which I didn't think to check, so the discs don't move. Does this sound right?

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi All,

I have an update. I let the bike warm up and shift into first. If I begin to start off as normal the bike lurches and stalls. However, if I give it more gas it seems to overcome and stays running. The problem is that now I accelerate way to fast, I can no longer feather the throttle or the bike stalls. Is this still seem like problem with the clutch or a carb issue? Would a pilot jet adjustment be necessary?

Thanks,
Rob
 

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I don't know what your idle rpm is but you might check to see if it's in spec. As far as feathering to take off, it's normal on my bike to have to also give extra throttle. Feather clutch while also giving more throttle. I didn't look but have you ridden before or taken a basic riding course? Excuse me if that sounds like a stupid question but many new riders have trouble with clutch/throttle coordination.
 

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This may not solve anything, but it won't harm anything either...

Buy a can of SeaFoam (around $7 - $9), follow the directions for adding it to the crankcase (1.5 oz. per quart of oil, I believe). Put the bike on its center stand, with the rear wheel spinning freely. Start the bike, and let it idle: shift through each gear, letting the clutch out slowly, so that the wheel spins at idle speed only! Let it run a few seconds in each gear, then downshift to neutral. All of this should take less than 5 minutes -- no fan needed as your engine will just reach 180 F oil temperature, in five minutes of idling.

Drain the oil, and replace the filter. The SeaFoam will dissolve varnish, carbon, and other sludge deposits within the engine, the transmission, and the clutch -- they all share the same oil. The majority of this crap will be captured by the filter, so it needs to be replaced along with the now blackened oil -- check your oil color prior to treatment for a visual on how much crap was inside. The sludge will dissolve within seconds, no need to put miles on it, to achieve the cleaning.

The SeaFoam treatment will thin your oil slightly, but not dangerously. In 1978, the API oil standard was something like "SF", which is not safe to run in engines built after 1979! Modern oils are API "SN" -- modern API oils are nothing like the oils of 1978! This treatment needs to be done only once. Using modern API oils will prevent this kind of sludge from forming, or building up again, so no need to ever repeat this cleaning.

Be sure to use an oil which does not have the Energy Star symbol on it: oils which have the energy star have friction modifiers which can cause the clutch to slip. Diesel oils do not have the Energy Star symbol, nor do they contain the friction modifiers [check their API ratings: they are all SL (2004), SM (2010), or SN -- all modern, all safe for vehicles made before 2005]. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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Welcome from Seattle :)

I would like to politely suggest that you re-start this thread in the repair section. The mechanics hang out there and they can help you with your problem. Also, can learn from the thread.

BTW, l love the seafoam idea
 
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