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2021 CanAm Spyder RT
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Discovering a road that is new to me, and fun to ride, is a great part of motorcycling. Its easy to find "new" roads when away from home, but yesterday I found such a road only 30 minutes from where I live and where I thought I had ridden all of the local paved roads. I went for a ride with no destination in mind, other than heading north on the Interstate with the intention of taking an exit that I had not used previously. I didn't have to go far, and I knew from the past that this exit was not into an urban area. I ended up on a nice state road, two lanes, perfectly paved, that meandered through some rolling hills, nice sweepers, and beautiful green countryside. About 30 minutes on this road it led into a familiar road, but then diverted again and for about another 30 minutes where it ended at a small city where one of my favorite restaurants is located. So it was a 90 minute or so ride, followed by a great lunch, followed by a 90 minute ride home on my usual route to and from that small city. What a great way to spend a beautiful summer day on my Goldwing. And now I just might get my wife to ride with me again, at least to see this "new" road, despite her back issues which have kept her off the passenger seat for most of this riding season. I'm old, but life is good.
 

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Even old, familiar roads can become 'new' again, Vito. I agree that a new road is fun and exciting, but I also enjoy getting on a road that I can ride almost blindfolded, slow down, get in a nice comfortable groove, and just enjoy the ride. And before you jump down my throat, I'll be doing the same thing you just did, this Fall. A small group of us will be heading South to the Canyon Land area of Utah, and run the Hog Back (Hwy 12) from Zion east thru Bryce and Capitol Reef. Should be a great ride and I'm really looking forward to it.
Having no destination IS one of the best parts of motorcycling, just don't forget the old roads. There is always something there that you may have overlooked.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Old roads ridden the opposite direction you normally ride them become new roads instantly. Things just look different for some reason. But yes, just getting onto any road you haven't ridden before can turn into a gem. Unfortunately here in Texas that road might turn to gravel in short order. But I try ever darn road I haven't tried. Sometimes I discover I blew it and had ridden it. But it's still fun trying. I do worry that the gravel roads I get on just ups my chance of ruining mt drve belt though.:sad:
 

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One of my favorite things to do when I have a few hours to kill is to pick a road I've never ridden and see where it goes, making random turns when the mood strikes me, Basically just a general direction and see where the day takes me. I've found some awesome roads doing this.
 

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On The Road Again!
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One of my favorite things to do when I have a few hours to kill is to pick a road I've never ridden and see where it goes, making random turns when the mood strikes me, Basically just a general direction and see where the day takes me. I've found some awesome roads doing this.
Absolutely! If I come to a corner and the road to the right looks familiar, I'll turn left to see where it goes. I find some great places to ride to that way.
 

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I recently broke down and bought a TomTom Rider 550. I had a small package to drop off at the UPS store, and I decided hey, why not go to the UPS store in Hudson NY (I'm in northwest Connecticut). It took me on so many great new roads that I haven't bothered to visit. I know it's sort of cheating, but I love the discovery function while still knowing approximately where I'm going to end up. In this part of the country "going north" isn't quite so easy as it sounds.
 

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I used to have a Garmin GPS mounted on my bike(s). I didn't use it much while out riding places I hadn't been before, I used it to find my way home. :)

Don't use a GPS anymore, seemed like they broke down too often on the bike. Of course I was using the cheapest GPS from Wal-Mart that I could find, and they were made for cars. Since retiring, don't have the money to get a new one each time the old one quits.
 

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I used to have a Garmin GPS mounted on my bike(s). I didn't use it much while out riding places I hadn't been before, I used it to find my way home. :)

Don't use a GPS anymore, seemed like they broke down too often on the bike. Of course I was using the cheapest GPS from Wal-Mart that I could find, and they were made for cars. Since retiring, don't have the money to get a new one each time the old one quits.

These days, you don't need an expensive GPS. You just need a smart phone. There is a maps app on most smart phones that can get you home (As long as you have service). There are plenty of GPS type apps like Rever and InRoute that you can use for that as well. You just need a phone mount. I use InRoute because I can map a ride and it works even if I have no cell service and I can get turn by turn directions using my blue tooth helmet.
 

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Zip
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These days, you don't need an expensive GPS. You just need a smart phone. There is a maps app on most smart phones that can get you home (As long as you have service). There are plenty of GPS type apps like Rever and InRoute that you can use for that as well. You just need a phone mount. I use InRoute because I can map a ride and it works even if I have no cell service and I can get turn by turn directions using my blue tooth helmet.
Even Google Maps lets you download a map to your phone; later on when you're out of cell service range it will still provide directions. I use this feature whenever I'm going to Canada, where my AT&T data plan costs me $10/day.
 

