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Do you think 600 cc is too much for a first time rider?

10474 Views 66 Replies 43 Participants Last post by  ethan102787
basically i want a sports bike, i have no riding experience and i wanted to get the ninja 250 but its too weak if i wanted to carry another passenger and the ninja 500r is too ugly so i wanted to know if a 600 cc bike is too much for a new rider?
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depends on how u feel

for my 1st bike, i got 1-year old 600cc r6...
it took me about 2 months (i m a weekend rider though) to learn to ride this thing. note i was careful and it was boring to go slow on the crotch rocket. also, the spotbike riding position is challenging and takes time b4 u r comfortable (if ever :).... so take all the things in account
1. be responsible
2. allow time to learn (sportbike will take more time to learn than a regular bike like ninja 250/500)
3. have cash

i m sure there are other points to consider, so weigh everything up....
good luck in making your choice
I learned to ride on an 01 GSXR 600. They are not too much to learn on. You need to have discipline as GeorgeRe said. If you don't have respect for the power and the discipline to stay controlled. I wouldn't recommend it.
well i started out on my dads 95' harley soft tale but my 1st bike was a 2002 cbr600. and its pretty easy, know that the bike has lots of power and if u hit the gas u go fast...so just get used to it and u will get the hang of it
Absolutely not.

As long as you use your head, nothing is too much to learn on.
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I don't think so. I got my '07 R6 as my first bike and so far it has been a breeze to learn on, I just never really got into the power for about the first 400 miles or so until i got quite comfortable on it.
It麓s doable if you use caution, but I certainly wouldn麓t recommend it. I plan to buy the Ninja 250R as my first bike before moving up to a GSX-R 750. I don麓t think you麓ll find it 麓weak.麓

Having a less powerful bike can be helpful because it allows you to go harder on the throttle and learn to control a bike near its limit rather than putting around to avoid losing control on a more powerful bike.

Just my opinion. It麓s your call.
It麓s doable if you use caution, but I certainly wouldn麓t recommend it. I plan to buy the Ninja 250R as my first bike before moving up to a GSX-R 750. I don麓t think you麓ll find it 麓weak.麓

Having a less powerful bike can be helpful because it allows you to go harder on the throttle and learn to control a bike near its limit rather than putting around to avoid losing control on a more powerful bike.

Just my opinion. It麓s your call.
i learned on a cbr600rr and i definitely don't think it was too much to learn on. its a basic fact that 90% of riders do not use their 600cc bikes to its full potential. Most riders (excluding racers) would not really use anything to its full potential. I really don't see a point in getting a 250 to learn on and then spending more money to buy a 600cc bike. you mine as well take the time you would have spent on the 250 and just take is slow on the 600. at least this way you will be able to get used to the feel of your bike. As long as your responsible then there is no problem.
You're fine

I started on an 800, and I think it made me a better rider, I had to learn control early.
I am getting ready to start out on my first bike which is a 750 honda shadow spirit. I am going to take the MSF course on July 19th. 600 should be a breeze.

Lisa
G
I am getting ready to start out on my first bike which is a 750 honda shadow spirit. I am going to take the MSF course on July 19th. 600 should be a breeze.

Lisa
He's talking about a sportbike, not a cruiser, world of difference there.

In my opinion yes the new 600's are too powerful for a beginner

I've explained why countless times but I'm tired and don't feel like re writing why so here's someone else's explanation

http://www.motorcycleforum.com/showthread.php?p=474358#post474358
That麓s a good explanation. I said above that I think 600cc is too much.

Of course some disagree, so let me just add that I really don麓t have as much of a problem with the idea of a 600 as the guy who wrote that explanation.

My friend learned on a Honda CBR600RR and he never even came close to crashing.

It麓s certainly possible, and possible safe. I麓m just saying it麓s not the BEST choice and it麓s not what I would do.
it's one thing to get on a 600, ride it on the slab and not crash it. anyone can do that if they tried. anyone can get on the freeway at 2am and wring the throttle and not roll off til they hit 145 mph and say they're "fast"

it's a totally different thing, however, to get on a 354 lb, 120bhp 600cc supersport and really learn how to ride it, as God intended. There are things that these bikes will NEVER be good at teaching you--things like conserving momentum, proper braking, and all of the little things that you should learn on a bike that's 30lbs heavy and 40 hp short. Instead of becoming a better rider, a faster, smoother rider--you become someone who merely knows how to jam on the brakes, and twist the throttle, one of many who will never reach their potential to be "fast."

which i guess is fitting in the current world of sportbikes--all starbucks and no passion for real riding. 150 mph top speed runs and 1200 dollar reckless driving tickets--but can't go to the track b/c it's "too expensive."

you can start out on a 600 (i did, albeit it was a 93 F2) and eventually become fast--but do i think i would be a better rider if i spent 6-12 months on a 250r? you betcha.
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My Son learned on a supersport, the Ninja ZX6R.
Hey Skittles....what did you wind up getting?
Well- if u are mature enough to handel the power its easy and i would definitly recommend it. I come from driving a stick shift. I have riddin my friends ZX10r bike which i dropped a couple of times.. but that was a very very heavy bike. I can see how driving a 600cc would be difficult if u do not have the knowledge of the manuel transmission down.. but it was easy for me. . I drive a 2001 R6 and it is one hell of a ride. :)
the first street bike i ever rode was my buddies rc51. First time ever on a street bike. Scared the **** out of me but learned how to control it very quiclkly. But my first bike which i just got is a vf750f honda. I cant wait
it's one thing to get on a 600, ride it on the slab and not crash it. anyone can do that if they tried. anyone can get on the freeway at 2am and wring the throttle and not roll off til they hit 145 mph and say they're "fast"

it's a totally different thing, however, to get on a 354 lb, 120bhp 600cc supersport and really learn how to ride it, as God intended. There are things that these bikes will NEVER be good at teaching you--things like conserving momentum, proper braking, and all of the little things that you should learn on a bike that's 30lbs heavy and 40 hp short. Instead of becoming a better rider, a faster, smoother rider--you become someone who merely knows how to jam on the brakes, and twist the throttle, one of many who will never reach their potential to be "fast."

which i guess is fitting in the current world of sportbikes--all starbucks and no passion for real riding. 150 mph top speed runs and 1200 dollar reckless driving tickets--but can't go to the track b/c it's "too expensive."

you can start out on a 600 (i did, albeit it was a 93 F2) and eventually become fast--but do i think i would be a better rider if i spent 6-12 months on a 250r? you betcha.
I totally agree. Well put.
354 lb, 120bhp 600cc supersport
That some scary sh!%. To think in my days the idea bike to learn on was a 45-50 horse 2 cylinder 650 yamaha or triumph. If I would of started out on 120 horses I wouldn't be typing this right now.:eek:
Take in whatever these guys say to you, but also know yourself. If you feel you can handle a big bike go for it, but if your shady about it or feel you will take advantage i suggest you dont. I learned on a 650 gsx and i remember everyday im still learning 1300 miles yes but thats nothing compared to 90% of the poeple who ride. respect it but enjoy yourself, be safe and remember any bike you ride can kill you if you dont respect it. its all about the clutch and how hard you are on the throttle.
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