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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I've FINALLY worked my fingers to nubs and have earned enough cash to buy a motorcycle for a steal and still fulfill obligations! As of yesterday, I am a motorcycle owner. Problem is, I'm 6'7 and 280lbs. And the bike is a '95 Virago xv750. This is my first bike, and I love it despite size. When I was a younger teenager, I tasted first blood with a little 125cc dirt bike (which looked silly at the time too) and haven't rode a two wheeled machine until yesterday.

The virago is amazing! People say I look a little funny on a small bike but it really does react great. The seat is murder, though, thinking about getting it upholstered professionally. The controls were obviously made for shorter people. I wish the controls were set a bit more forward and the handlebar was at a lesser angle, caveats due to my size. I think the first upgrade will be engine guards to kind of beef up the head on silhouette of the narrower virago, and protect the girl from a spill... knocking on wood.

So none of my family rides. I don't really know any current bike riders. So I've gone against recommendations of a lot of non-riders getting this bike, but I did it and I did it alone!

I'm parking it through the winter (in a small storage building/workshop) so I can completely inspect every inch of it, know it like an extension of my own body, and most importantly, clean everything! So i'm not riding much more than down the road and to the gas station... actually.. I will need a permit, and much, much more. It's a long road until it'll be my getaway sometime early next year, but I plan on absorb all cycle information starting now so I am prepared!

any other Virago owners or tall riders? (6'7 here) :thumbsup:
 

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The handlebars may be able to be rotated forward a bit to give you more arm room.

Make sure you winterize the motorcycle properly by treating the fuel with a stabilizer and keeping a tender on the battery to insure a trouble-free start-up next year. A few dollars now can save many hundreds later in preventable repairs.
 

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Welcome to the Forum. Congratulations to you for getting your bike. Have you taken the BRC? If not, I highly recommend taking it when you get ready to start riding on a regular basis. It will teach you the basics you need to start with. It really helped me and I had ridden before. Good Luck and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Moni: Every intention to take the BRC, there's quite a discount on my insurance for those who have taken the class. I imagine I would have a rough time just assuming to know everything about such a engineered vehicle

Dodsfall: my plan was to turn it over once or twice a week, but I wouldn't want to risk ruining the gas and clogging a line if I didn't start it during the frigid months. Thanks for the tip
 

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It's not really a good idea to run the engine unnecessarily. The tank should remain full help prevent corrosion inside, and starting the engine without bringing it up to operating temperature in cold weather can cause problems with condensation. There is no advantage to turning the engine over while in storage.

A quality battery tender attached to the battery to keep it topped off and a fuel system full of stabilized fuel will keep the motorcycle in prime condition without the need for added labor over the winter.

A dry, sheltered storage area is all that's really needed beyond that.
 

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SG, take the basic course. I would say that if you can't pass it you have no business on a bike. I know that sounds harsh but I believe it is true. In that case you could sell off your bike before it became a financial burden on you. If you pass the course it may give you a small amount of insight into what riding is all about. It will not make you an experienced rider but will at least give you skills that you can build on to become a competent rider.
I hope this does not sound as negative as I feel it may but until you have at least mastered the skills they teach in the basic course, you have no business riding anything at all. I have been riding for over 47 years and took that course only 6 years ago. I found that what they were teaching was about 80% what I already knew as a regular rider and the important part, the 20% that improved my actual skills. For me that last bit was the entire value of the course and even that small bit was important enough that I would gladly pay for it again to learn those few things.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I got a battery tender and have began the process of polishing the chrome and topping off fluids/flushing fluids. A bottle of fuel stabilizer is awaiting colder months. Thanks again for the wisdom.

Oldman47, again I have every intention of taking a course. Regarding my business of riding anything at all or not, I test drove the bike, dragging the tips of my work boots and wobbling side to side flirting with laying her down. Since then, I've driven the bikes a few times, against the same advice that told me not to purchase the vehicle in the same place. Yes I admit I've released the clutch too quickly and stalled out once or twice. Yes I've made simple mistakes that, had I been in traffic, could have cost me the motorcycle and worse. I am learning! When I think about how irresponsible I am sometimes for travelling a quarter mile (gasp: without a helmet!) to the gas station and back to my house, I imagine I could do worse, but just barely. This is part of the allure to me; I've come of age to make my decisions with my life, despite how naive my justifications might be to others, and can take my own course of actions. "Young and dumb" comes to mind when I think how I feel when I ride a motorcycle, but inside I'm an old soul, responsible enough to have the self control not to run out, grab a permit and tag, and jump on the interstate. Ignorance or not, it's choice that makes life enjoyable. ;)

Thank you all for the suggestions and wisdom. I'm learning more and more each day, becoming a more confident bike *OWNER* and soon to be commuting, competent rider
 

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No reason to apologize for being enthusiastic. My bet is that anyone here will understand that sentiment. I just want to encourage you not to get too far ahead of your present skill level. The basic rider course will actually give you skills that you can then build on. Until you have some formal instruction you will not even know what your particular weak spots are. To me that is dangerous. You may feel a need to develop a good feel for the clutch when your main need is to understand proper braking techniques, or maybe the exact opposite. Who knows until a professional evaluates your present knowledge.
 

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Welcome from Pa

I'm 6'6" riding a 650 V-Star, the younger brother of your bike.

The first thing I did was remove the factory saddle and replace it with a mustang seat. The second thing I did was add 2" extensions and reposition the handlebars.

Good luck
 

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Eating GSXRs, Sh***ing CBRs
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Welcome from Michigan! Viragos are great bikes. I have a bobber built out of an '84 Virago 1000. Very easy bikes to work on. I have 16" apes on mine. Maybe a set of those would help your riding position?
 
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