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Hi guys,

I'm going to take my first motorcycle course in the spring and was told I need to provide my own gloves for the class. Can you guys recommend any? Am I over-thinking this? I think my wife wants to get me a pair for Christmas, so I thought I'd do some research.

As usual, thanks for any help.
 

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For MSF you can use $8 dollar work gloves from home depot. If you want to buy actual riding gloves then it would depend on the season and how much you want to spend...

Gauntlets offer wrist protection but are hotter for summer use and more annoying to put on.
Some have armor padded knuckles and fingers, which is nice if a rock or something hits your hand.
Some have mesh in between the fingers for summer time cooling when you spread your fingers
Some are insulated for winter use
Some are actually heated.

There are a ton of brands and I don't know that any are particularly good or bad if they look like they are of good quality, are reasonably priced and fit well they should do fine.
 

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I agree with ww, I used my old crappy leather work gloves for MSF and they were just fine. Go to your motorcycle store and try some on and what feels right and have your wife get them. When you graduate to your first motorcycle, then you will already have a nice pair ready for use.
 

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agree.
MSF will not put you in any situations where serious hand damage is likely - you would have to try really hard to mess up ... to mess up. :) So any reasonable leather gloves will work for MSF.

Real gloves need to have good reinforcement, fit your hands well, and still give comfort and dexterity. It is important that the gloves should NOT come off your hands when the straps are fastened - put them on, fasten them, and then tug on the fingertips ... the gloves should NOT come off your hands. In real accidents, gloves and boots are often ripped off riders' bodies by the force of the asphalt tugging on the gear.

Go down to your local MC store and try on many different kinds of gloves. No need to do this now ... but it will be important when you start riding for real.

good luck,
dT
 

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Yes, you are over thinking it.:D
As said before, a good pair of mechanics or similar gloves will work fine for the MSF course.
 

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I like to carry backup gloves in case I get a pair wet, and I'm a real fan of leather roping gloves - tough, grippy and not too expensive from any tack/western wear shop.
 

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When it's time to get gear, spend money and get real motorcycling gauntlets. Humans instinctively put out their hands when they fall. Those cheap mechanics gloves won't survive a serious get off let alone protect your hands. If in doubt, do the "belt sander" test.
These are what I wear:

What you don't see in the picture are large hard abrasion resistant plastic pads on the palms. Given the choice, I'd rather be wearing them while sliding down the road instead of simple leather gloves.
 

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For the MSF, just bring anything, you won't get over 20-25 mph.

Unless you live somewhere that the climate is constant like San Diego, you'll need 2 or 3 pairs of gloves in my opinion. I've got thick gauntlet style for when its cooler out, and then a couple of more middle weight gloves for the warmer weather. All are motorcycling specific though. I rode home about 40 miles on Saturday from the shop where I had the bike serviced and had only brought my lighter gloves unfortunately. My hands were freezing the whole time, as the gauntlets sat here on my desk at home. It was about 50 degrees outside.
 

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When it's time to get gear, spend money and get real motorcycling gauntlets. Humans instinctively put out their hands when they fall. Those cheap mechanics gloves won't survive a serious get off let alone protect your hands. If in doubt, do the "belt sander" test.
These are what I wear:

What you don't see in the picture are large hard abrasion resistant plastic pads on the palms. Given the choice, I'd rather be wearing them while sliding down the road instead of simple leather gloves.
I've got an AStar version of that glove, I would love to find a winter version since they're not doing me any good if it gets below 50. I might try some liners when I get paid next but for now if it's below 50 I'm wearing ski gloves.
 

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I used to wear ski gloves commuting on a 50 cc scooter (put most of the bikes to bed and rode the scoot all year - low, stable and went through slush and over ice without an issue) but found they (the gloves, not the scoot) weren't flexible and "feely" enough for a motorcycle, at least for me. When I've fallen, on the bike or not (heels on a tile floor - you guys wouldn't get that) I tend to land on my shoulder. My husband says that most guys who have done sports, etc., know how to fall and don't stick their hands out. Not saying in a high flying crash your hands wouldn't be in the way, and it's that small percentage you protect yourself from. So I agree with buying proper gloves if you hit the highways. A lot of my day to day riding was stop and go, lucky to get out of 2nd, and I liked the price and protection of good leather work gloves (Carharts - waterproof, reinforced knuckles and palms). For the test, yeah, anything leather. For future riding, I had several pairs for different weather and conditions. No gauntlets though; in the rain, water drips down your jacket and lands in the gloves. Yuck.
 

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"Just tuck" . . . easy for you to say. I have enough trouble getting my regular gloves under my sleeves. But that is totally logical.
 

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"Just tuck" . . . easy for you to say. I have enough trouble getting my regular gloves under my sleeves. But that is totally logical.
Once you get down into the 20s and 30s I find it's a lot better to tuck your sleeves into your gauntlets, not the other way around. Otherwise the wind just shoots up your arms.
 

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Just depends on the gear I guess. All of my coats have adjustable wrist straps, etc. Also I'm a big dude, so my sleeves are large, and probably more tuck-able. :)
 

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that's a nice lookin' glove above. i might look for some of those myself :)

i don't tuck in the gauntlets. they should have some way of tightening down - like an extra fastening strap with velcro. That is important. The point about wearing the gauntlet outside of the sleeves of your coat is that then the cold air (and any rain) does not go up your arms.

dT
 
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