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Discussion Starter #1
So l want to do a handlebar riser on my bike, it is an '04 SV650 for anyone who doesn't know me. I have been thinking all along that l would just buy the kit, but the kit is close to $500 and tbh, it just doesn't look like all that much stuff. A handlebar, a couple of braided brake lines, and a new triple clamp with bar holders bolted on. So l started looking around.

I found the braided steel brake lines on Ebay. I figured that l would just buy them for a V-Strom since they need to be longer. Can l do this or would they not be interchangeable from one bike to the next? Any thoughts on this?

The kit didn't call for a throttle cable or a clutch cable...this suggests to me that the stock cables are long enough.

It appears as though the triple clamp in the kit is basically a stock triple clamp with threads tapped in, and then bar holders bolted on. I was actally thinking it might be better to weld them on. Any pros or cons to this?

Anyone have a suggestion on good handlebars to buy? Any reason not to buy them used if there is a parts bike in the area?

Any other tips and/or suggestions regarding this project would be super helpful. Thanks!!!
 

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The only thing I know about your bike is that it is yellow, so I can only make some broad suggestions based on experience with the bikes I do know something about. So, take this for what it's worth...

The kit didn't call for a throttle cable or a clutch cable...this suggests to me that the stock cables are long enough.
The best way to make sure is to unbolt the bars you have and hold them so the hand controls are in the approximate position you want them to be when you're done. There shouldn't be any pulling or resistance felt from the cables. Next, with the front of the bike blocked up off the ground, have a helper turn the front wheel slowly to the full lock position both right and left. If there's resistance from the cables, or you notice any sharp bends or kinking, you will need longer ones. The wheel must steer freely from side to side and it should be easy to hold the bars in the approximate position.

It appears as though the triple clamp in the kit is basically a stock triple clamp with threads tapped in, and then bar holders bolted on. I was actally thinking it might be better to weld them on. Any pros or cons to this?
I'm not familiar with the design of your bike but you want to approach something like that carefully. Will the welding heat warp something out of alignment or cause a change in the properties or temper of the metal that could effect strength or resistance to cracking?

Anyone have a suggestion on good handlebars to buy? Any reason not to buy them used if there is a parts bike in the area?
If you go with used bars check them carefully for any twist or signs that the bike was dropped. Also look carefully for any stress cracks. They usually form around any drillings or openings in the bars for wiring and near where the bars were clamped.

Any other tips and/or suggestions regarding this project would be super helpful. Thanks!!!
If you have to extend the wiring use heat shrink tubing over soldered connections. Don't go cheap and use crimped connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The only thing I know about your bike is that it is yellow, so I can only make some broad suggestions based on experience with the bikes I do know something about. So, take this for what it's worth...



The best way to make sure is to unbolt the bars you have and hold them so the hand controls are in the approximate position you want them to be when you're done. There shouldn't be any pulling or resistance felt from the cables. Next, with the front of the bike blocked up off the ground, have a helper turn the front wheel slowly to the full lock position both right and left. If there's resistance from the cables, or you notice any sharp bends or kinking, you will need longer ones. The wheel must steer freely from side to side and it should be easy to hold the bars in the approximate position.



I'm not familiar with the design of your bike but you want to approach something like that carefully. Will the welding heat warp something out of alignment or cause a change in the properties or temper of the metal that could effect strength or resistance to cracking?



If you go with used bars check them carefully for any twist or signs that the bike was dropped. Also look carefully for any stress cracks. They usually form around any drillings or openings in the bars for wiring and near where the bars were clamped.



If you have to extend the wiring use heat shrink tubing over soldered connections. Don't go cheap and use crimped connectors.

Thanks for the ideas/suggestions/insight. After looking into individual parts last night, it looks like l might save some money going this route, but maybe not enough to be worth the headache. The kit just comes with everything you need. Once l have done it then it will make a lot more sense and l could probably do it differently next time. What you said about compromising the integrity of the triple clamp really resonates with me though. I think l should go the safe route
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Are you sure you won't have to remove the cowling to fit full bars? The diagrams at PartsOutlaw show the full bars on the 'without cowling' model. In any case, you can determine the total parts list from the diagrams there, including if the cables are long enough by matching part numbers:
http://www.partsoutlaw.com/oemparts/#/l/suz/508b26e0f87002353072442e/2004-sv650-parts
It appears as though if you pull the bars back along with moving them up it will clear the cowling just fine

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/decosse01/SV650S/bars/P8220002.jpg

Thanks for the parts link! I think that will really come in handy!!!
 
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