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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am confronted with "myself," each time I get ready to go out and get on my bike.

My world is not just a "weekend warrior" world, in that I "ride" on any day above 45º F and likely clear weather and clear roads.

But there is another factor that I am very conscious of, as I am sure each of you are as well, and that is what kind of condition I am in. An obvious example is that of inebriation, but I'm not thinking along those lines. Anyone who would get in a car, or on a bike will intoxicated, is making a foolish choice, regardless.

For example, over the last three days, (I even stayed home from work yesterday, knowing that I was robbing myself of an extra day of hunting in November, since I have been saving my "time" for that hunting trip), I have been in lousy health. Little sleep, deep cough, congestion, etc..

Not only that, but the arthritis in my back that I have been told I have, has been aggravated lately by riding, and by lifting our seven month old granddaughter frequently, who is staying with us for a week or so. I'm in a great deal of pain.

So this morning, as I attempt to get myself back to work, I am making the very conscious choice to NOT ride the bike today, although the weather will be perfect for riding. Frustrating as it may be to me, I have to come face to face with myself honestly, and do the "right thing."

It is my belief that each of us has to make that choice, in a mature and responsible manner. If you can't be confidently sure that you are physically and mentally prepared to "ride" (and all that that en tales), it is best (imho) to be honest with yourself, and get in the truck, rather than on the bike (or whatever).

Even with regard to work. If it is better to stay home and recover in whatever way that requires, and sacrifice that extra couple of days for you hunting trip, ........probably also the better choice.

It's safer for you, and for others around you.

-Soupy
 

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Riding is very well a mental skill. I've been having the urge to ride to work. But I work third shift and I know there's been times I'm tired when I get out of work. Third shift life is so different from any other shift. There's days that life happens and I can't get much sleep before work. I know on these days, it wouldn't be a good idea to get on the bike in the morning when I'm tired, cause that's when I'm going to make mistakes. I like my drinks like everyone else. But I've made the decision, if I drink to hang the keys up. My best friend was worried when I first started riding because in many was him and I are so alike. When he first got his bike, he started going to the biker bars and well, lived it up. Then one day, he had a little too much and dropped the bike as he pulled in the driveway. He had to make the decision to sell the bike. He couldn't trust himself enough to stay in that type of lifestyle and be safe. He's worried that I'm gonna fall into the same trap. I had to promise him that I would never drink and ride. And that's one promise I will not break. I've got to admit, when I ride by the biker bars, I tend to get a little "oh, I wish I was there" but I just can't do it. Especially when a six pack would put me under the table......
 

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I'm 67 and have been riding since 1962 continuously and my Goldwing is my 76th bike/scooter and like you, I can see the writing on the wall as my health gets worse and my confidence lessens.

I was at one time the supreme optimist but not so much now. I had a double bypass a year ago and although my 'body' is doing great, my mind hasn't got the message yet.

Many in our age group are trying to extend our 'motorcycle experience' by going to 3 wheels or to scooters and their is a positive growth in both sectors.

I still ride often and my breakfast/ lunch rides about every other Saturday is usually about 150 miles solo. I bought the new Goldwing to ride to southern California to see my relatives and to also tour many of the beautiful adjacent states in Missouri BUT, I worry about breaking down, having a flat tire in the middle of nowhere etc and not being able to walk for miles if I had to! It may be irrational but I worry about things now that I never worried about before.

My ride to work is 12 miles one way through the beautiful country roads of SW Missouri and my ride of choice is my 500cc scooter, which is much more fun than the Wing.

Try a Maxi-scooter and see if it puts a big smile on your face! They will do 90% of everything a motorcycle will do and they are lighter, more maneuverable and easier to get on and off of.

Take care!

Sam:)
 

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Gone.
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I haven't had a drink while riding in maybe ten years or more. That sure doesn't keep me out of biker bars and from having a whale of a good time though. :biggrin:
 

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Good for you in making the decision to pass up enjoying one ride in exchange for many more to look forward to.
 

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if I gave up riding on a day I was in pain, I would never ride again....but that said, I agree with you....if I hurt enough not to ride, I just stay home (being disabled and not having a job, that's easy to do) but at the same time, I don't care if it's raining (not a torrential rain) I'll still go out for a bit....

a lot of my rides are to the grocery store, people always ask why I take the bike because I can only fit so much on it (saddle bags and a luggage rack with a net helps) and have to go more often....I just tell them it gives me more reasons to ride (and I don't own a 4 wheeled vehicle...well not that's licensed and runs anyway, I still own my '63 Ford Galaxie)
 

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I am 57 and do not want to think about the day I can no longer ride. I have been riding to work almost every day since 2005. I have not had a drink and got on my bike in almost 30 years.

