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Veteran Member
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'S' for special? They had to do something to counter attack the 111ci Indians. I suspect it won't be long before the 110 is the standard HD engine.
 

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Save them all!
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Sounds fun!

One cylinder has more displacement than my entire cafe racer - even with the big bore kit. (That's 849cc)

That engine is only slightly smaller than what's in my old VW Bus.

Is it purely air cooled?
 

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American Legion Rider
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I suppose a 120 is coming for the touring models too. Heck, I don't need more than I have. Just loaded a new map in mine today and it screams. Well for a Harley anyway.:D Was cruising at 70, twisted the throttle to pass a slug and when I looked down I was at 95. Normally I'd be at 80. Wow! Put a little over a 100 miles on and check mileage. Yep, it's using fuel too.:D Went from 40 to 35. So I pulled the XIED's off. That should help but I think it's still going to be bad. There's a cost for fun.
 

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I suppose a 120 is coming for the touring models too. Heck, I don't need more than I have. Just loaded a new map in mine today and it screams. Well for a Harley anyway.:D Was cruising at 70, twisted the throttle to pass a slug and when I looked down I was at 95. Normally I'd be at 80. Wow! Put a little over a 100 miles on and check mileage. Yep, it's using fuel too.:D Went from 40 to 35. So I pulled the XIED's off. That should help but I think it's still going to be bad. There's a cost for fun.
In the old days, Harley guys I knew / rode with usually squeezed more out of every gallon of gas than their import counter parts. Not sure if that's the case any more or not. That 110 is sure a sharp looking engine though.
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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Some of the newer touring bikes have liquid-cooled heads. Many models are air/oil cooled.
I would not be surprised to see all the HD air cooled bikes go to the liquid cooled heads within the next five years.
 

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American Legion Rider
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No wonder I like mine. It's a 96. Not a wimpy 95.:D
 

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Wonder how it compares to the 113ci mill in my Raider?

I gotta hand it to Yamaha for balancing that engine so perfectly there is basically NO vibration to speak of, despite the huge coffee-can sized pistons
 

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American Legion Rider
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HC you are right. Typo
Just funnin' ya billo. Haven't you seen some of mine??? I throw some doozies out there.:D
 

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MODERATOR
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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
NordicMan, frankly, that new CVO series 110ci engine won't even compare at all to your Raider's engine. About the only thing in common is the V-twin and push-rods.

Dyno contests have proven that STOCK Harley's from EVO up, put out 40-45 rear wheel HP, from 1984 until 1999-2000 (?) when HD went to the Twin Cam. Still rear wheel HP was between 50-60. I don't believe that any of the big twins, even today aside from the CVO, 110ci engine bikes, put out more than 65 or so.

The 80 rear wheel HP is a step in the right direction but hardly laudable by todays standards. HD could add ported and polished 4 valve heads, dual injectors, as one for each cylinder, Light composite pistons and cylinders and an ECU that would allow more RPM's. Then of course a stronger clutch would be needed. I used Barnett Kevlar racing clutches on my builds.

Harley wants good torque and excellent fuel mileage and they have achieved that since Methuselah bought his first HD:biggrin:

Yamaha 1900 Raider:

"The 1,854 cc (113.1 cubic inches) four-stroke air-cooled V-twin engine was purpose-built to deliver maximum torque at 2,500 rpm in the 55 to 75 mph (90 to 120 km/h) range used for motorcycle cruising. Set at 48 degrees, the cylinders have a four pushrod valves, twin spark plug cylinder heads,[3] with forged pistons having an Alumite coating to reduce friction and ceramic-composite-coated cylinders.[2]

With an undersquare bore and stroke of 100mm (3.937 in) x 118mm (4.646 in), the engine has a compression ratio of 9.5:1 and is the first Yamaha cruiser motorcycle to be equipped with the compact Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve (EXUP) four-stroke power valve system previously only found on their line of high performance sports motorcycles.[2]

An unusual feature of the new engine is a special 'Pent-roof combustion chamber', designed to increase the efficiency of gas flow. The engine also has counter-rotating balancers on both ends of the crankshaft to reduce the vibration typical of large V-Twins.[4]

Horsepower is: 89.04 at 4,500 rpms (Stock)

Torque is: 114 lbs ft at 4,100 rpms (Stock)

PS: Ducati, even on their Supersport "streetbikes," with much smaller engines are within a few of 200 horsepower;)

Sam:biggrin:
 

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Premium Member
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PS: Ducati, even on their Supersport "streetbikes," with much smaller engines are within a few of 200 horsepower;)

Sam:biggrin:
Is that at something like 15000rpm?
 

