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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So for those who haven’t read my introduction, I’m brand new to riding, bought a brand new 650. Well I just low sided a brand new 650. Just a dumb rookie mistake and I’m so disappointed in myself. I Didn’t look into the curve and didn’t correct myself, I didn’t slow down enough, I got nervous tried to slow down and decided to hit the grass...hit a bump I couldn’t see wasn’t standing on the pegs bike came out from under me and I hit pavement. I’m glad I got dropping the bike out of the way but I’m upset it was such a dumb rookie mistake. I was in my gear but that was pretty upsetting. To top it off, I think I bent the handlebars...uuugh...idk what to do...I have a MSC tonight, haha. Go figure...the bike has a dent in the gas tank, bent handlebars and scrapes...And all I say is it’s all my fault.
 

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GreyRider, sorry to hear of your mishap. Almost everyone does something that they wish they could get a "do over" and make it right. No injury, except to ego. The scars on the bike can be repaired. Or, the damage can be liver with and act as a reminder. Errors happen quickly and generally without warning. It sounds as though you have analyzed what happened and got it figured out. I'm glad you weren't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, man. I’m just angry with myself. I was close to home and was riding with more feeling than thought. I wasn’t excessively speeding, in fact it was a 30MPH curve on a 45MPH road and I was doing maybe 40MPH. I overestimated myself and my practice hasn’t been ingrained into me yet. I’m definitely not one with the bike. I realized I was coming in over my skill limit decided to bail the turn and fixated. I really set myself up to crash...poor judgement...ugh, well I’m off to my safety course with a tiny bit of road rash hope the instructors don’t notice and make me feel a fool, lol.
 

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Bike will go where you look regardless of the speed to a certain extent. Learn from your mistake. As the say $H!T happens. You are okay and that is what matters.
 

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’m just angry with myself. I was close to home and was riding with more feeling than thought...
Being hard on yourself is a good thing in this instance, as well as analyzing exactly what happened. You will continue to make mistakes (ask me how I know! :smile_big:) and as long as you learn from them, you will improve. I've been in corners more than a few times and realized that an oncoming car was in my lane or, conversely, I'm in their lane or I overcooked the turn, etc.

As long as you leave yourself 15-20% leeway, relax (that's the hard part for me), and trust the bike, you are almost always going to come out okay!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
’m just angry with myself. I was close to home and was riding with more feeling than thought...
Being hard on yourself is a good thing in this instance, as well as analyzing exactly what happened. You will continue to make mistakes (ask me how I know!
) and as long as you learn from them, you will improve. I've been in corners more than a few times and realized that an oncoming car was in my lane or, conversely, I'm in their lane or I overcooked the turn, etc.

As long as you leave yourself 15-20% leeway, relax (that's the hard part for me), and trust the bike, you are almost always going to come out okay!
Trust the inanimate object between my legs that can’t even hold itself upright without my input...easier said than done. Lol. I tried to trust it when I hit the ditch and it left me, lol. I really want to ride but I don’t want to pay to have the damn thing fixed. I broke the mirror off trying to bend it back into place. The bars are bent as well as gas tank. The rest is mostly just scratched but really depressing...I’m an idiot that didn’t listen to good reason about getting a used bike and something with less power. Now I’m stuck with a scratched banged up bike. I’m gonna go wallow in self pity for a few weeks or months. I’m going to get the MC endorsement because that was my goal but I don’t know what I’ll do afterwards. A MC endorsement is basically a money scandal that doesn’t even mean that you can ride in anything other than an empty parking lot. I feel like I got the shaft but mostly it’s my fault for going against good advice.
 

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--

So let's see. You can, one, blame the whole thing on improper gear/bike/roadway or someone not making you get more training before you got out there.

Two, you can be real angry with yourself and beat yourself up for the next week, or month, or year. And then how will you feel after all that punishment? Suddenly real happy?

Three, you can figure out what happened and figure out several ways to do it better the next time. There will be a next time in the same situation--believe it. Use this as a learning lesson.

Keep in mind that the cost of repairs and lost pristine condition are going to be the same for the bike no matter which one of the above you choose. So that's not even a factor.

--
 

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Bike will go where you look regardless of the speed to a certain extent. Learn from your mistake. As the say $H!T happens. You are okay and that is what matters.
You know what else they say? Education is expensive. Sometimes painfully expensive. Get up, brush yourself off and learn from this educational round. Learn to trust counter-steering, leaning more and those tires with those little bitty contact patches. Somehow it all comes together to work. Learn how well on every corner you have to take for awhile by counter-steering and leaning more even when you got the corner well under control. Just do it and see how much more you can do. It really is eye opening. :thumbsup:
 

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Go figure...the bike has a dent in the gas tank, bent handlebars and scrapes...And all I say is it’s all my fault.


Well you are definitely not in denial of what happened .. Instead of beating yourself up now, just say 2 simple words .. I Learned ..
 

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I feel like I got the shaft but mostly it’s my fault for going against good advice.
I hear you and I have been there and, most likely, will be there again. Nothing wrong with taking some time to reassess and only you can decide what, ultimately, is best for you.

