Motorcycle Forum banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
I purchased a phone case for my iphone that attaches to the handle bars. I just set my destination on my google map and give it a good read before I head out. Just to give me a good sense of where to turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
I have been using a GPS for the past 9 years. Ridden to 49 states and parts of Canada with no problems. The GPS has found some interesting roads.

No sound, I just glance at it the same as a speedometer.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,906 Posts
The modern GPS/mapping systems for smart phones, like Google Maps and Waze really are amazing with their verbal directions. They have come a long, long way in the last few years.

They are very clear and give directions well ahead of time and then repeated directions when you get close to a turn off.

I see no problem with piping these verbal directions into a helmet.

I also agree with the comments above that using these verbal directions may actually be safer then having to search for signs and roadways. Especially in complicated areas like big cities. all you have to do is follow the voice in your head :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
I guess I'll buy the argument ... provided the instructions are given well BEFORE you need to do the turn, or take an exit. Our car system GPS is not always early enough with those calls.

AND providing ... that you NEVER think about the GPS system.
meaning - that you never find yourself saying ... "Darn, that voice is not loud enough - I need to adjust the volume", or ... "Darn, I didnt get that last message. I need to push a button and get her to repeat the instruction".

BECAUSE the minute that you start fooling with the system like that ... you ARE diluting your focus on the outside world.

just my $0.02

dT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,331 Posts
A little off topic, but if you decide to buy a motorcycle specific GPS device, i.e., Garmin Zumo, I have a suggestion as to which model NOT to buy. I wanted a Zumo, and because I have had good experiences with Nuvi models for my cars, I was expecting Garmin to match their marketing with the actual performance of the product and I was wrong. Because the Zumo models are expensive, I bought the least expensive one I could find, the 220. This is a model I highly recommend you NOT buy. It has a small screen (3.5 inch) and the volume of the sound is insufficient to be heard while on a motorcycle (except at very low speeds where there is no wind noise to contend with). Despite the Garmin claims that the screen is bright enough to see in sunlight on a motorcycle, I find that most of the time during daylight hours the glare on the screen makes it very difficult to discern details (such as street names). This problem disappears at night. I use it when I need to get to a location quickly, or when I am anywhere and just want to find my way home. For these purposes it is very useful. But there is no way on this model to download a planned route, and when I ride I do not necessarily want to go the shortest or fastest route.

For power (since the internal battery lasts at most about 2 hours), I have a Powerlet oulet on the handlebars that I keep the GPS plugged in. It is wired so that power only runs to the outlet when the engine is on.

If I ever buy another GPS it would be one of the larger and more expensive models. My old 220 was $400, the latest Zumo is about $700, but with a large screen and the ability to take downloaded routes from my computer it would be much better than what I own now. All of the Zumos are built to handle the vibration of a bike and to be waterproof, and in that regard my Zumo has been totally fine.

Something to keep in mind if you often are really in the boonies. With a phone GPS system you need to be receiving a cellular signal, since the maps are not stored in the phone. With a separate GPS such as the Garmin Zumo the maps are in the device and the data that tells the device where you are at any moment is coming via satellite, so as long as you have a view of the sky you will not get lost.
 

·
It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
Joined
·
8,668 Posts
I have been using a GPS for the past 9 years. Ridden to 49 states and parts of Canada with no problems. The GPS has found some interesting roads.

No sound, I just glance at it the same as a speedometer.

Underachiever!!!! Why only 49 of the 50 states??:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
A little off topic, but if you decide to buy a motorcycle specific GPS device, i.e., Garmin Zumo, I have a suggestion as to which model NOT to buy. I wanted a Zumo, and because I have had good experiences with Nuvi models for my cars, I was expecting Garmin to match their marketing with the actual performance of the product and I was wrong. Because the Zumo models are expensive, I bought the least expensive one I could find, the 220. This is a model I highly recommend you NOT buy. It has a small screen (3.5 inch) and the volume of the sound is insufficient to be heard while on a motorcycle (except at very low speeds where there is no wind noise to contend with). Despite the Garmin claims that the screen is bright enough to see in sunlight on a motorcycle, I find that most of the time during daylight hours the glare on the screen makes it very difficult to discern details (such as street names). This problem disappears at night. I use it when I need to get to a location quickly, or when I am anywhere and just want to find my way home. For these purposes it is very useful. But there is no way on this model to download a planned route, and when I ride I do not necessarily want to go the shortest or fastest route.

For power (since the internal battery lasts at most about 2 hours), I have a Powerlet oulet on the handlebars that I keep the GPS plugged in. It is wired so that power only runs to the outlet when the engine is on.

If I ever buy another GPS it would be one of the larger and more expensive models. My old 220 was $400, the latest Zumo is about $700, but with a large screen and the ability to take downloaded routes from my computer it would be much better than what I own now. All of the Zumos are built to handle the vibration of a bike and to be waterproof, and in that regard my Zumo has been totally fine.

