Motorcycle Forum banner

21 - 40 of 64 Posts

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
20,012 Posts
Oh boy. Just think of all the new toys in your future.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
You have no idea cowboy! I have become a real tool junkie, one with a serious Ebay problem at that. I have decided that l am deserving of really high quality American made tools...it has been a very expensive decision thus far! That being said, l have gotten to be pretty darn good at snagging deals on Snap-On and Mac tools. I scored a nice 1/2" long Snap-On ratchet the other day for about $60, and a beautiful Mac torque wrench for about the same. And l have been finding sockets for under $5...a lot compared to Craftsman or Husky, but very cheap when it comes to high dollar tools.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,353 Posts
Tools

I still have my stud puller purchased over 50 years ago. Cost $2.80.
Dennis Conner knows about square. When his new Americans Cup boat turned out to be a dud he said " We tried to reinvent the wheel, and we got a square one "

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,871 Posts
I have a mix of hand tools since I buy them based on need and value rather then just name alone. Most of my ratchets, for example, are Snap-On or Matco because they have a particular form or function, or other feature, that I wanted. Most of my sockets are Craftsman because they seem to fit as good as the Snap-On's yet are less expensive and have an easier return policy. (The tool trucks no longer stop at my garage.)

If it's something I'm not going to use often and isn't critical I'll generally try to save some coins. I spent about $8 on a Honda spark plug socket. If it's a critical tool, or something I plan on buying once and keeping forever then I like to get the best I can afford. I spent about $275 on one tool to press the case bearings out of a Harley B model engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
I have a mix of hand tools since I buy them based on need and value rather then just name alone. Most of my ratchets, for example, are Snap-On or Matco because they have a particular form or function, or other feature, that I wanted. Most of my sockets are Craftsman because they seem to fit as good as the Snap-On's yet are less expensive and have an easier return policy. (The tool trucks no longer stop at my garage.)

If it's something I'm not going to use often and isn't critical I'll generally try to save some coins. I spent about $8 on a Honda spark plug socket. If it's a critical tool, or something I plan on buying once and keeping forever then I like to get the best I can afford. I spent about $275 on one tool to press the case bearings out of a Harley B model engine.
I hear ya Eye. Right now l am just assembling a complete set for the first time ever. I have always had some tools, but mainly bits and pieces, this and that. Now that l am really using tools a lot, l am giving it more priority. Along the way l am discovering that l have expensive taste and l am a tool junkie :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Yeah, gotta remember not to buy tools just for the sake of having them. For the most part, though, l don't feel like l can go wrong by buying sockets and wrenches that will last me a lifetime
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
12,318 Posts
Like most people I have to buy a new tool with every new project I start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
Like most people I have to buy a new tool with every new project I start.
Funny you should mention that Critter...l have developed this philosophy that tools are actually free if l am willing to do the work myself. I recently bought a torque wrench and all the stuff needed to change the oil on my bike (I still need to get a lift). It cost me some coin, but in the long run it will pay for itself by doing the work at home instead of taking it to a shop.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,353 Posts
Cost

Funny you should mention that Critter...l have developed this philosophy that tools are actually free if l am willing to do the work myself. I recently bought a torque wrench and all the stuff needed to change the oil on my bike (I still need to get a lift). It cost me some coin, but in the long run it will pay for itself by doing the work at home instead of taking it to a shop.
As an example. The belch mobile needed new brakes after warping the rotors and trashing the other bits. Price to get the shop to do it a lot.
Price to buy a new 2 1/2 ton floor jack, a master cylinder, rotors and calipers, a lot less.
Used the same jack to lift the tractor last week.

I have the same tool box and tools, that I took to the track over fourty years ago.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Female Rider
Joined
·
9,324 Posts
Randy had a lot of tools when we got married (in 1977) considering he was a shade tree mechanic. He worked on all of his own stuff as well as things people asked him to.

He bought specialty tools when needed. Most of his tools were Craftsman but he didn't have complete sets of anything. For several years my dad bought him "sets" of Craftsman tools for Christmas.

I'm not sure but it seems like the tools he had then and the ones my dad bought him were a lot better quality than the Craftsman tools of today. I bought him a few wrenches and sockets for Christmas this year to replace some that were lost over the years. Just the weight of the new tools compared to the old stuff was pretty telling.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
20,012 Posts
There ya go MONI. That's exactly what has happened to Sears in general. I think I've seen better tools in Harbor Freight now even.

Years ago I was buying everything I could including hand tools from a place called Orchard Supply Hardware, OSH. Sears bought them out and suddenly the quality took a nose dive. It even looked like they might go out of business because most everyone stopped going there. We moved so have no idea if they survived as OSH under Sears management or not. But at one time OSH was THE place to get just about anything farm, garden or plumbing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
I went to Sears a couple weeks ago to buy socket rails. While l was waiting for the cashier l noticed that they had like 3 different lines of wrenches...two of them were very different than the traditional Craftsman wrench, they were more like smooth copycats of Snap-On wrenches. I didn't even consider them. They have lost their identity, in my book.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
20,012 Posts
Got a question for you Harley and Snap-On experts. Back in 85 the new Harley I got was delivered with a real nice tool pouch and tools. They looked very much like Snap-On and I had heard rumors they were. Anyone know if back then Harley had a line on good tools. I know they sure don't now but back then it might have been possible. I still have them. Carrying them on my 07 which naturally didn't have any when I got it used. I can't tell but they sure look like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
Yeah, l discovered rotary broaching. There is a machining program at my school and l am going to take some classes once l get my boiler licenses
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,871 Posts
Got a question for you Harley and Snap-On experts. Back in 85 the new Harley I got was delivered with a real nice tool pouch and tools. They looked very much like Snap-On and I had heard rumors they were. Anyone know if back then Harley had a line on good tools. I know they sure don't now but back then it might have been possible. I still have them. Carrying them on my 07 which naturally didn't have any when I got it used. I can't tell but they sure look like it.
I'm neither a Harley nor a Snap-On expert, but I do know Snap-On has made some Harley branded tools over the years, and that there is a connection of some sort between the two companies.

Most of the Harley specific shop tools now are made by Kent Moore.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
20,012 Posts
Thanks Eye. Then maybe these are. They sure enough have to look and feel. And on your question about reloading. At one time reloading was the only way you could get most any gun to shoot well was by reloading. It's still tru that you can generally improve how a gun shoots today by reloading but the average hunter or paper target shooter can do just fine with today's manufactured ammo. Somewhere along the line they improved a great deal. I think Dods already mentioned it or someone did, it does require investing it good equipment. But I sorta like the way I did it by getting an entry level rig that requires a signal step operation to reload a signal round. Then you get to see just how many mistakes can be made versus the faster progressive set-ups. I reloaded several years with a single stage Lee(there are others) before I went to a progressive Dillon. The key to each though is NO INTERRUPTIONS. You must have a place where you can be alone and not lose any concentration. It's where I go to get away from the honey-do's and complaints of the day that I couldn't care less about. Pure quiet time just hearing one round a pull on the handle hitting then bin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
A friend of mine used to reload. I never got into it, but sometimes if we got off work early we would go out to the woods where people would shoot and we would collect 9mm and 40 cal once-fired brass (which is what he reloaded). We were always amazed at how many people would just go fire off a box or two and leave the brass lying there.
 
21 - 40 of 64 Posts
Top