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Yup. I get all I want from the firing range the guy uses here that does canceled carry qualifications. Well that was after he got all he could ever use or sell.:D Plenty for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
That's awesome Cowboy! I was at a gun shop one time and was amazed at how much all those supplies cost. Getting the brass free is a huge savings!
 

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Well you also reuse you it a lot in most cases. Just keep cleaning, polishing and trimming until they split or show signs of over pressure. It a little more than just throwing in some powder and a bullet and prime and you're done. Great winter time hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Well you also reuse you it a lot in most cases. Just keep cleaning, polishing and trimming until they split or show signs of over pressure. It a little more than just throwing in some powder and a bullet and prime and you're done. Great winter time hobby.
Yeah, l would love to learn how to do it someday. I just have so much going on right now l can't imagine taking on anything else
 

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Thanks Eye. Then maybe these are. They sure enough have to look and feel. And on your question about reloading. At one time reloading was the only way you could get most any gun to shoot well was by reloading. It's still tru that you can generally improve how a gun shoots today by reloading but the average hunter or paper target shooter can do just fine with today's manufactured ammo. Somewhere along the line they improved a great deal. I think Dods already mentioned it or someone did, it does require investing it good equipment. But I sorta like the way I did it by getting an entry level rig that requires a signal step operation to reload a signal round. Then you get to see just how many mistakes can be made versus the faster progressive set-ups. I reloaded several years with a single stage Lee(there are others) before I went to a progressive Dillon. The key to each though is NO INTERRUPTIONS. You must have a place where you can be alone and not lose any concentration. It's where I go to get away from the honey-do's and complaints of the day that I couldn't care less about. Pure quiet time just hearing one round a pull on the handle hitting then bin.
Thanks Hog. I like the idea of starting out with a single stage press and learning, although a Lee turret press is also being considered. I don't think I'd have need of a progressive type press.

I'm thinking about it from an economy standpoint.
 

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The turret is a single stage. You just rotate the head which puts a different die into use. It's still one cartage at a time. Great because you make all the adjustments once and you are done until you want to "tweak" a load. If I'm thinking of the right press.
 

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Yeah, that's the one. One of them has an auto advance sort of function if you want to use it. So the turret moves with each stroke, but yeah, it's still what I think of as a single stage press.
 

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The manual advance turret Lee was my second loader. Believe it or not my first was a single die one pull per function thing. Real pain in the butt. The Lee was much much better, In fact I still use it for developing loads if I change powder. Once I find the exact load recipe that I like I then move back to the Dillon and dial it's powder measure in and start pumping them out. So I've kept two die setups, one for each machine in all the calibers I shoot. $30 is better than complete setup each time over and over. The Lee turret makes it easy.

If you never change calibers Dillon make some real nice already setup machines but I think those are just pistol calibers. I sometimes wish I could afford one for each caliber I load. Changing isn't hard but a pain.
 

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It sounds more and more like the Lee would be the way for me to go. Thanks for your input. And as much as I'd like to be able to just crank out rounds, I think flexibility and price are more important. I can't really see a need to "mass produce" rounds. I have the time so going a little slower and making fewer isn't going to hurt me.

I'll likely have a few different main calibers to reload, and maybe even a few archaic rifle rounds if I decide to pursue those.
 

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I use a turret press and it's very convenient to set up all the dies at once and just rotate the head. Of course switching calibers requires setting up the dies again, but it isn't difficult.
 

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I use a turret press and it's very convenient to set up all the dies at once and just rotate the head. Of course switching calibers requires setting up the dies again, but it isn't difficult.
Have any recommendations for one brand of turret press over another?

(And since we're still discussing tooling, of a sort, this isn't technically a thread hi-jack.):)
 

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I use a turret press and it's very convenient to set up all the dies at once and just rotate the head. Of course switching calibers requires setting up the dies again, but it isn't difficult.
You need to get more heads. I have one for ever caliber and it's set of dies. For both my Lee and Dillon. That's like 20 different set-ups but with a change of head and maybe primer holder I'm loading a different caliber in near the blink of an eye.
 

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I use the Lyman T-Mag press, back from when they were bright orange. It can hold 6 dies, so two calibers can be set up at once. An entire set including press, scale, powder measure, case trimmer and assorted do-dads can be found new for under $400. That's about everything you need to get started loading besides the specific dies for each caliber and the actual cartridge components.

Lee is probably the most economical brand and from what I have seen, their stuff works. Truthfully, I see the difference between the brands about the same as Harbor Freight tools vs Craftsman vs Snap-on.

RCBS, Hornady, and Dillon are probably the high-end models.
 

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I was rather surprised that Lee dies were any good but they are. I had always thought they were rebranded RCBS dies but they do look a little different. I agree Lee is about the easiest way in. I was going to sell mine when I got the Dillon but dang, they're just too good to let go cheap and work great for experimenting.
 

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I have a few Lee dies and they work as advertised. I see they are making carbide dies now as well. That's the way to go for handgun cartridges.
 

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Lee handgun dies are good. The rifle dies will never sit on my workbench again. Since I am just a few miles from Hornady, I have started changing out everything else one at a time. I still have good luck with RCBS, but Hornady will fix whatever I have while I wait, best warranty in the business.
 

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Maybe they aren't carbide??? I only have two. Not sure if there is a way to even tell. I guess the instructions would say. I'll check later.
 

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The two sets of rifle dies I had would crush the necks when sizing. I got tired of throwing away good brass. Both did the same thing, both were replaced by Lee, both new ones did the same thing. Switched to Hornady and never had another problem. One set was 06, and the other was 30-30, didn't matter if it was new or used brass, amount of lube, or adjusting them out to just size the neck.

Do like their handgun dies, never have had a problem with them and they work fine in the Hornady progressive.
 
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