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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys! My name is Andrew, I'm 19 years old and am looking too get a street bike. I was wondering what you guys recommend for a starter street bike?

I have quite a bit of Trail/Track riding on dirt. I have been riding for just about 8 years strictly on dirt.

Would it be wrong to try to start with something a little more aggressive for my first bike? Or should I still start slow to gain some road experience?
 

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The fact that you are experienced will really help as you adjust to street riding, as you will not be trying to remember which hand is the clutch as you approach an intersection or accidentally locking the rear wheel as you approach the driveway.

Many on this forum would agree that, past the basics, road strategy is more important than riding proficiency for staying alive on the street. The consequences of other people's failures are suddenly really important. Now you can't assume that the car next to you won't swerve into your lane, so you need to make sure that there isn't a car next to you. Stuff like that. Car drivers rarely think about this stuff, and since you aren't a car, they are not programed to treat you like one. An experienced rider course would be great, if there is one in your area, because they assume you can ride and talk about street strategy.

This has less to do with the bike and more to do with your brain. I would recommend a bike that is comfortable and not distracting for you, with familiar feeling controls and layout, so you can focus on your road strategy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The fact that you are experienced will really help as you adjust to street riding, as you will not be trying to remember which hand is the clutch as you approach an intersection or accidentally locking the rear wheel as you approach the driveway.

Many on this forum would agree that, past the basics, road strategy is more important than riding proficiency for staying alive on the street. The consequences of other people's failures are suddenly really important. Now you can't assume that the car next to you won't swerve into your lane, so you need to make sure that there isn't a car next to you. Stuff like that. Car drivers rarely think about this stuff, and since you aren't a car, they are not programed to treat you like one. An experienced rider course would be great, if there is one in your area, because they assume you can ride and talk about street strategy.

This has less to do with the bike and more to do with your brain. I would recommend a bike that is comfortable and not distracting for you, with familiar feeling controls and layout, so you can focus on your road strategy.

Great information! Thanks
 
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