It seems no matter how much discomfort or pain I am in, it all seems to go away when I ride. However when I get off the bike, the pain comes back.

So the answer, RIDE!! :71baldboy:
 

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We all have our comfort zone. There is no issue with recognizing that. None of us like to admit that we have limitations. Maturity allows us to see the big picture.
 

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I don't get it.......Riding causes too much pain
So you don't ride
Therefore it is maturity

Acting in a way that is forced on you is called maturity????????

Oh I get it now, maturity = old

Yes if riding a bike causes too much pain to ride, it is most likely maturity.

Or as I've said before, its time to invest in a new seat. I know its hard for a mature person to believe a seat makes a world of difference but it does.
 

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This thread is depressing. Was that what it was started for? I think it was know if you are mentally prepared for a ride. I'm different than a lot. The ONLY time I'm not in pain is when I'm riding. My pain management physician totally understands why. It's simple because I'm focused so much on control of the bike at any given instant that I have no room for anything else. Maybe I concentrate too much. Well it works. Maybe you all should think more about what you are doing.

Yes, there are times my head is not in it. I've turned around more than a few times because I knew I wasn't concentrating on riding. Too many pain pills or too much pain, who knows. I just knew within a mile or two I just should not be riding. At 67 and well over 500k miles, I don't have to prove an dang thing. But even before I got near that many miles, I knew when not to ride. Isn't that what this thread was about? Not old age problems.

Maybe I should start a geriatric riders thread.:D
 

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Nah. First is carrying a cane strapped there. That's what I've been doing the last 2 years. I'm now looking for one that has a seat. And I'll be darned if they don't make one. We do have a guy with the Legion Riders that shows up on his trike with a walker. So maybe I'll be following in his footsteps. But he's an old fart. 69 compared to my 67.:D
 

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Keep your eyes open kid. You'll soon know where that noise is coming from. Now me, I'm going in for a new right front ball joint!
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #16
I am 57................................It seems no matter how much discomfort or pain I am in, it all seems to go away when I ride. However when I get off the bike, the pain comes back..........
I m 57 as well.

I wasn't trying to create a depressing thread. Sorry bout that. I was just offering some experiential perspective that said, "it's the mature biker" that knows when to NOT ride, if he/she can't ride safely.

Because I've been so sick the last couple of days, I knew it would be safer for me and everyone else around me, to stay on four wheels til my inner gyro gets back to normal.

you are right about the pain though......it DOES go away when I ride (amazing as that is)!

-soupy
 

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If I don't feel 100% I don't ride. Riding takes your full focus, and feeling crappy can make that difficult or impossible. I've been through quintuple bypass, bilateral knee reacements, four eye surgery procedures, lung surgery and other challenges. But mostly I still can ride and do so safely. When I get to where I cant, I will go to a trike or a scooter. After my knee surgery I bought a Silverwing. What is important to me is to keep riding as long as I can.
 

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Well said in your original post Soupy. If I feel crook and that'll affect my riding then I don't get on the bike.

And I don't drink alcohol if I'm riding my bike! If I'm riding the next day I'll even limit what I drink, and how late I'll drink it, the night before. I'll go into a pub on a ride, but I'll drink tonic water with ice and a slice of lemon - now that's really refreshing on a hot day. Never had anyone comment on my choice of drink either.

I'm lucky (he says, touching the wooden desk) not to have any age related aches and pains yet. I'm 66, and feeling the way I do now I expect to be riding on 2 wheels til I'm 70 or more.

My bike choice may change as I get older. I'm finding the ST1100 a little heavy now but I have a device to help wheel it around in confined spaces. Maybe I'll move down to a mid-size cruiser as I get older, and fit it with a pair of panniers, something in the 800 to 1100 cc range. My wife would like me to get a Honda F6B, but I feel it'll be too heavy for me. My ST1100 is about 300 kg/660 lb. and an F6B is around 380 kg/840 lb. My Suzuki Boulevard M50 was 260 kg/590 lb. and I found that very easy to wheel and park.
 

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I find my 750lb Thunderbird easier to handle than was my 550lb America, both from Triumph. When I demo rode a Victory Cross Country, which I think weighs about the same as my bike, it felt much more ponderous and challenging to handle.
 

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Keep your eyes open kid. You'll soon know where that noise is coming from. Now me, I'm going in for a new right front ball joint!
LOL! Great reply, and good luck with the ball joint replacement!

(I've been told I'll need my left upper one replaced too, but they only just recently finished rebuilding my grill and a few other parts.)
 
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