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Discussion Starter #1
So what does one do in the winter when you cant ride? Remodel a garage of course!

Caryn and I purchased a 100 year old house about a year ago. We love antiques and the primitive look so the only house that would really fit our lifestyle was something with a very old flavor. However, the problem with old houses is that they typically have no garage or only a 1 car garage. To get everything we wanted there came a sacrifice and that was the garage. How does a guy go from a 2.5 car extra deep garage to a 1 car garage and not want to hang himself?

Well, a great buddy of mine also does commercial building and heard my plea for help. He offered to help remodel my garage (he's either an idiot or a great friend - I'm going with both). Objective: take it from a naked and spidery place to one that would be worth having. While we intend to build a 2 car garage out back within 5 years, this was my saving grace...A garage done up for nothing but motorcycles! That lawnmower and other typical garage junk can go to the oversized shed! I'm certain that my family is happy that I didn't have to end up hanging myself from the god-awful uneven rafters.

The garage is nowhere near done but here is a before picture and a current picture as of today. We have a lot more to do but here is a pic of how it was before we started and one with our current progress ending today. I plan to post some photos of the project in a timeline another day and I will also post pictures as we continue. If anyone has general questions, please ask. I'd be happy to pass on as much knowledge as possible in order for someone else to be able to make this happen.

BEFORE: This was at its best possible state.

ZOE_0058_1_1 by kodacoyote, on Flickr


CURRENT STATUS: Long way to go but what a difference!

IMAG1653 by kodacoyote, on Flickr


More to follow in the days ahead...
 

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Looks great!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks gentlemen. We are both in the construction industry (he's commercial and I am residential) so you have two guys that can easily get carried away with things! I also had a good budget to purchase items that will be lifetime products. If we move, the cabinetry goes with me. I am a FIRM believer in "once and done" when it comes to purchasing things. Do it right or don't do it at all.

The goal is to eliminate everything from being on the floor so that there is as much possible space to work in. Aside from the bench you see, my rolling toolbox and an air compressor, all floor space is free. We have two sportbikes to store in the garage but bike stands will be used the majority of the time to even eliminate the bikes from leaning out toward the center of the garage on their kickstands. The 1972 CB450 will be stored in the dry oversized shed out back and its being sold in the spring. Each bike has a place against the wall and under cabinets.

I put a lot of time into designing this project. I spend a ton of time in my garage so making it as efficient as possible with space management was at the top of my list. The second objective was to make it look like a million bucks and I think that we are succeeding. The paint scheme I came up with was created to add a pop of color, give a race feel, eliminate dirty walls on the bottom (adding a darker color) while giving as much light as possible (white for reflectivity) in the process. I think that its a success. The red is actually Craftsman red. I had custom paint mixed just by taking the paint store my toolbox handle and having them scan it.

I've tried to account for all issues including replacing the door you see in the picture. It should be in this week. Instead of swinging into the garage, it will swing out onto our patio area. It will also be a much better insulated door than the current one. Energy efficiency has also been a large consideration and everything is insulated to the teeth.

More to come!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
be careful, if it looks too good you won't be allowed to put the bikes in it.
Given that the SV650 you see is Caryn's it won't be a problem...lol. Besides, she knows that the threshold of the garage begins my space. She is pretty excited with what we have done too. She gets greasy working on bikes with me as well.
 

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It looks great
 

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It's the next step I hate - mudding
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The most brutally uneven ceiling ever. Had to cut out rafters and replace just to hang drywall. The ceiling is now ridiculously reinforced.

IMAG1296 by kodacoyote, on Flickr

Mudding of drywall complete. Derick is a bit excited about that fact.

IMAG1475 by kodacoyote, on Flickr

Sanding complete...well, before touchups after the first coat of primer anyway. Did I mention how much I hate sanding drywall?

IMAG1474 by kodacoyote, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A lazy Sunday for Caryn as she supervises the painting process. She did keep us fed with grilled cheese. Two coats of primer white down, 3 coats red and ready for the black stripe.

IMAG1549 by kodacoyote, on Flickr

Black stripe down! Getting excited at this point.

IMAG1570 by kodacoyote, on Flickr

Never underestimate the power of what a new garage door opener can do for appearances! Besides, the old one was ancient and didn't have an exterior key pad. Matches the tool boxes and of course the Craftsman red paint.

IMAG1518 by kodacoyote, on Flickr
 

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It's the next step I hate - mudding
REALLY! That's the one job I love doing. You can hide many a flaw done correctly.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Using a heavy nap roller helps fill new drywall, adds texture, helps eliminate minor imperfections in the mud and puts a thicker coat on for durability.

IMAG1471 by kodacoyote, on Flickr

Using Zip Strips makes a perfect corner every time. If you have trim then this stuff makes everything perfect. Pricy but worth the cost. You can see how sharp the edge is and the edge of the trim isn't even painted black yet.

IMAG1595 by kodacoyote, on Flickr
 

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Had a neighbor who paid his way through college by doing drywall. After 3 weeks working on a doorway he came over twice. 10 minutes for the first coat and then next day 5 minutes for the skim coat.

I had worked for hours, running the beads, sanding them down. Running new beads sanding them down, repeat as neaded and still didn't have an even doorway.

He also showed me the trick of using a damp sponge to finish sanding
 

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Discussion Starter #17
REALLY! That's the one job I love doing. You can hide many a flaw done correctly.:thumbsup:
...or you can make it look worse! Obviously the mud is there to blend it all together. I don't mind mudding so much as sanding. Sanding sucks. Even using low dust mud doesn't help and no mask short of a breather is going to keep you from blowing white boogers for the next three days.
 

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Yeah, you can have the sanding part but a good job doesn't need a lot either.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Left to do:

Install out-swing door and frame. Painting it and trimming it in with 1x
Replacing angle iron holding the garage door rails with shiny new material
Adding wire shelving for bulkier storage
Furring out baseboard area to drywall depth
Installing 6" black base cove
Prepping floor for Polyurea industrial strength floor coating
*Scrubbing down with hot water
*Acid etching the concrete
*Filling in chips with special product
Installing foam insulation to garage door and painting it
Replace garage door seals
Finish painting trim around entry and garage doors
Adding frosted film to garage door windows and entry door window into house
Replace a few light switches from almond to white
Move tools back in and decorate!

I have tons of professionally done photos of me and my bikes that will be displayed in matching black frames all over the walls. Everything will be crisp and clean. I am also planning to add a poster sized logo of the group that I am of a co-founder of on the wall. It is also red and black. I am actually wondering if we could pull off a magazine feature when its done. I am hoping that it turns out that good.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yeah, you can have the sanding part but a good job doesn't need a lot either.
Very true statement...unless you're dealing with a house that is older than dirt and nothing is close to being even. This garage, while structurally very sound, was absolutely horrifically out of square. We had to cut out and replace rafters that were bowed up to an inch from one to the next. You cant see the bowing with the naked eye but you can still tell by using a laser. One corner, just to the left of the door you see in the top photos, is bowed as well. There was zero that could be done short of cutting out all of the siding that was there and possibly reframing that wall in. There is plaster on the other side. Sometimes you have to use extra mud to get things closer to square. No other choice.
 
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