Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After fixing my '82 Yamaha Maxim, I proceeded to attempt to ride it. I'll be honest, I'm very new and awful at shifting, so PLEASE don't give me crud. I managed to shift into first after a few failed attempts, which usually entailed me having no clue on how to use the clutch, and having a massive power surge and lurch type effect. After riding a few minutes on the farm, I stopped , then proceeded to roll the bike back down my drive way, and try to turn it on. The same thing happened. The bike simply lurched forward. I simply have no clue how to properly shift on anything other than a basic 4 wheeler... After one particularly hard lurch forward and the bike dying, I attempted to turn it back over... which did not work. The starter did not even turn. Signs of power moving was there, as the lights dimmed slightly when I pressed the starter, only no turning over. What did I do wrong? (probably everything...), what's wrong? And how can I fix it?!

Thank you so much, please keep in mind I'm a self proclaimed noob, so I'd appreciate it if you don't hack on me... :plain:

-Garret :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
It's basically like driving a standard shift car. Squeeze clutch in - shift into first gear - ease clutch out while gently applying throttle to keep from stalling and to start moving. Easy peasy - once you've got the hang of it.

If you're saying you pull in the clutch and can't easily shift into first gear without the bike lurching forward, then it sounds like a possible clutch adjustment problem or worn clutch. Keep in mind I'm not a mechanic though, and other more experienced folks here may have better answers.

The power issue: Did you check the battery charge? If you were trying to ride and kept stalling, all of the restarts could have drained the battery.


Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Gone
Joined
·
23,907 Posts
My guess is that you are simply letting go of the clutch when the motorcycle starts to move forward rather than easing it out and using the friction zone to gradually apply power to the rear wheel.

Let the motorcycle move at least 20 feet before the clutch is completely released.

The motorcycle likely won't start because the battery is now too low to turn the engine. Charge it on a tender.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
Check out this video on shifting and clutching by Capt. Crash Idaho on youtube.


While you're there, check out the rest of his videos. Very informative and entertaining!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top