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I'm goin from a toe shift to a heel toe shift. do i now shift up with my heel and down with my toe or vice versa (i'm headin by a harley dealer a little later for a 2004 FLHPI).
 
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I'm goin from a toe shift to a heel toe shift. do i now shift up with my heel and down with my toe or vice versa (i'm headin by a harley dealer a little later for a 2004 FLHPI).
That's how it works in theory, but any time I've ridden one, I just use the toe part both ways, could never get the coordination of the heel part.
 

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I had never had a heel/toe shifter until I bought my new C90T in April. I didn't like it at first, mainly because I dumped the bike on my leg the first time I got on it, and my foot was swollen. So, I learned to use it the "right" way, and it's second nature now. I also remember from years ago that on every pair of shoes I had, the left shoe top looked terrible from shifting. It's a nice feature once you get used to it.
 
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the left shoe top looked terrible from shifting.
It's a badge of honor.

My Dad cut a piece of inner tube to protect his shoes while riding, which looked almost as dorky as the rubber band my Grandfather used to keep his polyester pants out of his bicycle chain. Anyway you look at it, from a genetic standpoint I'm doomed. :D
 

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I might have ya beat. My Dad was an English teacher who is now retired and he always thought motorcycles were pointless. he kinda resembles Barney Rubble in a way. The dude can flyfish though.
 

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I'm goin from a toe shift to a heel toe shift. do i now shift up with my heel and down with my toe or vice versa (i'm headin by a harley dealer a little later for a 2004 FLHPI).
You got it but most of us never use it.
 

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I had it on my old '84 Aspencade, and got SPOOOOOILLLLED by it. (Of course, since I can't get my toe between the stock shifter and the engine bank, there wasn't much of an argument anyway.) It's nice when paired with footboards. Travel over 100 miles with pegs and then with footboards, and see which way you lean (pardon the expression :eek: ).

Markland and Kury both make really good set-ups.
 

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My heel toe shifter started out as an ornament to me. I wanted to do the toe lift as I learned from the beginning. But when I tried it, my shifts got better. I used to have this problem where I'd try to upshift to second (using my toe) from first and get into neutral as much as 50% of the time -- it used to really get on my nerves. When I used the heel to upshift, it felt good and I rarely (actually I don't remember if it ever happened) miss the shift from first to second. Ain't nothing worse than trying to accelerate and finding you're in neutral; it's worse when I start cursing out loud and forget that people can hear me (earplugs give the illusion that only I can hear myself).

Also, sometimes, if the toe shifter is too low, you have to "work" your foot under the rubber piece to be able to effectively shift (on most bikes this is adjustable). I had this problem the most when I went from pegs to floorboards. With the heel shifter, this is no longer an issue. Plus I think heel shifting helps reduce fatigue of the left shin (tibialis anterior muscle).

You just have to get used to it. In the beginning (first day or two), I had trouble finding the heel shifter and kept hitting the kickstand or something.

Like the previous post said, heel toe shifter and floorboards are a great combo.

Dennis
 

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I've ridden my cruiser almost 8,000 miles, and I STILL have a problem putting my foot on the heel pedal and shifting into nuetral after I've started. If I didn't have to cut the pedal off, I'd remove it.
 
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My dad

I have to say it seems like a cool idea but my dad picked up his Harley Road King a few weeks back with one and after 20-30 years of never riding a bike, perfect opportunitity to start using it he stills says its easier to shift normally and he does not touch the heel pedal...

I guess muscle memory just makes it too hard to relearn the motion!
 

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?

I'm goin from a toe shift to a heel toe shift. do i now shift up with my heel and down with my toe or vice versa (i'm headin by a harley dealer a little later for a 2004 FLHPI).
and you own a bike? i suggest you sell it if you have to ask stupid ? think about this.
 

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Now jackass, don't be one! We get into some very heated discussions here, but we DON'T call each other names. OK? We stick to the issues. I've been beat down a number of times and had to apologize - it's part of keeping this forum civil. I'm a member of another forum, and I don't go there anymore. They're busy calling each other names, and it's no fun at all!

By the way, MERRY CHRISTMAS! :)
 

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I'm goin from a toe shift to a heel toe shift. do i now shift up with my heel and down with my toe or vice versa (i'm headin by a harley dealer a little later for a 2004 FLHPI).
Most of the time I shift as you say, shift up with my heel and down with my toe, but when it is really cold I turn around and sit backwards to keep warm and then it is down with heel & up with toe. It takes some getting used to.
 

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BH, can I safely assume that when you ride backwards, you use a mirror to see as Buffalo Bill did when he fired his rifle? :)

This may be a little off subject, but I've never understood the initials that Harley tacks on their names. I even stopped at a Harley shop and picked up a brochure on their bikes, but it didn't explain them. Can someone enlighten me??? Thanks.
 

