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My fiance likes to ride her own bike around town and short trips, but doesn't really like riding long distance. She said she'd rather be a passenger. Problem is, we weigh about the same, and would run almost 575lb with gear and bags. Also, my inseam is about 28". Am I out of luck?
 

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You're not out of luck at all, but I'm not sure I understand your question. If your asking if there are bikes out there suited for two up riding with the weight that you mentioned, there are plenty of larger touring and cruiser type of bikes out there that can handle the weight. Many of those larger touring type of bikes have weight limits that max out at between 400 and 500 lbs, but with different upgraded suspension, they can handle more weight.

PS; Forgot to mention that the tires that you use need to be able to handle the weight load, especially the rear tire.
 

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I think the Goldwing max weight is less, and so is the HD Ultra. If the suspension and tire upgrade would cover it, that's cool - I can go that direction. I just don't want to finance 20 or 30 k to find out it's not what we want.
 

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...

PS; Forgot to mention that the tires that you use need to be able to handle the weight load, especially the rear tire.
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Right. Along those lines, that's one reason so many tour bike riders use car tires on the backs of their bikes. They do that for better capacity, longer mileage, and less cost. One of the reasons I'll be putting one on my new 2018 Yamaha Eluder (a touring bagger) when the new tire wears out is that the one I have in mind (a Bridgestone DriveGuard) is also a run flat tire. Much safer.

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Right. Along those lines, that's one reason so many tour bike riders use car tires on the backs of their bikes. They do that for better capacity, longer mileage, and less cost. One of the reasons I'll be putting one on my new 2018 Yamaha Eluder (a touring bagger) when the new tire wears out is that the one I have in mind (a Bridgestone DriveGuard) is also a run flat tire. Much safer.

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Wow, didn't know that you purchased the new Eluder. I've been reading up on the bike, its a very cool looking luxury tourer with lots of bells and whistles. Love the four lights on the front of the fairing, kind of gives it a sinister look coming down the road.

As far as weight capacities again. I just looked it up on my old bike, the 2013 Triumph Trophy SE, it has a max weight carrying capacity of 527 LBS. I knew it was a lot, but I didn't realize it was that much until I just looked it up. An excerpt from Top Speeds Specs Page:

Even with its 649 pound dry weight, Triumph actually took significant steps to keep weight down, starting with the bones of the beast. Aluminum beams make up the twin-spar frame that not only carries the weight of the bike, but can support up to 527 pounds of some combination of rider/passenger/cargo, for a total well over the half-ton mark. Best of all, ride quality is electronically controlled, allowing you to adjust both front and rear for compression and rebound-damping, plus a hydraulic-preload function on the rear monoshock, and all at the touch of a button. Preset ride profiles (sport/normal/comfort) automatically set up the suspension values for quick changes on the fly.

 

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How do you like the Eluder Ronk? It is the newer version of my RSTD, but totally redone with a big twin.
 

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How do you like the Eluder Ronk? It is the newer version of my RSTD, but totally redone with a big twin.
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It's a totally different bike from my 2000 Road Stars. The engine refinements are superb, smooth, and tremendous torque in a wide range of rpm, but not a high rpm engine. I believe it pulls better than the 2005 Gold Wing I had. I don't even use it in "sport" mode as it's too easy to let the power on take off get away from you--really. Of course the electronics are much more modern with stuff displayed on the 7" screen. Lots of extras like alarm, linked brakes, ABS, cruise control, and on and on. But then it's going to be my longer trip bike. Rides like today's 220 miler will be on the RS.

Here's a link to a review:

https://www.cycleworld.com/2018-yamaha-star-eluder-first-ride

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· Administrator - American Legion Rider - KA5LRS
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That's a great bike Ron. But didn't you almost fall over with those round factory tires? If that bike had been available back in 16 I'm sure I would have had a very tough choice to make. Even today I look at that bike and wonder. Although I would have been looking at the Star Venture Touring with the tour pak. I had to add many things the Eluder comes stock with. Enjoy Ron. You may find it handles just as well with in town runs. I'm amazed how well this huge Indian handles in tight places and I bet the Eluder does as well. Despite the weight.:thumbsup:
 

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You'll want the front tire to have a load rating that's adequate too. When stopping there's a certain amount of weight that is transferred to the front tire, and it can be quite a lot. In some situations it's even possible to have 100% weight transfer to the front tire.
 

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That's a great bike Ron. But didn't you almost fall over with those round factory tires? If that bike had been available back in 16 I'm sure I would have had a very tough choice to make. Even today I look at that bike and wonder. Although I would have been looking at the Star Venture Touring with the tour pak. I had to add many things the Eluder comes stock with. Enjoy Ron. You may find it handles just as well with in town runs. I'm amazed how well this huge Indian handles in tight places and I bet the Eluder does as well. Despite the weight.:thumbsup:
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As to the tires being stock (for now) on the Eluder, yes, the bike does lean real well. I haven't totally perfected my slow u-turns in practice as I was waiting on getting my clear bra on it to help protect it if it touches the ground. Corners as well as a Gold Wing and more sharply than my Road Stars do. If you are referring to the difference in leaning with mc tires compared with car tires, there is no difference in anyone's experience. (Note: I don't want to keep hijacking this thread, so if anyone else has any questions or comments, maybe we should start another thread.)

One last thing, for those who aren't familiar with this bike, it's the bagger version (no rear seat perch with armrests and speakers) of the Star Venture. Both are top of the line touring bikes from Yamaha for 2018.

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As to the tires being stock (for now) on the Eluder, yes, the bike does lean real well. I haven't totally perfected my slow u-turns in practice as I was waiting on getting my clear bra on it to help protect it if it touches the ground. Corners as well as a Gold Wing and more sharply than my Road Stars do. If you are referring to the difference in leaning with mc tires compared with car tires, there is no difference in anyone's experience. (Note: I don't want to keep hijacking this thread, so if anyone else has any questions or comments, maybe we should start another thread.)

One last thing, for those who aren't familiar with this bike, it's the bagger version (no rear seat perch with armrests and speakers) of the Star Venture. Both are top of the line touring bikes from Yamaha for 2018.

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I thought they were the same bike Ron. One just had the tour pac/pak/trunk and passenger seat. Is that not true?
 

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I thought they were the same bike Ron. One just had the tour pac/pak/trunk and passenger seat. Is that not true?
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They are the same engine, frame, fairing, electronics and running gear. The differences are paint color, adjustable windshield, reverse gear, and larger passenger seat/armrests/speakers. Those extras come on the Venture.

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Usually you can add about 40 pounds for gas, oil, and coolant, plus the weight of your luggage and accessories. As you mentioned, most bikes are very conservative when it comes to safety factors, so I would feel pretty good about rolling on your Gold Wing with that weight. (Unless you have a crud-ton of luggage and a stuff in your saddle bags.)

It might be a good idea to check the load rating on your tires, too. Any tire recommended by the bike manufacturer is going to be okay. But a tire recommended for the bike by a tire maker might not always carry the load you want it to. I often see bikes where guys cheap out on tires to save a few bucks and end up really pushing things past the limits.
 

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................ that's one reason so many tour bike riders use car tires on the backs of their bikes. They do that for better capacity, longer mileage, and less cost. One of the reasons ....................... is also a run flat tire. Much safer.
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Yep, he said safety, car tire, motorcycle.

Don't do it kids, this is wrong.

I'm out.
 
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