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So a woman I know verbally castrated me the other day. She rides a twatrocket 250 and regularly rides the interstate. I have a Honda 450 (this will be Year Three) and have never touched the interstate (my top speed on country roads: 63mph). She snickered and suggested I "conceive a pair."

Wind scares the **** out of me; I feel like I'm going to lose control of the bike. However, when on those back roads and a truck is bearing down on me (opposite lane), I relax my upper self and grip the gas tank. It passes, the gust whooshes past, and I mentally flip it the bird.

Am I ball-less re highways? I really do enjoy day trips via back roads, but I wouldn't mind mixing it up a bit.

Don't call me emasculating names. Believe me, there's nothing I haven't already been named.
 

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I ride the highways (but also prefer the secondaries) and can tell you that, even after more than a few decades, riding the at speed, in traffic, with a strong cross wind, is not something I enjoy.

Truck, if passing, I do so quickly. Many times the wind off the back will cause a weave, same applies when passing and a lot depends on the load - reefer, tanker, flat bed, they all have their own characteristics.

Meeting trucks head on is another thing, sometimes that blast is unnerving, to say the least.

It is just something you have to learn to deal with, and trust me, you learn quickly. The bike will usually ride itself through most of it -

Except the side winds, it was only a couple weeks ago, I dead headed home on the interstate and the side winds were 35+ MPH, I had to ride leaned over, not just feeling like it, it was extreme. And when the wind would break, or a car/truck would be passed, it required total and complete concentration with some prayer tossed in for good measure.

Back roads are the best, without question, and that women that verbally castrated you only proved how little she knows about riding. Obviously she has issues, beyond motorcycles, or, maybe that's her way of flirting -

You had the opportunity, if she shows you her ride, you'll show her yours -

Practice and confidence, comes with time. Respect it, don't fear it.
 

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A windshield will help a lot at highway speeds to keep the wind blast from putting constant pressure on your chest. This reduces rider fatigue to a large extent.

As far as cross winds and wind effects from large trucks, keeping the body loose, especially the arms, wrists, and elbows will help a lot. When the rider tenses up, the wind pushing the body translates directly to the steering, exaggerating the effect of the wind.

Practice will help the rider relax. Looking for clues to where wind gusts will happen (and suddenly stop) will help keep from being surprised.

Wind will push a motorcycle around a bit, but being aware of and used to the effects will help a rider stay in control.
 

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I always drive in the correct "left track" whenever riding on highways. But whenever a bigger truck/RV is oncoming I make a habit to slip over to the "right track" until the truck passes me. There is always an air vortex swirling behind a big truck that is not just uncomfortable, it can also often carry in it small bit of debris or sand that you want to avoid.

But otherwise, yeah highway driving is 1/2 the reason I bought a bike in the first place! Don't fear it, learn it!
 

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Dods is right, a windshield would help a lot! I started the highways, by finding a local one, that was fairly straight and not a lot of traffic using it, find one you are familiar with! I would jump on the entrance ramp, ride until I felt a little uncomfortable, and take the next exit off, ride under the bridge, jump back on and go the opposite way. I did this a few times until I got used to entering the highway and exiting and riding at highway speeds.
I take the highway first thing in the morning to get where I am going the quickest way, so I can enjoy the rest of the day on the country roads. Now I have been through quite a few big city highways, most of which were not too bad, but sometimes like in Charleston, WV and Atlanta, Ga were a bit taxing when you are stuck in traffic and it is hot out! I don't like the highways in Columbus or Cleveland, Ohio because I get lost every stinkin' time!:mad:
But always know where you are heading and what exit you want to get off at. For a quick way, I would write the name of the highway, the entrance and the exit on a piece of surgical tape and just tape it to the tank, one glance down and it would remind me.
Just be sure to maintain your lane, if you are in the slow lane and ride too far to the right, it allows the cager to think that they have more room to move into your lane of travel. If you ride in the middle or a little more to the left (stay away from the lines) then they have to give you a little more room to pass and move into your lane (in a perfect world, no one would cut you off).
Trucks, move as far away as you can, maintaining your lane, get past them as quickly as possible. I have found, that most of them will move over a little more when they see a bike passing them! That is nice! Keep a good distance from the rear of the trucks too, so you don't get pelted with road debris.
You will do fine, just take your time. I am a female, I don't call anyone names for the way they ride or where....just do what you enjoy!:wink:
 