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BH, can I safely assume that when you ride backwards, you use a mirror to see as Buffalo Bill did when he fired his rifle? :) Yep the wife holds the mirror.

This may be a little off subject, but I've never understood the initials that Harley tacks on their names.
I even stopped at a Harley shop and picked up a brochure on their bikes, but it didn't explain them. Can someone enlighten me??? Thanks.
http://www.dlhill.com/hdalphabet.html

It's fairly simple really.
A (1926): SV/OHV 21-inch single (magneto ignition)
A (1960): TS (two stroke) 165CC Topper scooter
B (1926): SV/OHV 21-inch single
B (1955): TS 165CC single
/B: Belt-drive Sturgis model (ex. 1982 FXB)
C (1920): i.o.e. 35-inch single, special order
C (1930): SV/OHV 30.5-inch single
/C: Custom, Classic or Caf
/CH: Magneto Sportster (ex. 1958 XLCH)
D (1929): SV 45-inch twin
/D: 74-inch engine (ex. 1921 JD)
/D: Extra power (ex. 1930 DLD)
/D: Dyna Glide frame (ex. 1991 FXDB)
/DG: Disc Glide (ex. 1983 FXDG)
E (1936): OHV 61-inch twin
/E: Electric starting (ex. 1964 GE, 1974 FXE)
/E: Police engine (ex. 1953 FLE)
F (1920): i.o.e. 61-inch magneto ignition (dating from 1914)
F (1941): OHV 74-inch twin
/F: Battery ignition flat twin (ex. 1921 WF)
/F: Footshift (ex. 1952 FLF)
G (1933): SV 45-inch Servi-Car
/H: Larger engine (ex. 1936 80-inch VHL, 1955 55-inch KH)
/H: More powerful engine (ex. 1955 FLH)
I: Fuel injection (ex. 1995 FLHTCI)
J (1920): i.o.e. 61-inch twin (dating from 1915)
/J: Magneto ignition flat twin (ex. 1921 WJ)
/K: More powerful K model (ex. 1955 K11K)
L (1920): Single-passenger sidecar (dating from 1915)
/L: Higher compression engine (ex. 1936 EL)
M (1920): Commerical sidecar (dating from 1915)
M (1965): TS 50CC single, Aermacchi
/N: Newspaper delivery sidecar (ex. 1929 MN)
/N: Nostalgia (ex. 1993 FLSTN)
/O: Open-body commercial sidecar (ex. 1926 MO)
/P: Police model
Q (1920): Two-passenger sidecar chassis (dating from 1918)
R (1932): SV 45-inch twin
/R: Rubber-mount FX model (ex. 1982 FXR Super Glide)
/R: Pseudo-racing model (ex. 1983 XR-1000)
/R: Racing model (ex. 1952 KR)
S (1926): OHV 21-inch, for racing purposes
S (1948): TS 125 single
/S: Sport (ex. 1978 FXS and XLS)
/S: Sidecar use (ex. 1936 ES)
T (1921): Twin-cylinder racer
/T: TS 165 single (ex. 1953 ST)
/T: Touring (ex. 1977 XLT, 1980)
U (1937): SV 74-inch twin
V (1930): SV 74-inch twin
V (1994): DOHC 61-inch twin, for Superbike racing
W (1920): SV 36-inch flat twin (dating from 1919)
W (1937): SV 45-inch twin
/WG: Wide Glide (ex. 1980 FXWG)
X (1957): OHV 55-inch twin (usually used with L; i.e. XL)
Y: Only letter never used
Z (1973): TS 90CC single, Aermacchi


Here are some models styles to go by.

XLH Sportster 883
XLH Sportster 883 Hugger
XLH Sportster 1200
XL 1200C 1200 Custom
XL 1200S 1200 Sport
FXD Dyna Super Glide
FXDL Dyna Low Rider
FXDS-CONV Dyna Convertible
FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide
FLSTS Heritage Springer Softail
FXSTSB Bad Boy
FLSTF Fat Boy
FXSTS Springer Softail
FXSTC Softail Custom
FLSTC Heritage Softail Classic
FLHR/FLHRI Road King / Road King Fuel Injected
FLHT Electra Glide Standard
FLHTC/FLHTCI Electra Glide Classic / Electra Glide Classic
FLHTCUI Ultra Classic Electra Glide Fuel Injected
 

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Good grief! I had no idea what I was asking!!!! But, thanks, BH, I appreciate your listing them for me!

Tom
When people ask what I ride I just say Harley. It is too hard to say FLHTCUI Ultra Classic Electra Glide. At work they ask. did you ride the big one or little one?
Too many names these days.
 

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fyi

didn't mean to upset anyone. but, i find the heel-toe shifter very easyto use. i don't get it when someone can't use it.
 
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