Something to keep in mind if you often are really in the boonies. With a phone GPS system you need to be receiving a cellular signal, since the maps are not stored in the phone. With a separate GPS such as the Garmin Zumo the maps are in the device and the data that tells the device where you are at any moment is coming via satellite, so as long as you have a view of the sky you will not get lost.
Yeah I agree. I was shopping/comparing motorcycle GPS's for quite a while before making a purchase decision. Frankly the Garmin Zumo's confuse me because they just seemed so damned expensive for no apparent reason, and because they are "purpose built" for motorcycling, they are basically useless for anything else.. And I use GPS quite a bit, not just motorcycling.

I decided to grab a Garmin Montana 600 for the bike. They're certainly not "cheap" either, but at least they are multipurpose devices. I paid just under $600 taxes in & delivered for a "bundle" consisting of the GPS, the maps, the powered cradle, and a motorcycle RAM mount. The Montana is a totally weatherproof outdoor rated device, and the battery will last for a very long time. It does get charged whenever it is in the cradle mount. And in a pinch you can pop out the square battery & replace it with 3 AAA batteries.

The 1 thing the Zumo has that the Montana doesn't is a wireless bluetooth audio feed. The Montana has a wired/headphone connection option only. This alone certainly isn't worth paying way more for a Zumo.. IMO

Yes modern GPS devices have a very refined interface. It only takes a casual periodic glance at the display to clearly and easily see your next upcoming turn. Of course everyone is entitled to their preference, but I can't imagine how it could be "safer or easier" to periodically pull over and memorize your next few turns off a paper map. Then drive for a while, and repeat that over & over. What if you miss a memorized turn? Modern GPS's automatically recalculate and quickly tell you the NEXT turn you should take. With a paper map you'd have to pull over AGAIN & recalculate after missing a turn..

Here's the Montana 600 on my Raider :)



One of the biggest "negatives" I can say is true for using GPS devices is, a rider can become very dependant on them, to the point of not being able to drive simple routes without the GPS. It's kinda like using speed dial on Smartphones.. There are some people I call fairly regularly, but right this second I can't think of what their actual phone # is :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,331 Posts
What model Zumo is that? I like the super large screen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
You folks must be more disciplined than I am.

If I had a large pretty GPS screen sitting on the dash of my bike
there's no way that I wouldn't wind up glancing at it ... now and then.

any time that you GLANCE away from the road ahead
you are taking your attention off the road and the traffic.
you might say to yourself ... well its only for a second.
but really its one second to see the screen - and then another second to re-orient your brain to the road again. that's two seconds lost.

two seconds might not be important at all on a long open road.
but two seconds could be critical if you have cross traffic ahead.

just something to think about.

BTW, I don't look at my speedometer - hardly ever.
and I don't have a tach.
you can tell everything you need by the sound of the rpm's and your gear setting.

I know I sound like an old dinosaur.
but this is the reason why ... I lived to be an old dinosaur :)

cheers,
dT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
I also enjoy Iron Butt rides (18 so far) and the GPS helps me plan the rides.

I have all of the gas stops planned on the IBA rides, this lets me extend my fuel stops and I can monitor my progress. The gas stops also create the route.

I did this ride in April, it was my longest "day ride".

I'm not ready to slow down yet. I'm only 60.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
would suggest that you think hard about this ...

it would be very hard to maintain 100% focus on the road ... with this kind of stuff being piped into your helmet.

I have just been reading a book about WHY people believe they SEE and KNOW more about the world around them - than they actually do. Basically, our intuition is lying to us - it is wrong. We see far less than we think we do. It gets a lot worse when we have extra inputs from phones and GPS devices.

Its just a suggestion.
take it FWIW.

cheers,
dT

I am new hear, so please don't be offended. I have been riding a long time. I commute and I also ride with a club on weekends sometime weekend trips. We are a fast paced club. Many of our riders have ZERO chicken strips on the tires. Most ride with some kind of music. I use a Garmin Zumo 665LM so I can listen to XM satellite radio while riding. Our brains are very interesting. When just riding along to and from work I listen to the music while still paying full attention to the traffic and side streets. When riding with my club when we start pushing the limits of the bikes and you need to concentrate more on your riding it is amazing that my brain automatically tunes out the music and I forget all about it until I slow down and just start cruising again then I realize I have music on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
I think that's a fair comment. And I think your experience is valid .. meaning that if you say that the music and GPS is not bothering you - then probably its not.

where I think these instruments go wrong .. is when they foul up. all of this electronics messes up from time to time. music players - suddenly stop playing songs. GPS instruments suddenly stop giving directions - for NO apparent reason. The problem is ... we're riding along and we really don't want to interrupt our ride to deal with a "stupid" instrumentation problem. so we start fooling with the music player, or the GPS, while we are riding (or at least I don't ... but it is a temptation for you). And that gets us into serious problems because then our brain REALLY is diverted ... and not paying attention to the road. OK, this stuff might be very infrequent, but it does happen.

so I would say that if you're super-disciplined and you really will STOP and deal with electronics problems, by pulling over to the side of the road. then probably you are OK. but if there's temptation to handle it "on the fly" ... then that represents a real danger.

again, just my $0.02

dT
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top