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Troublemaker
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NordicMan, frankly, that new CVO series 110ci engine won't even compare at all to your Raider's engine. About the only thing in common is the V-twin and push-rods.

Dyno contests have proven that STOCK Harley's from EVO up, put out 40-45 rear wheel HP, from 1984 until 1999-2000 (?) when HD went to the Twin Cam. Still rear wheel HP was between 50-60. I don't believe that any of the big twins, even today aside from the CVO, 110ci engine bikes, put out more than 65 or so.

The 80 rear wheel HP is a step in the right direction but hardly laudable by todays standards. HD could add ported and polished 4 valve heads, dual injectors, as one for each cylinder, Light composite pistons and cylinders and an ECU that would allow more RPM's. Then of course a stronger clutch would be needed. I used Barnett Kevlar racing clutches on my builds.

Harley wants good torque and excellent fuel mileage and they have achieved that since Methuselah bought his first HD:biggrin:

Yamaha 1900 Raider:

"The 1,854 cc (113.1 cubic inches) four-stroke air-cooled V-twin engine was purpose-built to deliver maximum torque at 2,500 rpm in the 55 to 75 mph (90 to 120 km/h) range used for motorcycle cruising. Set at 48 degrees, the cylinders have a four pushrod valves, twin spark plug cylinder heads,[3] with forged pistons having an Alumite coating to reduce friction and ceramic-composite-coated cylinders.[2]

With an undersquare bore and stroke of 100mm (3.937 in) x 118mm (4.646 in), the engine has a compression ratio of 9.5:1 and is the first Yamaha cruiser motorcycle to be equipped with the compact Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve (EXUP) four-stroke power valve system previously only found on their line of high performance sports motorcycles.[2]

An unusual feature of the new engine is a special 'Pent-roof combustion chamber', designed to increase the efficiency of gas flow. The engine also has counter-rotating balancers on both ends of the crankshaft to reduce the vibration typical of large V-Twins.[4]

Horsepower is: 89.04 at 4,500 rpms (Stock)

Torque is: 114 lbs ft at 4,100 rpms (Stock)

PS: Ducati, even on their Supersport "streetbikes," with much smaller engines are within a few of 200 horsepower;)

Sam:biggrin:
The thing is, when you put a big engine together with less power, there is a lot less stress on all of the internal parts. This in theory should mean that the engine will last a lot longer, and go a lot farther. I think that is the reason you still see so many older HDs on the road. $ for mile, I think an HD is about the same cost as a metric if both are well taken care of throughout their life.

At this time, we are only at 21,000 trouble free miles on our Raider so there is no way to tell what the longevity of the engine will be. Hopefully it will go another 60,000 miles or so, that's how long it will be before I can afford to replace it.
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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9,208 Posts
The thing is, when you put a big engine together with less power, there is a lot less stress on all of the internal parts. This in theory should mean that the engine will last a lot longer, and go a lot farther. I think that is the reason you still see so many older HDs on the road. $ for mile, I think an HD is about the same cost as a metric if both are well taken care of throughout their life.

At this time, we are only at 21,000 trouble free miles on our Raider so there is no way to tell what the longevity of the engine will be. Hopefully it will go another 60,000 miles or so, that's how long it will be before I can afford to replace it.
Higher revving engines, such as the Gold Wing's flat 6, or the V-4 in the V-Max or Venture bikes, have been known to go well over 100k miles without any issues. And I have heard of many Harley engines with very similar mileage (or greater) reports.
 
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