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I'm contemplating going carless, and just use motorcycles. has anyone done this? my thinking is the things I do that require a car:

groceries
road trips
taking girls out (in the near future hopefully)
moving furniture
taking my bicycle to places
rain protection

I was thinking I could get a klr with big saddle bags to carry groceries, rig up a bike rack for it to take it to races, and possibly keep my sv650 as a street bike, because the insurance is cheap.

what am I missing?
 

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Just curious.....where do you Live??
Reason I ask is.....Does it SNOW there?
If yes, how would you handle that?
Good Luck!!
Ed
 

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I was thinking the same thing. Not just the snow, but how is the weather in general where you live ?How often does it rain ?
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I have a two seat sports car can't carry anything in it
A bike, can carry even less in it

So I have a truck for all those other days. Does that make me carless?
 

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With all respect, I think it's stupid to not have a car. A bike can only do so much.

If you live within walking distance to work, in a small community where all you need is there, then go for it.

Sam:biggrin:
 

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I live in the southeast U.S. (North Carolina at present) and when I was younger, there were times when I went for a year or two at a time with a motorcycle as my primary transportation. It can be done! At least in certain regions with more moderate weather.

When I needed to carry something that was too large or impractical to carry on my bike, I would have to ask family or friends to help me out. Of course, I would give them gas money and help them out in other ways, in return.

Most of the time when I only had a motorcycle for transportation, I had a roommate who owned a car - but not always. In cases like that, it was simple to just ask "The next time you are going to (the grocery store, WallyWorld, the mall, whatever) can I ride along with you?" Of course there were times when I would need to go sooner than later, so that was where gas money came in. If you're just riding along with your roommate to somewhere they are already going, it's usually not a big deal - if you are friends with them.
 

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I'm contemplating going carless, and just use motorcycles. has anyone done this? my thinking is the things I do that require a car:

groceries
road trips
taking girls out (in the near future hopefully)
moving furniture
taking my bicycle to places
rain protection

I was thinking I could get a klr with big saddle bags to carry groceries, rig up a bike rack for it to take it to races, and possibly keep my sv650 as a street bike, because the insurance is cheap.

what am I missing?
I have been without a car for about seven years. I had a motorcycle for two of those years, until it was wrecked (not my fault). Going without a car is definitely not for everyone, but it has benefits.

I chose this path mostly to save money. I used the savings to buy a condo, and then started putting money in the bank and saving for retirement. My financial goals were accomplished beyond my expectations.

My secondary goal was to train for cycling events, which also went beyond my expectations. I finished many long distance time trials, up to 300 miles in a day, and some multi-day events, riding almost non-stop for 3 days! I lost over 100 pounds and got into shape.

There are some difficulties, and you can take them as hardships or challenges, which will determine how much you enjoy the lifestyle and how long you might stick it out.

You'll want to invest in some good rain gear, of course, and hopefully you don't have to deal with snow (I'm in Florida). You may find the need to make many small shopping trips instead of a few big ones. I learned I could do without soda or bottled water, as it's much easier to transport tea and coffee and brew it at home (and cheaper!). Another shopping strategy is to borrow or rent a car every few months or so and really stock up on bulky or heavy non-perishables, like paper towels, canned goods and such.

You can rent a car or truck every now and then for vacations, special events, major purchases, etc. And you can order dinner to be delivered once in a while (some places have grocery delivery, though I don't have that option). I haven't called a taxi in the whole seven years, but the option is there. I occasionally ride the bus. I have a golf cart which I can ride to lots of useful places in my new neighborhood at the condo, although this would not be practical in most locations.


If the decision is important to you, then your family and your real friends should accept it. But don't be a mooch! I never ask for rides, though I occasionally accept an offer from the family. Be creative and you can get around most of the possible problems most of the time. I've never missed work because I had no car, even when I rode my bicycle 15 miles each way. You can do it if the reason for doing it is important enough to you, and if you go at it with the right attitude.

Good luck if you try. My best advice is to calculate the money you would have spent on a car and set it aside for big goals; it adds up quickly. Also, remember that your attitude is important.
 

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If you can ride 99% of the time and live in a place with cab service, just take a cab 3 or 4 days a year and enjoy your ride. In my real world, no way can I ride that often. For me a car or small pickup is essential. There is no public transport here.
 

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I've only got my bike, been that way for a couple years now. Makes some things more difficult, but it's worth it. Saves me money when I go grocery shopping, because I only buy what I can carry.
 

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I couldn't do it, for several reasons.

A) I live in Missouri. I need 4x4 access at constant ready.

B) I tend to haul everything from groceries, to loads of wood, and home improvement materials. I know not of any bike capable of pulling a load of 10 or so bags of quikcrete.

C) I'm as passionate about my Mustang, as I am my bike. I've said it clearly that the only way I'll ever get rid of it, is to get another one.

D) A bike can only accommodate a +1. I sometimes have to accommodate +3.

E) I've always seen bikes as "grown ups toys". Never as primaries / daily drivers.
 

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I had only a bike for about five years at one point, but I was younger and single. You can do it, but it makes certain things a pain, like groceries and stuff. A lot of it will depend on your age, where you live, your job, what kind of stores/services are in the immediate area, etc.
 
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