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Dumb Mistakes and Motorcycles

6753 Views 68 Replies 28 Participants Last post by  Offcenter
A post in the repair section got me thinking - How many dumb mistakes have I made while on or around a motorcycle? Countless, but here's what come immediately to mind:

Dropped a Goldwing a few years ago when I did a hasty and careless u-turn.

Hooked up an electronic ignition backwards and let the magic smoke out.

Anyone else?
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As long as you were sitting straight up it shouldn't have been too bad.
Made the dumb mistake of down shifting on a wet road, in a curve, once. Normally I've got to do something at least twice before I'm convinced.
Believe it or not, they probably wasn't paying that much attention, if any, to you. It just felt like it...
Lol, I'm pretty sure they saw as they were right next to me and hard to miss anyway since I had a loud can on etc... Anyway it's not the most embarassing thing that's happened to me by a long way so I don't really care.
As long as you were sitting straight up it shouldn't have been too bad.
I was! It could have really only gone bad if there was ice on the road, which thankfully there was not. Just a little silly mistake for the first ride of the season! :)

If tires weren't so expensive I probably would have tried my first burnout that day. lol
When I first got my GS850G I tried to show off to my mum that I'm a skilled rider by doing a spirited takeoff on a green light.

Well...my tyres had more than enough traction for the damp road, but they certainly didn't for the slippery manhole cover I rolled over. The rear tried swapping ends with the front and when they got back onto pavement that started a horrifying tank slapper that was so violent it threw my feet off the pegs. I was certain I was about to be buried under my baby, but I let off the throttle, the bike straightened up, and all was well. Thankfully my mum wasn't watching because she probably would have killed me for that.
DAYUM! what a deal, if the bike didn't do you in, you Mom would have!
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I had to or wanted to change the rear dir. sigs on my sporty to tail-lites an sigs. That worked out well.
I knew what I needed and got it. while wiring I got careless and shorted a long lead draped over the saddle and the wire smoked up and burnt off the insulation and left a mark of resentment across the saddle. yeah I was mad, but I say,
"Hey stuff happens, just make sure it does not happen again. And get on with life and a good ride. . .So at times I am a few pennies short of a whole buck. . .life goes on.
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I put about 1/4 of a tank of Gasoline in my new Dodge Ram 2500, Cummins powered truck, because the BP nozzles were all GREEN:( Absolutely no other fueling station uses green plastic covers for their nozzles. I got about 10 miles away and the fun stopped. My truck and the 25ft Pace trailer had to towed into a Dodge dealer in Gallup, NM, to have the tank drained and the pump system purged! $250 latter and 5 hours shot I was on my way sadder but much wiser for the experience.

Oh well, live and learn,

Sam:)
We make mistakes because we are human, we are smart enough to know it happens to everyone and that there are some who could not ever admit it. As mad as I was for torching a wire on the saddle of my Sporty, I use the exp. to tell others, this is why ya use fuses of the proper size and if I thought of it, I coulda rigged up a fuse so that torch event would not've happened.
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I had already posted on this thread about filling up my motorcycle with diesel fuel, but I think in the interest of safety for our many new members of the forum, I should be open and honest about an even stupider decision I made once, and it almost cost me my life.

Back in 2000 my Kawasaki Concours was my ride and I loved it. But with that big 7.5 gallon gas tank sitting up so high, and with my shorter stature, the bike was a bit of a challenge to handle when the tank was full and the speed was very slow, such as just starting out from a stop. So one day after filling up with gas I started to pull out of the gas station and over I went. But I thought it not a big deal as there didn't seem to be much damage at all other than some paint scrapes to the bike. But a day or so later when I went to slow down, the front brake seemed to lock up and down again I went, albeit at a slow speed in a parking lot. But I guess I was into wishful thinking and this is where I made my biggest mistake in my many years of riding. I should have had the bike towed or trailered to a mechanic to check out the brakes and determine if I had damaged the front brake in that first fall. But instead I just convinced myself that all was okay and that the second fall was my fault and not the fault of the bike. A few days went by, and when out for a ride on a nearby country road, I went to slow down at about 45 mph coming into a curve and the moment I touched the front brake level the front wheel locked and down I went. This time I was injured with several broken ribs and the bike was totaled. The insurance investigator looking at my bike said there was a small piece of gravel wedged into the brake mechanism, something he said he had never seen happen before. I didn't say anything about my previous concerns and the insurance company paid off on the totaled bike. The broken ribs caused a lung to collapse, infection started and a few days later I was near death. I had to undergo a terrible surgery where my lung was cut open from my back and 5 quarts of infected pus was taken out. After 31 days in Intensive Care I was sent home and it took me over two years before I was well enough to ride again.

