Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To start I've just turned 18 and I'm about 5 foot 10 inches. I'm looking at a 1981 Yamaha 850 Special. I really like this bike the seller says it's in great condition and is only asking 895$ for it. I have a lot of interest in it how ever I have no riding experience at all. I've been talking about buying it with my mother and she's voiced concerns about how large it is and me not being able to control it stating that if it were to fall on me I'd never walk again. I believe this to be just my mom worrying as I feel that I would be quite capable of controlling it and keeping it from falling on me but I want to know for sure. So in short would I be capable of riding this bike?
 

· On The Road Again!
Joined
·
4,156 Posts
People have started out on large bikes before and done ok.
But it's a lot easier and safer to start on something smaller and lighter.
I wouldn't worry about it falling on you.
But having all that power get away from you?? That could be a real concern.

Where are you located, Joseph?
 

· Gone
Joined
·
20,523 Posts
I would recommend a single or twin cylinder to learn to ride safely on.

Without a working crystal ball and a clear view of the future, it's really hard to say how well it would work out. The odds are better choosing a more user-friendly motorcycle to start with and learning to ride proficiently in traffic before jumping on a larger motorcycle.
 

· Loves All Motorcycles
Joined
·
997 Posts
Like the others said, it would be much much easier to start off on a smaller bike. I've been riding for less than a month, myself. Of my stable of three (two working) bikes, my largest is a 500 single Buell Blast. I feel okay with the 500. I know my confidence often outpaces my skill/the law, so having a bike that can't get me into too much trouble seems like a good thing as I learn.

So at least to me, whether that bike will be a good starter largely depends on how responsible you'll be with it and how proficient you may be with it. I wouldn't worry about your mum, that's a normal concerned parent response. My mum told me that I would die if got a motorcycle at all.

All that said, omg I'd totally get that Yamaha 850 in a Midnight Special edition.
 

· SUPER MODERATOR
Joined
·
7,681 Posts
Listen to what Dodsfall said and don't learn to ride on something that big and heavy. The bike has nice and usable power and is a very nice choice for you after you have some experience under your belt.:wink2:

Try to stay around the 250cc starting point as they are usually light and easy to use--and cheap, especially used.:smile_big:

You won't be able to insure it at your age without a Safety course certificate and an 850cc bike with no experience riding, will be very expensive. Check with your insurance company FIRST.:surprise:

Welcome to the forum and be safe:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
 

· Biker
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Hello Joseph, Ray here, Western Mass huh, I'm from the east end of the state. I rode back in the 70's, a Honda scrambler 360 and 35 or more yrs later got my ass on a Harley 1200 Sporty with no trouble. I would say find a MSF course for basic rider course and you will most likely do pretty good, they use or did use a Honda rebel 250 down here in Clearwater Fl. and in R.I. where my brother took his course. That and low speed maneuvers from 'ride like a pro' which is on the internet. You can put Hi-way bars on the bike so u can stretch out on long rides and if the bike goes down, your leg won't be trapped under it. Yeah MSF is for Motorcycle-Safety-Foundation. I'd say you'll do pretty good.

The MSF course consists of classroom and a range, It is a pretty good course, Study up on the book and u will be fine, written was 50?'s, once U pass the practical, out on the range, they give you a card and a few days later you present it to the DMV and you get your license or endorsement on drivers license that probably says, 'Motorcycle also.' good luck !
 

· Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well good news to those who believe a smaller bike would be better for me, the Yamaha seems to have been sold with in the last couple of hours so that won't be my first bike. Don't know who bought it but I have suspicions towards Offcenter ;) haha
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,365 Posts
There are some really neat bikes of that vintage. But something to consider with that old of a bike is that some of them had problems back then. Manufacturing and engineering has worked a lot of kinks out in the last 35 years. While the bike may be in good running order, I think most people would agree that the chances of you running into problems with a 40 year old Honda are much higher than with a 4 year old Honda. The last thing you want when you are a brand new rider is to be distracted by turn signals that don't work or a clutch that slips. If you have zero riding experience, I would do the following:

1) Go take a motorcycle safety course. They usually use small standards such as a Honda Rebel or a Suzuki TU250. You will get a day or two of riding time out of the class. Granted, it will be on a closed course at less than 20mph, but you will learn the basics of how to operate a bike.

2) Go buy the same bike or similar to the one you use in the class. Stick with something in the 400 pound range or under, and one that is low enough for you to put both feet flat on the ground. Make sure it is in good working order. Those little bikes are great starters and you can often find them for a couple grand or less. After you get a year or two under your belt, now you can start thinking about getting a bike that is more suited to your liking. Chances are you will drop your first bike a time or two anyway. I did. We all did. It happens. WAY better to drop a starter bike than a brand new machine.

3) Go buy really good gear. A good helmet, gloves, bright colored jacket, pants, and riding-specific boots. Do not skimp in this area. You are probably looking at $500 or so to gear up. If you thought motorcycling was cheap, think again. There is a saying..."Dress for the crash, not for the ride." Also, an achronym is ATGATT...All The Gear All The Time. That one time you decide to run up to the store in shorts and a t shirt is the time you will end up with your skin scraped up and down Maple St. You will hear about guys who choose to ride without full gear. They have that choice, and they know the possible consequences. They have been riding for a long time. You have not. Consider it the difference between the way a 6 year old should gear up to ride a skateboard as opposed to Tony Hawk.

4) Go ride, by yourself. Start at slower speeds during non-congested times. In your neighborhood, through back streets, or anywhere that is off the beaten path. Don't try to take on the world during rush hour traffic on busy highways with a whole lot to keep track of right away.



I don't want to scare you, but know this...I am just now considering getting back into riding after almost 3 years away. The last time I rode I ended up staring down a cliff with a broken shoulder BECAUSE I WAS TRYING TO RIDE SOMEONE ELSE'S RIDE AND FOUND MYSELF IN ABOVE MY HEAD. At the time my pride wouldn't allow me to admit it, but that is the truth. Things happen really fast on motorcycles. Your mother's concerns are valid. She doesn't want to bury her son. Take every precaution that is given to you. The world is full of guys who were too cool to heed good advice. I was one of them, and lucky to live to tell about it
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top