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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, this is maybe a bit off topic, but l am starting to dip my toes into a little bit of machining and fabrication at work, and suddenly l have all kinds of great ideas popping into my head from out of nowhere. It's actually very cool! I know that these things exist, because l saw a youtube video for them...does anyone know who makes this drill bit that can drill a square hole in steel, something like a mortiser bit? While we are at it, please share if you know of any cool tools that do really trick stuff :)
 
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Not sure if this will help you or not but here is a video on Youtube.

Here is where you can purchase the drill bit.

You have to forgive me, I am not a mechanic or fabricator. So this info may be useless. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info guys. I am going to check this out.

Eye, after doing some more looking l found aa rotary broach made by Slater...have you ever used such a machine? It looks like you need a lathe as well.
 

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I would think Plasma cutter. Depending on thickness.
 

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Plasma cutters are neat. I had a friend of mine cut a car in half with one. That will teach the person to only pay for half the work........
 

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Not sure if this will help you or not but here is a video on Youtube.
That's another form of rotary broach, but I've never seen it done quite like that. Thanks for posting. Interesting, but it looks a little complicated and somewhat limited.

Here is where you can purchase the drill bit.
Those are tool bits, like for a lathe. I do wonder how much the above tools would be though.

I've never used a rotary broach, Hawk, but I've seen it done. Usually you use a milling machine or lathe, but a lathe limits the size of the material you can work on. If you're doing production work and making a lot of the same sized holes a rotary broach might be the way to go, but if you need to make a lot of various sized shapes then standard broaches might be more useful.

I use standard broaches. They're relatively cheap, but I always have my eyes open for used ones in sizes I don't have. You can make them, but I haven't had the need to try my hand at doing that yet. The advantage in using standard broaches is you can collect a whole lot of different sizes and shapes for the same amount of money you'd spend on one rotary broach.

To use them you drill a slightly under-sized pilot hole then ram the broach through with a press. If you're cutting a keyway you use a bushing. Here's a video of a guy making a keyway. If you need to make a square hole, or a hex hole, or whatever, the process is about the same, but this will give you an idea how it's done.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRbOux9NfeU
 

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The company that invented that machining process (first used in wood in the 1800's) is a few blocks from my house.
 

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It was called Greenlee Brothers. (You'll notice that their logo is a round "G" in a square frame) The old plant is long closed down and the tool-making business was taken over by Textron. I had a grandfather and an uncle retire from there after many years of working.
 

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Well I'll be! I know that name from electrical tools. I had no idea that's how they started, or that they were that old. Cool info about the logo too. Very interesting. Thanks.
 

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I seem to want to remember something about an older Greenlee line of very good wood chisels and cutting bits too, but I might be confused.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the info guys. I am finding myself very fascinated with the concept l have recently discovered...that with an idea, some raw materials and a few skills, l can make a tool or a part or whatever it is that l need.
 

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It is said that the ability to make and use tools is what separates the higher order of animals from the lower. The same can be said about Bikers. :coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Nice! Now l feel smart too :)

The other day we had a situation at the hospital where there were a cluster of bolts coming through a wall, they were all holding conduits (or something similar) so you couldn't put a socket on it, but they were too close together so you couldn't fit a wrench in between them either. I happened to come across this tool on ebay, it was a snap-on socket extension with a 12-point wrench at the end of it. Perfect! I searched and searched and searched, the seller hadn't posted much info on it, so l didn't have a name or part number...then l realized...it was homemade, and really clean! Whoever made it took a deep socket and cut it at an angle lengthwise almost to the mouth, then sheared it off crossways, but with a slit at the end so you could loop it around the conduit or all-thread or whatever the nut is holding in place. I have seen homemade tools before, but this one was not crude, and its purpose was such that it just caught my attention and filled my imagination with possibilities! I believe that is what started it all.
 

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It's similar to an oxygen/acetylene process. But in this case a electrical arc mixes with gases and pressurized air to melt or cut metal. Much cleaner though. Sorta like a combination of a torch and arc welder I guess.
 

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Plasma cutters are a little cleaner than a cutting torch, but not super precise like a laser cutter. They will cut thicker material than a laser beam, but not as thick as can be cut with a cutting torch.
 
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