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I'm probably an oddball, but I enjoy riding the superslabs. I can go along faster and find it relaxing not having to worry so much about cross traffic and potential left-turners.
I guess that makes me an oddball also. Riding the Interstates I don't have to be on the alert so much for cross traffic or cars pulling out of blind driveways and such. I find it more relaxing in a lot of ways. Cross wind never bothered me and big rigs are no big deal, maybe because I drove them for a big portion of my life. I just sort of accepted it and learned it immediately. And I ride a Sportster with no windshield, I love the feel of wind in my face.
 

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Weight is definitely a factor. I have a little crotch rocket 360lb, when I hit a hill top with no trees the wind gets me every time.

A Sportster 550lbs I have never had a problem with non-interstate roads, no windshield and I don't take it on the interstate anymore. I do have a little windshield that helps on the interstate, but still I don't like it. 65 is my limit, well sometimes I go faster for short spurts.

A Stryker 650lb with a little tiny windshield and at 90mph the interstate winds don't bother me.

I am looking to get a larger fairing type windshield for my sportster, but that is mainly for colder weather riding.

My opinion, you are not a wimp for not driving on the interstate. And like mentioned earlier, if she's hot go for it.
 

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It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye
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Two words for the gal giving you ****.

SCREW HER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Ride the bike "YOU" want, where "YOU" want as often and as fast as "YOU" want and tell the rest of the world to go screw themselves.

She doesn't call you a P$%#& because you wear comfortable shoes and walk too slow does she?
It's none of her damn business.

(Rant over!!)
 

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One of the things that helped me best was a conversation with my dad before I even started riding. We talked basic physics: the faster the bike is moving, the more force it takes to get it to turn/curve.

Weight of the bike plays a factor, and the above certainly doesn't mean that wind won't have an effect. Gila Bend is the windiest place I've ever been, and it was unnerving at times.

But I'm with many others on highways: no left turns in front of me, and a lot more comfortable. The wind (be it from highway speeds, cross wind, or trucks) is the lesser of evils. I'd rather be blown around in my lane a bit than have someone turn in front of me.
 

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Feel better ODE? You are 100% correct though. Ride your own ride. Don't let ANYONE get you to do something you are not ready for. But as others have said, the weight of the bike and a windshield make a huge difference. But stick with your bike until you are ready to go larger. You will be glad you did because will learn more about wind and how it works on a bike than those that went with a larger bike to begin with. You will get used to what to expect and how to brace yourself as time goes. Many of the macho types get totally blown away with heavy cross winds and truck wind. You will be light years ahead of them as you learn. Believe or not.:thumbsup:
 

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I'm probably an oddball, but I enjoy riding the superslabs. I can go along faster and find it relaxing not having to worry so much about cross traffic and potential left-turners.
Makes two oddballs then. I have some friends that hate riding the slab but I don't mind it at all..especially if I am in any kind of hurry to get someplace. I like the back roads too....but no problem at all on the Interstate....very relaxing to me.
 

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What OldDeadeye said.

Ride where you are comfortable and enjoy. There are times I want to feel everything my bike has and I want to add miles to the odometer, then there are those days a lazy ride up a secondary road is just what I need.
Secondly, ride within your skill level, dont let a show off intimidate you into riding how and where you dont like to go.
 

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Wind scares the **** out of me; I feel like I'm going to lose control of the bike. However, when on those back roads and a truck is bearing down on me (opposite lane), I relax my upper self and grip the gas tank. It passes, the gust whooshes past, and I mentally flip it the bird.
All I can say is does it matter what others think? With that said ...

