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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

2014 Kawasaki Ninja 300 ABS, when accelerating everything is smooth and sounds sexy. No issues when flooring it.
When holding a steady speed the engine sounds like brrrnrnrnrnrnnrnrnrrnrnrnr, like the throttle quickly kicking on and off, rather than a nice constant brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. It sounds like what I'd imagine the fuel system mapped to run really rich (previous owners used it as a track bike) or maybe a spark plug issue but I have absolutely ZERO problems accelerating super slowly or really aggressively, issue arises ONLY when maintaining a constant speed. At some speeds the choppiness is strong enough to create a very noticeable vibration.

Stock exhaust installed but I think previous owners used aftermarket exhaust, maybe they fuel mapped it to match their exhaust? I am completely illiterate when it comes to fuel mapping/basically anything other than basic oil change type maintenance so I am unaware of the impact that may have.
Bike has been dropped at least twice, pretty bad rash on the exhaust and a scrape on the engine cover on the other side. Complication due to previous crashes? I don't know.
Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you and happy holidays!
 

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It is plausible to be mapped for other hard parts. That is why it is hard to fix things that others have done because you can never know what they know, or actually did. Get it close to what they set it up to orset if for stock dont try to do hybrid repairs rarely does it end well. Or sell it as it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, I'm looking up how to do a TBS on the bike now, sucks that I have to take the gas tank off, been dreading the thought of damaging the tank/hoses.
I'm also going to research how to remap the bike back to stock, if its a simple task then I'll try if that helps.
 

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This happens frequently and can fool people into thinking it is engine related: A BAD drive chain with frozen links. Lift the rear wheel and spin it and look for 'kinks.'

Try a half can of Chevron, 'Techron' in a full tank and ride the snot out of the Lil bike for maybe 50 miles or so or until the 'miss' clears up!

Try my ideas before going to other, more difficult things.

Sam:)
 

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This happens frequently and can fool people into thinking it is engine related: A BAD drive chain with frozen links. Lift the rear wheel and spin it and look for 'kinks.'

Try a half can of Chevron, 'Techron' in a full tank and ride the snot out of the Lil bike for maybe 50 miles or so or until the 'miss' clears up!

Try my ideas before going to other, more difficult things.

Sam:)
+1 for sure very good stuff.

PS, Not to get off subject but a Ford guy on YouTube recommended Chevron Techron Plus and it fixed me right up on my fuel gauge issue on my Ford Exploder. I now use it in my stuff that is running good once a year or so, that is my pick-up and my BMW and my bike(s).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Thank you guys, I've been suggested to replace the chain on another forum as well, bike is at 9k miles and I don't think its been replaced before.
I've never replaced a chain before but this is what I've got so far if anyone would like to advise me:

I'm going to purchase this D.I.D. 520VX3 120-Link Gold Chain which is $81 at current posting on Amazon. It comes with a clip master link so I'm going to buy this D.I.D. 520VX3 Gold Rivet Master Link which is $11 at current posting on CycleGear website (found identical price on Revzilla as well btw). I'm choosing the 120 link because the 106 link is $120+, so I'd save a few bucks cutting it myself, which I've never done before.

All I have to do is put the old/new chain side by side, count the links to a perfect 106 (or 53 since it counts both sides of the plates, right?) and Dremel off the end of the rivet pins and then punch it through with a chain breaker. After quadruple checking the length, I just wrap the newly cut chain onto the sprockets and attach the master link on the end, with the chain breaker tool. If I got this installation process wrong, please advise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update:
Got advice from someone else that said I should get a chain and sprocket kit, since its been 9k miles on the same chain.
So now I'm looking at this chain and sprocket kit, it's $150 and its already cut to proper length and comes with a rivet master link:
Vortex V3 WSS Chain And Sprocket Kit Kawasaki Ninja 300 2014-2017
If anyone has any other suggestions I'm going to go with this as my final answer.
 

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That is fine... but I would still try the simplest first. First chain will not be easy. Get that Chevron Techron Plus add it and do that. one bottle, ride it 50 - 150 miles or so. It wont hurt anything and will rule that out. Might suggest taking a picture of just the chain from the side and post it up.
 

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Before doing a lot of other things, you could check the synch of the carbs. With the throttle closed, and you observing the carb throttle mechanism, slowly open the throttle. You should see both start to move at the same time. If they move independently, one starting while the other sits still, you may want to adjust the cables etc so they start and move in unison. If out of synch, one cylinder is given more throttle than the other, and one of the two will be complaining... being shorted on fuel:air mix and forced to go XXX rpm... etc.
Can't hurt, and takes little time & effort.
You can rotate the rear wheel, in neutral with the wheel elevated, and watch as the links go past. Any that are sticky, as in they are not straight with the following or leading links, you may want to lube the chain and try to free up the sticky links. If you do that, take for a test ride, and it helps, proceed with the replacement. Generally you replace the full set when the teeth on the sprockets are worn, and the chain is sloppy. The teeth when worn will have a slight cup in the side of the teeth where the center roller of the chain has worn when pulling on the sprocket or being pulled by the small sprocket. You will end up with a somewhat triangular tip on the sprocket teeth, that narrows partway down the teeth. If short of cash, and the teeth are not worn, replacing the chain might do the trick. If the teeth are hooked, you likely won't feel any improvement unless the chain links are 'stiff'.
tom
 

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This happens frequently and can fool people into thinking it is engine related: A BAD drive chain with frozen links. Lift the rear wheel and spin it and look for 'kinks.'
Good idea Porky.

Got advice from someone else that said I should get a chain and sprocket kit, since its been 9k miles on the same chain.
But have you checked the chain the way Porky suggested?
A quality, well maintained (lubed) chain should last longer than 9,000 miles...

S F
 
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