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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
At one point, as we turned back from our 30 mile jaunt into the wilds of Westchester County, I just screamed for joy into my helmet and sang born-to-be-wild into my helmet. Despite the fear and the fury of dumping the bike last weekend, I was out and living and riding, 70 mile per hour concrete was being gobbled by the greedy 90 degree 750 v4 that I could hear thrumming at 5 thousand torque-y RPM's, the only thing between me and a world of hurt was good traction and 1.2mm of leather.

Perfect.

After severely bruising my right hip dumping my bike because of bad swerving skills, a good friend of mine grabbed his '92 Nighthawk 750 and met me at my place. Straddling 1.5 liters of Honda power, we rode up to Fort Tryon Park, and rode at 30 or 35mph around the curves there. He gave me some pointers on how to turn the bike - like salsa, it's all in the hips.

The input REALLY helped. I can recall going around Columbus Circle at 59th street, and because I was leaning with the bike in the 20mph hour turn it felt like I had no control and was about to go down. Counter-steering and now, counter-balancing, I could feel the control of letting the bike turn, and keeping my center of gravity in opposition.

All in all though, my two wipe-outs had spooked me. Leaning the bike was giving me the jitters, but you either do it or fly into a wall. So I did it.

After the park he took me up to the Bronx via Broadway. We skipped a toll plaza by taking back roads ...and ....then.... we hit....the HIGHWAY.

The bike to this point had not even touched it's potential. I once had an excuse to shift it into 4th to keep it down around 2000rpm, which it doesn't really like anyways. Now I felt 1st crank to second, to third, the BIKE ATE SPEED, and unlike a car once I knew the way was clear, the time to high way speed felt like nothing. zero to sixty in two twitches of the foot, then 4th and 5th just to tame the beast.

The Interceptor is not a new bike, so it doesn't have that soothing 6th gear. As we cruised easily with traffic up the Saw Mill and over to the Cross County Parkway to the Sprain Brook parkway, it roared at 5k. The throttle was insanely responsive. At highways speed I had never, ever experienced the responsiveness of a motorcycle. I felt like I was on strings, I could just pull myself up to my friend leading the way.

After a half hour of maneuvering our way calmly through traffic I heard something over the din of the 750. A pack of 600's and Liter-bikes came blasting through. My noob nerves wanted to do all kinds of panicky things, while the adrenaline junky inside wanted to crank the throttle and catch up.

There were a couple hairy moments. I am really spooked about turning and braking, which to some extent is good. But as we took one exit I had to brake A LOT harder than usual. I had mis-predicted the speed. The bike took it, probably could have taken more, but it was hard braking that knocked me over twice already.

As I was pulled hard by the brakes the the turn approached. A huge part of me hated the idea of letting off those brakes. I wanted to keep braking. But I took the leap, let off the rear and front brake and pushed the bike into the turn, straightened it up and braked again for the stop sign. I also used down shifting to make sure I was in the right gear. And no problem. My friend had parked on the street where we stopped at our end point and basked in the glow.

We talked about the bikes for bit, he took mine for a ride and noticed the snappy clutch on the Honda. Hearing me shift would make a mechanic wince. I often miss letting off the throttle or just drop the clutch hard...working on that.

The way back was beautiful and relaxed, until it came time to get back into Manhattan. Crazy spiral entries and exits drove me into putting that bike down into more turns I was uncomfortable with. At one point I leaned into one and feared that if I had to stop by the vanishing point I would probably lay it down. But I watched my friend go first and followed through.

Having someone ahead of me, following his lead, his experience and also having him to do things that pulled me out of my comfort zone, that he knew were safe, helped so much. Riding alone like had last weekend was nothing like this.

We cruised back on the West Side Highway and took my exit on 125th. He said goodbye and took the reentry ramp and I drove my way up to my block. The glazed look in my eyes and grin on my face made me look like a lobotomy patient

Looking at my first week and a half of riding, I wish I had the bread to take the MSF course (350$ in nyc) and I can see how I might be happier with a smaller bike. My hip hurts like hell and so does my wallet from the crashes. In retrospect, I would do a lot of things differently. But I also take the cover off my bike, and every time think to myself, 'it's the most beautiful bike in the world.' In a few months with my basics practiced on Riverside late at night and Parking lots in queens, I think I will only love her more. Ours is a love meant to last.

I can't believe they let people do this. It is Amazing.

If you got this far, thanks for reading!
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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Glad you finally had a good riding experience! BTW, you don't need a 6th gear... your 5th gear is the same as a 6th gear in other bikes. You don't need those other gears because the torquey V4 can utilize wider gearing ratios than peaky inline-4 engines which need narrower gear ratios.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Glad you finally had a good riding experience! BTW, you don't need a 6th gear... your 5th gear is the same as a 6th gear in other bikes. You don't need those other gears because the torquey V4 can utilize wider gearing ratios than peaky inline-4 engines which need narrower gear ratios.
I can't find gear rations anywhere for modern bikes. Here are the one's for my Honda:

1st 2.733
2nd 1.895
3rd 1.500
4th 1.240
5th 1.074

I'm glad to hear it, though I know the newer sports bikes hit 160 fairly easy. My bike will be going ape-**** crazy at 150. Not a big deal, since I have zero-plans for trying to catch up to those guys, though secretly I do hope the 750 can give their zingy new 4's a surprise or two. (doubtful since their bikes have more a third more horse power and are 2/3rds the weight).
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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I see some real potential in your writing style. Do you enjoy writing?

Now, on topic. I am with Primalmu that its good to see things turning around for you for the better. Have you had the bike looked at since those times you went down? From the sounds of it, you dont seem to be having any issues mechanically, but I feel its always good to make sure that its 100% mechanically.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Animedevildog,

Yeah, majored in Creative writing for undergrad, now I'm studying pre-med.

I had the mechanic and two friends of mine feel out the brakes and fork. They said it was fine. Right now the only problem is that the last fall bent nozzle for the upper radiator cap and broke off half the cap. We tied a plastic bag around it. It appears to be leaking a couple teaspoons of coolant every ride. I have a new radiator and cap coming in the mail. Also I need to put some more air in the rear tire, my right blinker and my horn aren't working....go figure, they were before. I'm going to get into its electrical tomorrow.

I'm very happy. 3 days of riding in a row without crashing. I'm going for 4 tonight if the streets are dry.

:)
 
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