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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here's a picture of our Great White (2005 Honda Goldwing) and her buddy, Old Blue (2005 Aspen Sentry M/C camper), at Greyeagle, California on our way to motorcycle rally this summer in North Carolina ......

Why would anyone need more? We pulled her 8500 miles this summer with no problems, no hassles..... Over the winter, I'll rebuild the wheels and install some mods I've been thinking about, but not many mods....she already meets our needs! We had a 21' San Juan sailboat once that an old salt said "was more boat than 99% of all sailors need!" We feel the same way about Old Blue. We doubt that people in $300,000 motorhomes have that much more fun than we do in our $3K trailer...... Work yourself to death and go big, or work less and go small..... you pays your money, you makes your choices!






And here's all my favorite things.... Great White, Old Blue, and my Magnificent Red....all packed up and on the road!

 

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We feel the same, mostly. The less 'stuff' we haul, the better the trip. We don't have a trailer, and we decided against it, after giving it careful thought. The prices of campgrounds have grown so high that we prefer to just motel it: better accommodations, safer, out of the weather, don't need to stop as early as there is no 'set-up' required.

We do miss camping, but on the bike, we like to travel as light as possible. We've learned to reduce what we take, even using sink-washable T-shirts (Under Armor, and knock-off's: wick away sweat, keeping us dry and comfortable), as well as the lowers, made from same/similar materials. They can be washed with hand soap, air-dried overnight, and re-used the next day -- according to the maker... In reality, they need to air-dry more than one night, so a second pair is required. Other than that, they work quite well. May sound unpleasant, but the reality is that it drastically reduces our inventory of clothing carried, and they are actually quite comfortable, as they keep you dry inside of your armored riding jacket, and pants, avoiding rashes and such.

We ride a '93 Voyager XII, so we have decent stowage on the bike. We did, however, break down and buy a trailer hitch, along with a small cooler carrier for the hitch. We found that we really wanted to be able to carry sandwich meat, drinks, and such, for lunches along the way when touring -- we can only tolerate so much restaurant food on a 7+ Day tour. Without a cooler, we would end up throwing out anything we did not eat at each stop. With the cooler on the hitch rack, we can stop anywhere it is safe to do so, and enjoy a leisurely picnic with some cold drinks. And that is a lot of fun, all by itself. YMMV. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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Ok, I've got to ask.......how does the bike handle hauling that nice trailer? I don't think I've ever seen a bike haul something like that. You must get alot of people giving you all kinds of looks.

The neatest thing that I have ever seen on a bike is a side car that had a ramp on the back that allowed the lady who was in a wheelchair to get in the side car, lock in and enjoy the ride. I thought that was simply amazing.

I miss camping. I used to own a trailer at a campground in upper NY state. Had so many good times with the kids, and they always slept so well at night. It felt so nice to be out of touch with the rest of the world, carefree and fun!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, I've got to ask.......how does the bike handle hauling that nice trailer? I don't think I've ever seen a bike haul something like that. You must get alot of people giving you all kinds of looks.

The neatest thing that I have ever seen on a bike is a side car that had a ramp on the back that allowed the lady who was in a wheelchair to get in the side car, lock in and enjoy the ride. I thought that was simply amazing.

I miss camping. I used to own a trailer at a campground in upper NY state. Had so many good times with the kids, and they always slept so well at night. It felt so nice to be out of touch with the rest of the world, carefree and fun!!
Many, many Goldwingers haul camping trailers..... and the bike handles just fine..... some Goldwingers put swiveling hitches on their bikes, and the bike handles even better. In the circles we travel in, we don't get very many strange looks at all!:)
 

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The advantages of the GoldWing are its power and its weight. The trailer fully loaded probably weighs about 650#.

Last summer I pulled one with my RoadStar, but it has 60% of the GW's power and 60% of its weight. The trailer wanted to pull me around too much. That type of camping trailer is different, however, from a strictly baggage type trailer that does not have all the camping tent parts attached.

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