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Registered
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good afternoon all…joining from NoVA.

First, I am 46 and committed to becoming a confident licensed new rider. I am registered for the MSF class in mid-June. I cannot express my enthusiasm.

I have joined the forum, because I feel that I have to approach this sport with respect, confidence and caution. I believe the forum; will assist with that guidance and support.

I need a-ton of guidance…
 

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So long
Joined
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2,739 Posts
Welcome to the forum from North Carolina.

The MSF class is a great first step to becoming a rider.
 

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American Legion Rider
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23,631 Posts
 

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Female Rider
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9,311 Posts
Welcome to the Forum. The BRC is a great place to start learning how to ride. Good Luck to you.
 

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Driftless Rider
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1,540 Posts
Welcome from Wisconsin.

The excitement never really goes away. I've been riding 20 years and still feel the buzz every time I throw a leg over...even if it's just to go get a loaf of bread down the street.
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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2,730 Posts
Enjoy being a beginner!

Remember to ENJOY being a beginning rider!

Don't rush the process, or hate that you can't ride like the guys who have ridden for decades, or all their lives.

Definitely DON'T try and keep up with them in the twisties!

If I could give a novice rider only ONE piece of advice it would be "Ride your OWN ride at all times!" Never push yourself beyond your CURRENT skill level trying to "keep up." Don't worry, you'll get there in a year or so....

LISTEN to the older riders around you, deliberately seek them out and ask them "What they see" watching you ride. "What advice can you give me?"

They'll not only teach you technique, but safety, AND help you maintain your bike.

SOME riders will teach you what NOT to do by their example, performing "Hero Passes," "Threading the Needle," passing on double yellows, on the right, in bike lanes, running virtually EVERY yellow, and filtering (aka lane splitting) at significantly faster speeds than the (stalled) cages are moving.

There's NOTHING like a mentor on a motorcycle. They'll save you a lot of grief and perhaps injury. Find one!

Go for long rides, day trips, weekenders, road trips etc. Every single time you'll come home a better rider. Hours in the saddle count.

The key thing you need is a "Stayin' Alive" attitude versus "Hey, Watch this!"

 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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14,359 Posts
Welcome aboard
 
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