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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks everyone. Urban I'm in socal now. Any recommendations for websites to find a used bike, I don't trust craigslist based on past experiences.
 

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Wondered why I saw that :p. Well craigslist is going to be iffy in socal but there again prices will be extremely competitive. Heck, you can get that 250 I mentioned at bottom of the barrel prices (this could probably be haggled down to 1k: http://sandiego.craigslist.org/csd/mcy/4733251105.html).

If you live in socal, get familiar with your insurance agent and your bikes of interest. The difference at my age between a 500cc Ninja and a 600cc Inline 4 is 2x the cost.. probably worse in the golden state.

Another:
http://sandiego.craigslist.org/csd/mcy/4709857619.html

Insurance example:
[–]BerkeleyBound420NorCal '01 CBR 600 F4i 2 points 1 year ago
19 years old. Ninja 250R 2011. Progressive. In California. Comp/ high uninsured/underinsured/ high medical coverage - 600$/Yr.... Yay

vs 1000RR at competitive rate.

[–]bilbobagginsssBMW S1000RR BlueFire 2 points 5 months ago
28 yrs old, BRC, ARC, Lee Parks 1, 2, and 3 completed, STAR school 1 and 2 completed, full coverage and 1 minor incident on record, in Southern California, and I pay ~$300 USD every 6 months for insuring my S1000RR. Gotta love USAA (official USAA, not the farmed out Progressive crap).
 

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The deathgrip is a nasty thing. I think all beginners start off with the deathgrip. It's not till you start really getting comfortable with your bike that the deathgrip loosens. Once you loosen the grip up, it makes riding more enjoyable, and alot more controlable. I still find myself with the deathgrip driving at night. What that tells me is I'm not comfortable driving at night. I have a higher chance of crashing at night because I'm not comfortable. Will it be something I can master? Yes, maybe with enough practice and another visit to the eye doctor.....

Listen to the signals your body and bike are giving you.......
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks for the CL links urban, I'm with state farm and I Have yet to talk with my agent.

Zippy great info, I will be doing plenty of night driving when I am ready, my schedule is 2pm-10pm, but it's not unusual that I leave at work at 1am..

Ideally my bike will be my commuter, but days when I'm tired it'll stay in the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
BRC passed and now I'm waiting for my paperwork so I can take the written test at the dmv. I still need to find a bike, I'm finding 250s as low as 2600 and that's 09 models. What are some of the things I should focus on when I practice. I guess it'll be up to me when I csn venture out of a parking lot and hit the streets.

Thanks all
 

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I'm not sure where you live Travis, but in my area there are plenty of older 250's in the $1500-$2000 range. It's cool if you want a newer, nicer bike, but just know that the newer bike is still depreciating and will be harder to get your money back out of.

As far as practicing, the biggest thing is probably starting and stopping, shifting, the basic stuff. Keep your head up, look ahead, don't look down. That has always been my biggest problem, l am working on it still and getting better every day. We have a tendency to look down to make sure we don't hit anything with our front tire. We then lose sight of what is ahead in the big picture.

One thing that l learned from Zippy is to learn how to stop on a dime. Start by getting up to 20mph and do a nice strong brake, with both front and rear. Practice this until you fell like bam, you can stop in an emergency at 20...then 25, then 30. Do not push yourself to far too fast. You want nice small successes. If ou can start and stop well, and shift through the gears effectively, up and down, then you are well on your way :)
 

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Things to practice often:
Using the proper technique when cornering/turning. (Slow, look, press, roll)

Quick braking

Swerving

Looking ahead and positioning yourself in the safest possible position at all times
 

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You want to stay on top of your basic skills. Swerving, practice that till you feel like you are dancing with your motorcycle. That right there will save your life on many occasions and help avoid those nasty potholes that you do not want to hit with your bike. A pothole can possibly knock you off your bike. Plus it saves wear and tear on suspension and forks.

Emergency stops - I think many here will agree with me. It's the one thing everyone of us must practice. And you must use both brakes. Your rear brake only provides 30 percent of your stopping power, but thirty percent could mean walking away from an accident or being pulled away on a stretcher. Someone once told me, once you learn how to stop on a dime, you will feel more confident with your abilities and your speed will pick up. That person was correct. Once you know you can stop that bike quick, it really does help things progress.

Keeping your eyes open and looking far ahead is another one of those things that can save your life. People tend to have tunnel vision, and it's not a good thing. In a corner, you do not want to look down. Your bike goes where your eyes go. Keep searching for that exit, once you see the exit, then your hand can turn that throttle. Keep your eyes on what people are doing. Last week, had I not noticed the car in front of me swerve, I probably would have hit a live wire that was hanging down. I didn't see the wire, but I saw the car swerve, so it made me realize, hey Zippy, somethings up, what is it? I cannot stress enough the importance of paying attention on a bike. Cage drivers don't, so we must......

When you think you got it, great, but keep going to that parking lot every once in a while and practice some more. We are human, we get rusty. I'll be back at that parking lot come spring when my bike gets out of winter jail.
 

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And one more thing. Ride your own ride. Don't ever ride to make others happy. You should be riding on the slower side when you first start out. That's perfectly fine. Speed will progress, but you need to learn the other basics first. Stay away from riding with those that may egg you on to ride faster than you are comfortable with. If someone wants to offer you good sound advice, that's great. But don't let them talk you into doing something you don't want to do. Peer pressure gets alot of bikers into trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Thanks eveybody, some great Ino to help me out. I found a 2010 ninja 250r for 1800 close to my hous3, I'm going to check it out tmrw... I also stopped at a honda dealership and sat on a couple bikes, I really liked the cbr 650f, def a bike I'm considering down the road. ... now it's time to focus on what too look for wjen.buying a used bike. Gna have to check out that thread.
 

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Shoot #2 has never been ridden in the rain, so the bike must be perfect! Also owner must be a squid!

That 2012 is dealer price no matter how they want to act like it is worth a bunch.

Stick to a ninja pre 2007. These have cheaper plastics :)
I was more trying to show him good examples of used bikes that are more than likely clean deals from good sellers. You never can tell for sure, but neither of these ads threw any red flags my way.
 

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Personally, l think if you are interested in sport bikes, at your size a used Ninja 250 would be perfect. You can pick up a clean one in great working order for under $2000 and they are reliable, easy to ride, and forgiving to the new rider. I would say the 250 Ninja and the 250 Rebel are the most common beginner bikes out there.

Don't bother with a CBR300 yet. They are too pricy and whatever you start with you are going to drop a couple of times, even if it is just in your driveway. Save the pretty bike for your next purchase. This is your first bike, not your last bike.
Couldn't have said it better myself. Great advice
 
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