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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a 1981 XS 1100H sittin' in the garage. It started burning oil and smoking out the tail pipes after riding it for a few months last summer. I found a serious amount of oil in the air cleaner box (a puddle of oil in the bottom of it). Compression test told me I'm going to need new rings on all four cylinders.
Anyways, my plan was to take the engine over to a machine shop to have them go over the engine, hone and measure the cylinders, valve package, hopefully to get it tuned up and solve this blowback problem.
So I'm following the Clymer manual stringently. I'm working through "engine removal" section, which took me over to "cylinder removal" temporarily. I've come to step 15 of this process, let me catch you up . . .

13. Remove the cam chain guide
14. Remove the 2 exposed cam sprocket bolts
15 Rotate the engine 180 degrees clockwise and remove the 2 remaining sprocket bolts. Do not rotate either cam.
CAUTION
Severe damage can be caused to the cams, valves, cylinder head and pistons if the cams are rotated after the sprocket bolts have been removed

I've removed the first 2 sprocket bolts and am thinking about the next step, of removing the last 2. My question is, how do I rotate the engine without rotating either cam?
Am I supposed to keep rotating the crankshaft? Because that seems to rotate the cams at the same time.

Maybe there's a better question for me to ask: Is there an easier, less involved process to remove the engine? The Clymer advises that "prior to engine removal and disassembly the majority of parts be removed from the engine while it is in the frame. By doing so it will reduce the weight of the engine considerable and make the engine removal easier and safer."
Considering my lack of mechanical skills and knowledge, I'd think the safest approach would be to remove it in as few of steps and pieces as possible, then send it to the people who know what they're doing.

Any ideas as to what the best approach is?
Thanks
 

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I am sorry, but I have no idea how to help. I always get two manuals when I do a big project like that. The first time I tore a complete motor down it was a old VW. I must have gotten 4 different manuals on how to do it. If one did not make sence, another surely would.
 

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Severed Head
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Hmm. Is the cam chain still on? If so:

Rotate engine normally. Cams should rotate normally with engine. Then remove the two remaing bolts while making sure cams do not rotate INDEPENDENTLY of engine crank or each other.

You're trying to avoid the piston crowns making contact with the valves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Continued on

on advise from another forum, I went ahead and continued to rotate the crankshaft, clockwise.
Problem.
Something seemed to "slip" off as I did this. The back cam sprocket tuned enough to expose it's second bolt, however the front cam sprocket did not turn at all. As the back one turned, the back cam did not rotate with the sprocket as it turned, it would spin a little ways and then release and sort of pop back into the resting position it was in. Now, as I spin the crankshaft, neither sprockets will turn at all, and something feels as though it is "slipping" as I turn the crankshaft.
What the cuss?
I must have broke something, any ideas?
 

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Severed Head
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Wow, that went all pear-shaped in a hurry...

Ok, it sounds like with the cam guides out there's enough slack in the cam chain that it's not making complete contact anymore and skipping. Anythin referring to correct cam alignment is out the window. Stop rotating things for now until we know what the current alignment of everything is.

Do a visual inspection of your cams and valves. Are any valves open at all? If, and ONLY IF, all valves are closed and remain closed you can safely rotate the crank without damage, but the cams MUST remain static.

What is the position of the crank in relation to top dead center? You should be able to tell by inspecting the alignment marks for the crank. If, and ONLY IF, the crank is 90* to either side of TDC you can safely rotate the cams as needed, but the crank MUST REMAIN STATIC.

The LAST thing i would advise you to do at this point is to put the chain guides back in and attempt to return the alignment marks to their original state. You are safer at this point locking the crank in a 90* out "safe" position and moving the cams ONLY as much as is needed to get those sprocket bolts off. Get that done and you should be able to proceed normally, providing the cams and crank remain static until removed or your instructions say otherwise.

Hopefully that gives you enough info to dig yourself out of this hole and get the heads off. If you need more, just ask.
 
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