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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I’ve Decided to start riding and I’m looking at a roadster to be my first ride. Looking for suggestions, advice (the wish I would’ve knowns), and basically anyone willing to look out for me.

I’m 5’6” and want something that isn’t entirely out of my skill set, but has MORE than enough room for me to be able to grow with, and will also last me longer than the first time I drop it (cause it’s bound to happen at some point). My main issues are I’m going to be saving up for it over the next year or two, and I don’t truly know the first thing about riding (meaning not the obvious things like situational awareness, and the throttle is the right handle). I’ll answer questions, y’all have any for me, and I’ll ask them as I think of them.

Thanks for your time, and guidance!!

Acdx
 

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Strongly recommend you start with a Motorcycle Safety Foundation Course. In three days you will learn the basics sufficiently to determine whether riding is a natural fit for you, and it will equip you to keep improving after. It will also get you a license and save a few bucks on insurance.

Harley Davidson is trying to create new riders. They have training ranges behind their dealerships and might be able to give you a good deal on a class.
 

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On The Road Again!
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What BWB75 said.....
And....regarding dropping it.....
Get a set of crash bars of some sort on the bike.
You WILL drop it at some point and crash bars will save some expensive damage to the bike. They also will hold it up off of the ground a bit and make it easier to pick up.
 

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Oh, man. My poor old Kawasaki Ninja 500 would have loved some crash bars. I dropped that bike at every stop sign in my subdivision, it seemed like. Great bike. Stuck with me like a champ until some yee-haws stole it in 2002.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Strongly recommend you start with a Motorcycle Safety Foundation Course. In three days you will learn the basics sufficiently to determine whether riding is a natural fit for you, and it will equip you to keep improving after. It will also get you a license and save a few bucks on insurance.

Harley Davidson is trying to create new riders. They have training ranges behind their dealerships and might be able to give you a good deal on a class.
Thank you for letting me know where to go, and the pointer on the benefits.

My biggest concern really isn’t about the inherent risks or gaining the license, that’s why I’m investing a couple of years into saving up and then getting one. It gives me time to gain the knowledge and necessary skills... my main concern is a ride that I can grow into and will be rugged (the drop bars are definitely something I’ll be looking into).

I’ve been recommended the Yamaha bolt, victory octane, triumph generally (I’m leaning towards the speedmaster)... something not too entirely out of my skill level, and has MORE than enough room for me to grow... I’m a stringy little dude coming in at 5’6” and around 120lbs... any thoughts or other ideas? My spending cap is around 6 or 7, and that’s with the understanding that it’ll be used..
 

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You have a comfortable budget to get started, which is great. Consider setting 1k aside for gear. Cheap, shoddy, or used gear will make your ride unpleasant and may not protect you in a crash.

Your height is like mine. I fit a Sportster like a handmade glove, but that was my third bike and the torque and weight made it intimidating for months (I eventually put 35k miles on it and then it got broken in a move). BMW makes the G310R and G310GS, both of which are super light, have decent power, and look like a million bucks. But, you will not be safe on highways with those bikes - too light, and too small. You will want to sell them in a year or less.

It would be great to recommend the Kawasaki Versys 650, but I can't touch the ground from the saddle. With your height being similar to my own, that's a non-starter.

Have you checked out the Triumph Bonneville series? One of those could be your first bike and carry you forever. Don't dismiss it until you sit on one.

Then there is the Ducati Monster 600. Lots of maintenance... but... it's gorgeous!

Some of these suggestions are exotic. If you live in Atlanta or New York or LA or San Diego, no problem. If you are like us, though, and do not live in a mega city, you might find that the Euro bikes are impossible to maintain. I was at the local BMW dealer just the other day and a dude was trying to trade in his Triumph because he had to ride 200 miles to get regular service intervals. It is good to think about that stuff for the long term.
 

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I took the MSF course with no prior riding experience and only passed by 1 point. I heard the class was very easy but it really wasn't for me. I could be an exception and just naturally suck at riding *shrug* I recommend trying to spend some time riding in a parking lot before taking the class.

I've been riding for a few months and I started with a Honda Shadow Phantom. The thing felt like a tank at first but now it feels small and light. I like it.
 

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I suggest looking into the Kawasaki Ninja 400. Motorcycle daily's bike of the year. Cheap, light, beginner friendly, but still fun after you gain experience. A used Honda 500 twin would be good also.
 
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