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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don’t know what it’s been like for you in your neighborhood, but here in New England, we have had a very wet spring and a wet summer.

I watched a news report yesterday, that was talking about the drought going on on the West Coast, and I feel bad for those folks because we’re getting everybody’s rain here.

Yep, you can wear rain gear and go out and enjoy the weather regardless, but most of the bikers around here because they don’t want to have to clean their bikes, and don’t like riding in the rain, or just going out in between raindrops for a short little trips.

Which begs questions that I will shoot Kaptain Krash’s way (if he is still here).
I used to enjoy his videos about various motorcycle topics, and I would love to revisit that topic, or have him submit a new commentary on “riding in the rain.”

My most significant story about riding in the rain is having gone to a motorcycle rally where my motorcycle Chapter had a tent. We all huddled underneath it for most of the rally, because the weather was terrible, and the rain poured all day!

When 3 o’clock in the afternoon hit and I needed to get home, I knew I was going to have to ride home in the rain. I got on the highway (my only known option) and drove for an hour until I got home.

I was amazed at how stable that motorcycle was as long as I didn’t make any sudden moves! Even in the driving rain.

About every minute or so I had to take my gloved hand up to my faceshield, and wipe it free of rain, like a manual windshield wiper.

When I got home I dumped out 2 inches of rain from my boots and it took two weeks for my leathers to fully dry!

I thank the good Lord I got home safe that day. I guess He had more for me to do, because I was kept safe… But it was a ride I will never forget!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I hope we get lots and lots of freezing rain and not much snow again this winter :cool:
I’d rather have 3 feet or 4 feet of snow than ice
 

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I've ridden full days in the rain and not because I wanted to. I was ok and I don't mind riding in the rain as long as the visibility is good. the downside is I have soft luggage that's not waterproof and I rarely remember to bring covers and then find myself looking for a place to buy garbage bags, but generally, that's too late.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've ridden full days in the rain and not because I wanted to. I was ok and I don't mind riding in the rain as long as the visibility is good. the downside is I have soft luggage that's not waterproof and I rarely remember to bring covers and then find myself looking for a place to buy garbage bags, but generally, that's too late.
I remember doing some river rafting with canoes in years past and putting all of our gear in large garbage bags to keep things dry. I probably would do the same thing in a saddle bag if my bags were prone to penetration by moisture. I hold out a lot of faith in the hard shell bags on touring bikes, to have tight gaskets around the openings, but I think I would still Line the bags with a plastic bag just on the suspicion that the gaskets are not sufficient at highway speed’s to keep rain out.
 

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I remember doing some river rafting with canoes in years past and putting all of our gear in large garbage bags to keep things dry. I probably would do the same thing in a saddle bag if my bags were prone to penetration by moisture. I hold out a lot of faith in the hard shell bags on touring bikes, to have tight gaskets around the openings, but I think I would still Line the bags with a plastic bag just on the suspicion that the gaskets are not sufficient at highway speed’s to keep rain out.
Yeah, my next set of soft luggage will be waterproof. Right now I have Cortech but will be getting Kriega next time.
 

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If you pull a plastic shopping bag over your foot before you slide your riding boots on it keeps your feet dry :geek:

Ice is totally traction when you stud your tires, deep snow slows you down too much and it's hard work riding through snow.
 

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About every minute or so I had to take my gloved hand up to my faceshield, and wipe it free of rain, like a manual windshield wiper.
Not sure what bike you ride, but if your helmet is in the wind, over around 25mph (40kph), if you turn your head slowly from side to side (while looking ahead of course), the wind will clear your visor of the rain drops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh heck yeah! If I was 25 years old again…
My 25-year-old mind still sees me out in the woods on dirt bikes with big knobby tires and having the time of my life! But that ain’t reality

“Ice” these days Is something I avoid falling on
 

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Only thing I don't like about riding in the rain is oil slicks on the road. I don't mind getting wet myself or having the bike get wet, it's just the potential of going down due to oil. I stay out of the center part of the road as much as possible if it's raining but you can still get oil in the "#1" or "#3" lane of the road. Last year in the mid-Atlantic region we had a pretty wet spring and early summer but this spring/summer has been pretty dry...not a drought but definitely not a ton of rain either. Hope it clears up for you and you can get some riding in!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not sure what bike you ride, but if your helmet is in the wind, over around 25mph (40kph), if you turn your head slowly from side to side (while looking ahead of course), the wind will clear your visor of the rain drops.
Sounds like a reasonable option, but the rain was coming down pretty steadily, so whatever rain washes away, gets replaced by new rain.
 

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Riding in the rain: Same approach as dating a shy nervous girl. Think about what you are doing, slow at first, no sudden moves.
" A neat rider is a fleet rider " Jeff Smith. Moto cross world champion and ISDT gold medal winner. UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well said Krusty
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Rain is okay if you have to. Rain and Fog now that is a totally different subject.
 
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Rain is okay if you have to. Rain and Fog now that is a totally different subject.
Misty rain, fog, mountain road, and deer about. I parked it one night around 2100. Put my small tent up and went snoozy. Rustling outside during the night. I was too afraid, cautious, not brave enough, to look. Probably a huge grizzly bear, but maybe a coyote, or raccoons, or deer. UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
“Riding in the rain: Same approach as dating a shy nervous girl. Think about what you are doing, slow at first, no sudden moves…….”
Interesting analogy!
 

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Sometimes you get caught in the rain and have to endure it, but I almost never leave the garage if its already raining or seems highly likely to rain. In addition to oil slicks which may become invisible, potholes can appear as puddles and can be very dangerous (a fellow MSF Instructor back in the early 90's was killed that way). But the biggest danger is the greatly reduced ability of the cars and trucks around you to see you and not hit you. As a rider in the rain our visibility is reduced markedly, and we might tend to forget that already distracted car drivers will be even less likely to see and avoid us.

But one positive aspect of riding in the rain may be how it can actually increase the confidence of new riders. When I first started riding in the early 1980's I went for a group ride sponsored by the dealer where I bought the bike without even thinking about the fact that I did not know any other of the riders nor how they rode. This was before GPS devices and I was just following the bike in front of me and totally lost had I needed to navigate on my own. I had never ridden in heavy rain and avoided doing so like the plague. But on this group ride the rain started and got heavier and heavier and the riders in front of me did not end the ride, but barely slowed down the pace. Much to my pleasant surprise my bike rode perfectly, more than capable despite the rain, big puddles, etc. and gave me confidence for riding in the rain from there on.
 
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You might not believe it but another positive about rain is if you do slip and lay the bike down you slide much easier so get much less road rash. Yep, I found that out the hard way. Hard packed dirt is now mud so there's a softer landing there too. Yep, found out the hard way. And I still ride in the rain if I need to.
 
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You might not believe it but another positive about rain is if you do slip and lay the bike down you slide much easier so get much less road rash. Yep, I found that out the hard way. Hard packed dirt is now mud so there's a softer landing there too. Yep, found out the hard way. And I still ride in the rain if I need to.

'easier and softer' are relative terms :)
 
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