My mistake, which I urge you riders to not make, is to not ignore a problem with your bike that could end up causing what seemed like a minor wreck but in reality almost killed me. To this day I wonder if I had just had the bike checked out, and possibly repaired, might I have avoided the consequences I later suffered, and bear the scars to this day of that incident. In fact, during the surgery the surgeon had to remove part of my left lung, so in effect, I have diminished lung capacity and will have this issue for the rest of my days. The doc said that it gives me the same limitation as if I have an early case of COPD, and makes me a "high risk" senior citizen during this Covid-19 pandemic.

Don't make my mistake. Check out problems and don't let yourself be fooled by wishful thinking that all is well.
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the most expensive mistake i ever made (literally cost me my bike) was buying gas for my bike instead of condoms.......... im still paying for that one.
ROFLMAO
OMG Vito, I'm glad you pulled through! What an ordeal.
Sam
After my medical nightmare, my wife and grown kids all tried to get me to promise to quit riding but I refused to say 鈥渘ever鈥. I missed a few years of riding, gave up teaching in the MSF, and when I did return to riding it was a scooter for the first couple of years.
I'm glad I've never had a mishap on a motorcycle like all y'all have.

Gotta go replace a cracked throttle grip tube on my 250X. Musta bought it that way new.
My latest mistake was trying to do an "Italian Tuneup" on the GS850G in the wet yesterday. Feels like the carbs may need a little carb cleaner as the engine's running a tad rough, but I tried to blew them out with full throttle action. Forgot that wetness plus full thottle aren't a great combo. Got some nice wheelspin action on a green light :D
Just an hour ago, luckily with the pickup truck, not the bike.....
The rain had just ended so the roads are very wet.
I made a left turn pulling away from a stop sign and I used a little too much right foot.
I was quickly reminded that empty pickup trucks and wet roads are a bad combo.
The rear tires broke loose and it tried to swap ends on me as I made the left turn.
Luckily I was quick with the counter steering and straightened it out before it
came all the way around.
I drove a little slower for the rest of the trip. LOL!!!!
After my medical nightmare, my wife and grown kids all tried to get me to promise to quit riding but I refused to say 鈥渘ever鈥. I missed a few years of riding, gave up teaching in the MSF, and when I did return to riding it was a scooter for the first couple of years.
Hello Vito, been there myself, not as long but when in hospital ICU for a month for a throat surgery, I had a clot and then lost lots of power in right leg. frigging scared shitless. now I have neuropathy and it was almost a year B4 I could ride again. I am glad you say never say 'NEVER. you would never be the same again if you had to give up what you love.
just my opinion, throat job worked out well though.

Ray'sSporty
A few days ago I dropped my bike thinking I put the sidestand on .............. but it was not.
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A few days ago I dropped my bike thinking I put the sidestand on .............. but it was not.
We've all done that a time or two!
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The rear tires broke loose and it tried to swap ends on me as I made the left turn.
I love it when that happens on snow. Doing it on just wet roads would be "practice" for snow conditions. :D :D :D
A few days ago I dropped my bike thinking I put the sidestand on .............. but it was not.
Been there done that. Too many times. Why something so basic can be so easily forgot about can only be head up butt syndrome. At least it has always been the case with me. :( :( :(
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Forgetting to put the sidestand down can also be a sign of real fatigue. Once, at the very end of a very long day of riding, 780 miles and most of it in heavy rain, I pulled into my driveway, stopped at the garage door and got off the bike without putting the side stand down. It happens.
I stopped for gas one time about October inland BC, at about 2030, was quite cold, stopped and simply fell over.
Leaving the side stand down and riding off was also happened from time to time. UK
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