You get used to the wind. The first time I had a windblast from a large truck I felt like someone hit me in the chest with a bat and I thought I was going to dump the bike. The first time I was on the freeway with enough wind to push my bike around I had a bit more skill and confidence and while I did not like it it was not so bad. It is tiring to fight a constant gusty wind for an hour but it is manageable.

As for relaxing when you see a truck coming, shouldnt you always be relaxed like that? :) Handlebars are control inputs not body supports.

My friends father wont ride on the freeway or in excess of 65 ever. It is an individual and personal choice. My personal choice is to avoid riding below 65 :p
 

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Trucks, move as far away as you can, maintaining your lane, get past them as quickly as possible. I have found, that most of them will move over a little more when they see a bike passing them! That is nice! Keep a good distance from the rear of the trucks too, so you don't get pelted with road debris.

I missed this first time through. Watch for road gators if you are anywhere near a truck. They can kill you if they fly off, not to mention trucks have massive blind spots and you are tiny.

 

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never touched the interstate (my top speed on country roads: 63mph).
I can deal with the wind well enough. Just loosen up and the bike will stay upright with little guidance from you. However, I have a 250, and I've never taken it on the interstate, either, because...

Ride the bike "YOU" want, where "YOU" want as often and as fast as "YOU" want and tell the rest of the world to go screw themselves.
 

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--

Pretty much good advice given so far, except for TR's, in that having the wind blast you in the face above 50 mph because you don't have a windshield can be very tiring and unsafe. It's too easy for objects (like grasshoppers or birds) to hit you and spread guts and stuff all over--some of it, theirs. (Now if you are already messed up, like TR, then it won't matter--but that's another story.)

Some folks have done the on-the-slab rides for just a few exits at a time until they get used to it and then built up to longer rides. I, too, was pretty nervous the first time. Now I avoid them unless I'm in a hurry since I like sightseeing and dawdling along.

--
 

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So a woman I know verbally castrated me the other day. She rides a twatrocket 250 and regularly rides the interstate. I have a Honda 450 (this will be Year Three) and have never touched the interstate (my top speed on country roads: 63mph). She snickered and suggested I "conceive a pair."

Wind scares the **** out of me; I feel like I'm going to lose control of the bike. However, when on those back roads and a truck is bearing down on me (opposite lane), I relax my upper self and grip the gas tank. It passes, the gust whooshes past, and I mentally flip it the bird.

Am I ball-less re highways? I really do enjoy day trips via back roads, but I wouldn't mind mixing it up a bit.

Don't call me emasculating names. Believe me, there's nothing I haven't already been named.
It's actually more stable the faster you go, unless you were to hit a big pothole or large wild animal.. The wind gets louder the faster you go, so try some ear plugs if you are not wearing a full face helmet. It will help greatly with dampering the wind noise, plus save your hearing at the same time. That wind noise can really damage the hearing. If you look up on google about the wind noise and hearing damage you will find alot of information about it.

Also if you are riding @ 63 mph and go onto the interstate and ride 20 mph faster then that, you are able to handle it. I wouldn't recommend hitting triple numbers at first, just cruise at a speed you feel comfortable with and pay attention to your side views and whats in front of you.
 

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Trixter, it is also important to watch for smaller pieces on the highway, when you see one or two there are going to be more ahead. Cars also throw those gators. I was in my Jeep and 3/4 of a truck tire came off a semi, the car in front of me, it's tire picked it up and threw it back at my Jeep at 65 mph, it hit the front bumper of the Jeep, after I maneuvered out of the way as much as I could, I had just had the bumper replaced a week before that, it scuffed it and fell to the berm! So I was very lucky!
 

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I prefer the Back Roads when riding to enjoy with no particular or a short haul destination in mind although usually run it about 5-10MPH over the limit to keep tailgaters from being a problem .. If doing a long haul road trip with some time limit involved on getting there, prefer the Super Slab at about 80 MPH and get er done ..
 
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