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Discussion Starter #1
I nailed down the purchase of a Southport 36x96 lift table. They are said to be built like a beast and cost about 2800.00 new. Lift rated for 2000 Lbs.

319.00 + Tax. Probably could have filled out the PO like I lived in another state, But Ohio govt is so deserving that I just have to make sure that Uncle John Kasich gets his share:(:p

Probably about $500 with gas for the trip. This table will be handy for loading many things on the truck or as a work/welding table and of course a bike lift.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've never seen a Southport, but just looking them up they sound well-made and industrial. Nice! Air/hydraulic?
I had to put this table on hold for a bit. The electric/hydraulic pump was missing,and we are negotiating a price adjustment. Probably will purchase a portable pump designed for an automobile lift from Harbor Freight.

The frame itself consists of 3/4 steel plate for the X frame and is massive. The rollers on the top and bottom were pretty tough shape from the PO not knowing what an oil can was for. I imagine that the table has been through 100,000 cycles. Repairs for the wheels will be the addition of two pieces of 3/4" cold roll steel and new steel wheels. I will use off the shelf stock from the farm supply store with a 3/4 copper pipe as a wear bushing and it should last forever the way I will use it.
The table top is very solid 10 gauge if not 1/8" steel. It should look great when painted
Because of not oiling the thing,the pivot at the center has become oval shaped to a degree. We might be able to fit a1.5" ID hub from the farm store over the frame and weld it on. The center pin at the X-frame is a piece of 1.5" solid cold roll steel. It was fit to the machine and washers welded over the ends after assembly. I will try to come up with a solution that the assembly can be removed without grinding off the washers.

So when the deal gets settled and I finish tearing it down,I will take pictures of the hoist build.

http://www.southworthproducts.com/content118.html

This is the frame series that I have,but of course with the 8 foot top
 

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That thing looks massive. It looks better made then the standard Handy Lift, and probably be a LOT sturdier then my Weaver. I hope you can get something worked out to get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
That thing looks massive. It looks better made then the standard Handy Lift, and probably be a LOT sturdier then my Weaver. I hope you can get something worked out to get it.
We finally got it settled. They offered 200.00 off and I can get a Harbor Freight hydraulic pump made for car lifts for about 275.00. Still probably there for about 500.00,all told. My unit will be like new compared to a new one that costs about 3 grand

http://imageshack.us/a/img84/8960/615eulr.jpg Anyway,this is a picture of a Southport lift and he lifts a Porsche with it. . He must have a ton of confidence in the think to do that without mechanical locking capabilities. The lift in question appears to have the same frame thickness as mine,but has a wider spacing between the legs http://img716.imageshack.us/img716/6109/img0427id.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, now I know that it is going to work. I got some repair parts manufactured,the frame very nicely painted,spent some time drilling and tapping through 1.5' of solid steel.
Finally the Harbor Freight electric/hydraulic pump arrived and it raises the table in 30 seconds to 36'' high. I do wish that Harbor Freight would pack their stuff better. Someone dropped the thing so hard that a corner broke out of the heavy plastic storage tank. The motor mounting base is bent as well. A 55 pound pump packed in single ply cardboard:frown:

This is a special order tool and is ship to home only. I will have to order another and take the bunged and broken one back to Harbor Freight.

Time to take some pictures of the repair and possibly post it up here. Just tickled to death with the results for the money spent.

Slum
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #11
the guys at Southworth told me that the only way to fix this thing was to fill in the entire hole with a seamless welded patch and get it precision drilled to match the precise location of the original hole. Instead,I got an off the shelf bushing that fit the center pivot axle and had my brother get a square of metal broached to fit it. The bushing had a threaded hole,so I took advantage of that and added a grease fitting.
http://i647.photobucket.com/albums/uu194/farmboy6211/331.jpg

So there it is--precisely located on the axle and in the process of being tapped --1.5 inches is a real bear to drill and tap
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The hardest part is done. I would like to paint the top before adding it to the base. The lift pump from Harbor freight had a gallon of fluid as a reserve and that is just enough to bring the cylinder to the top of the stroke. I also added grease fittings to the remaining wear points but for a motorcycle lift,that is probably overkill.
Every piece you repair on this thing needs lifted by an engine hoist or whatnot,so it is a bear to assemble,but I will get there.

thanks for your interest
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Finished!

Life got in the way a bit on this project, but I finally got the top painted and complete. Putting that heavy top on there was quite a chore as it had to be lined up very precisely. I dropped the active end on first and found that the wheels [really just shaft collars] were too big to fit between the channels. instead of a total re-work, I looked at the problem again and worked things out by moving the lift wheels a bit more inboard.

Then the pivot end had to go on, and one click of the ratchet hoist was either too high or too low. Finally it all went together and it raises and lowers beautifully. About 15 seconds raises it thirty inches. On painting the top---I was worried about it being too slick, si I painted a thick coat of black rustoleum on and then sprinkled sand, brushed it in
I need to get a few pictures with bikes on top as the project turned out well.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
repairing process



First, I had to repair the retention rail where it had been ground away because the machine lost a wheel.



New wheels consist of shaft collars attached to a bushing and smeared with grease. All my new parts are used to connect three point hitches to tractors and are pretty cheap to buy



Here is the painted and sand grit top that needs just a thin coat of paint to even out the color. Note the low profile wheel that will mount to the base to move the lift if needed.



Completed wheel assembly for one end. works OK to position the lift and easy to remove if need be as it is just bolts welded to a pipe and wheels added.
First lift of 730 pounds or so. Lifted it like a piece of paper. the lifting unit is from Harbor Freight and designed for their car lift.



Active upper wheels. There is another set on the bottom frame scissor



And finally, the lift with a CB750 on top and raised to 42" Easy to clean underside of exhaust at this height. It is stable at this height as I can jump on either end with the bike loaded, and that surprises me as I figured that the lift should be bolted down when in use. I also can load the bike on the lumber carts even when the carts are on the wood shop floor



This picture shows the first lumber cart loaded with a little bike and the cb750 ready to lift. The 42" maximum lift height is a bit higher than the cart pictured above. Easy and safe to load project bikes on any cart, or a pickup truck for that matter. The Harbor Freight electric/hydraulic unit is visible to the rear of the gas cylinder.

Thanks for your interest.
 
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