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One of my favorite things to do when I have a few hours to kill is to pick a road I've never ridden and see where it goes, making random turns when the mood strikes me, Basically just a general direction and see where the day takes me. I've found some awesome roads doing this.
I hear ya -- Some years back I used to have a Saturday night ride 2-3 times a month – usually left around midnight+/- and would just follow 4-lane or interstate until dawn – then find a greasy-spoon (name-brand fast-food not allowed), have breakfast and drag out the map, and plot a 2-lane road back home… have never used GPS on a bike, so didn’t have that aide – but got to see a lot of mid Atlantic coastal states that way… (one of the good reason to have lots of light on the bike…)
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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Sometimes, to truly experience a road you need to stop to check it out. I woke up early Saturday morning. So I took my time meeting the guys at our usual pre ride meeting place. As I was killing time zig zagging on some local county roads, I stopped at an old metal bridge that I had always wanted to stop and check out. A local resident stopped to see If I needed assistance. We chatted for a while, I mentioned I like old bridges, barns, churches, etc. He said I should make two rights and then a left and I would be rewarded with an old arched 1880's train trestle. It's twenty minutes from my home but I would have never have known had I not stopped to experience it.
 

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These days, you don't need an expensive GPS. You just need a smart phone. There is a maps app on most smart phones that can get you home (As long as you have service). There are plenty of GPS type apps like Rever and InRoute that you can use for that as well. You just need a phone mount. I use InRoute because I can map a ride and it works even if I have no cell service and I can get turn by turn directions using my blue tooth helmet.
You absolutely don't need a dedicated unit, that's for certain. I tried a number of moto-specific apps and found both Calimoto and Scenic pretty impressive. Scenic is the only app that had offline maps that I could reliably access, and that did motorcycle friendly routing, but it's still $60/year for the subscription. Google maps misses some things that are very important to me, such as moto-routing and tracking. I sometimes just turn on the GPS, set it to record, and go out and explore. The phone-based solutions are getting expensive, so the $400 I spent on the TomTom is not as scary as it seemed with the annual price for the various apps was only around twenty bucks. Also, I hate having to have my phone locked in a waterproof case. It's such a pain to unpackage the thing if I want to pull it out, I have to remove my gloves to push the buttons, and the screen will often shut off when I'm riding because the phone starts to overheat. I think there's still a use for a GPS unit built for motorcycles, but they sure aren't cheap.
 

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I have enjoyed my "GET LOST" rides for at least 50 years!:grin:

I fill my bike up and ride out and purposely try to 'get lost' going deep into the rural country and seeing lots of new things.:smile_big:

My 'magnetic' sense of direction is uncanny and I rarely get turned around but when I do, I have a compass in my iPhone:plain:

I stop a lot on these rides and take lots of pictures of old barns, which has been a long time hobby. Old Farm buildings, antique farm implements, Cows, horses, sheep and goats, Eagles, hawks, turtles, frogs and snakes all deserve a few pictures.:wink2:

Eventually, I will cross a road I recognize and work my way home----after having a fabulous Ozark breakfast at some greasy spoon:grin:

Usually my get lost rides average +-200 miles total:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
 

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Many of the roads in Texas turn to gravel. But I still try to get lost as well and have seen things most folks will never see as they don't want to get that shiny bike or car dirty. It is risky as getting a rock in the drive belt could be a day ending problem. But I still do it. You just never know what you might see. It's truly adventurous.:smile:
 
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One of my favorite things to do when I have a few hours to kill is to pick a road I've never ridden and see where it goes, making random turns when the mood strikes me, Basically just a general direction and see where the day takes me. I've found some awesome roads doing this.
Years ago, I had a job that required car trips all over the state. I bought a map, and a yellow highlighter, and decided to try and drive as many roads as possible...12 years later, about 1/4 of the map is yellow highlighter (you don't realize how many roads there are until you try to drive them all).

Way out in the middle of nowhere, on an old, "minimal maintenance" road, there was a farmhouse and this guy had a "Lumber for Sale" sign out by the road. He listed what he had on hand "Oak, Cherry, Walnut, Hickory, etc.". His workshop door was open and I could see activity, so I used my lunch hour to stop in and see his operation; I made a friend that day. This was a hobby business for him...In his "spare time" (in his 70's), he took a chain saw out to a patch of trees on his property, chopped one down, sliced it up on the spot with a mobile sawmill, hauled it back, stacked it in a homemade drier, dried it, then cut/planed it into to usable wood shop lumber....like a true farmer, all of his equipment was old and HEAVY DUTY...he had a 12" planer from the 1950's and an even older table saw that could handle a 16" blade along with a 36" surfacer!....wow!...what a dream life.

As for new roads on the cycle. We had 5" of rain in less than an hour, local news reported the torrent of water tore up a road whose name I new but had never been down...after they repaired the road, I rode it. It ran parallel to, and in between, a major road, and a creek, for about 4 miles...driving down that road, you'd never know you were in the city...quiet, large trees, creek, and it runs under a highway bridge at one point ending in a wooded area that then forces you back to the main road which is always packed with cars...I never knew...it was literally a traffic free, with only 1 stop sign the whole length, beautiful way to bypass an insanely busy street with multiple stop lights.
 
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