I will share that my most recent incident involved a serious ticket for doing something seriously stupid AFTER I had just told myself, "Dude. Don't do anything stupid." I was making myself sick thinking about what an idiot I had been and strongly considered putting my bike up for sale and going back to a 'starter' bike. Mandatory court appearance and increased insurance rates because of 5 seconds of stupid...

Anyway, give it some time and do what is best for you!
 
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Rider "Fixation," can be a big problem and is hard to overcome.

I'm glad that YOU are okay and I'm sure you've learned from the experience.

Sam:nerd:
 

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Hey, I am sorry to hear your brand new bike is banged up. I am no psychologist by any means, but I feel you are beating yourself up really badly.... You made an error in judgement based on lack of experience as I see it.
We have all done that, although not all have messed up our bikes. However, I have done both....

With many years of riding experience I took a curve a bit too fast. The curve had a diminishing radius about halfway through and I felt uncomfortable about that and I chose to go off the road on the left side of the bike...There was grass there and it was springtime and the ground was not hard. As soon as I hit the grass the rear end kicked out and down I went....The bike was badly scratched. At that time I was probably about 76 years or so old. I could not pick it up, as it was a large Kawasaki touring bike. Within five minutes a young man came along in a car and stopped and got me back on two wheels...


Again, I can empathize with messing up a brand new bike. No one can undo an accident, but it isn't going to help you get more skilled in riding by berating yourself.


Looking at the bright side, the experience of messing up your bike may very well give you with an intense desire to become more skilled and fuel your actions. (And by the time you are my age, 83 at present, you won't be able to remember it.)


I thank God you were not hurt. Please give yourself a break.


Grace + peace, Old Bob in North Carolina
 

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I don’t really have anything new to add that hasn’t been said above. I made an error almost two months ago and had a similar result. I was going 30’ish in a curve and I think I got too aggressive in the leave and spun out. I ended up bending my handlebars and scraping up my bike, not to mention my knees and hand. I also hurt my rib.

I probably felt similar to you do now. I was embarrassed and mad at myself. And, due to my injury, I thought I was done with bikes. It took a few weeks to heal physically and mentally. I didn’t see it right after it happened (I was too mad) but afterwards, I thought hard about what I did wrong and used it as a learning experience.

Don’t beat yourself up about it. A new handlebar isn’t a big deal. Just learn from what happened and ride safe.
 

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Bunch of us have been there, done that. Maybe not always with a new bike but often with a new to us bike, which can be just about as bad. I'm 64 and I'm sure I can't remember all the get-offs I've done. Broke my back once, got toes that won't straighten out any more and have been laid up for months thinking about the stupid mistake(s) I made.
Nobody can say anything that will suddenly make you feel better, but you might take a little bit of comfort knowing you're not the only one this has ever happened to.
 

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GreyRider,

I'm so sorry you had this mishap and have damage on your new bike.
Everyone who reads your story can probably identify with the internal pain you're going through right now.
We probably have more compassion for you than you have for yourself.
Stop beating yourself up. Have a good cry and let it go.

Just look around at how few people can actually ride a motorcycle.
That's because it is no easy thing. It's actually pretty complicated.
It's a strange mix of the inflexible laws of physics and fluctuating human emotions.
You are in a select few that stepped up to the challenge.
You'll get past this. Take your time. Hit the reset button and don't give up.
Everyone of us that has been down is rooting for you.
 

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Well, at least you're only describing the damage to the bike...that is emotionally painful to see/fix...but far better than a cast on your leg!

When I was 14, I jumped on a bike that was WAY out of my league...2 to 3x more powerful than anything I'd ever ridden...I hit a series of potholes at low speed which caused me to accidentally twist the throttle and the bike nearly left without me...seriously, I almost lost my grip on the bars and slide off the back when that thing took off; what saved me was years of riding dirt bikes (and losing them).

Lesson learned and you got a crash out of the way...the first/early ones are the most dangerous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well guys and gals than you for all your condolences. I ordered new handle bars and I’m looking to get a new bracket to fix my mirror. Until then I was so unhappy with being able to ride I’ve been sitting on the bike when I get home off work and staring at the handlebars...got upset enough and decided to bend the back with my bare hands, lol...and it worked! So I’ll be riding again! I also passed my MSC and I’m going to get my endorsement next week! So I’m pretty excited again. I’ve chalked it up to a lesson learned!
 

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Glad you are ok. Everyone on this forum has come into a curve too fast and had that choice to make. It takes time and experience to learn to trust that the bike can lean further into the turn and not go down. My advice: Practice, practice, practice taking curves using the proper techniques. Eventually it will become second nature to you. No get that bike fixed and get back in the saddle!!!
 

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So for those who haven’t read my introduction, I’m brand new to riding, bought a brand new 650. Well I just low sided a brand new 650. Just a dumb rookie mistake and I’m so disappointed in myself. I Didn’t look into the curve and didn’t correct myself, I didn’t slow down enough, I got nervous tried to slow down and decided to hit the grass...hit a bump I couldn’t see wasn’t standing on the pegs bike came out from under me and I hit pavement. I’m glad I got dropping the bike out of the way but I’m upset it was such a dumb rookie mistake. I was in my gear but that was pretty upsetting. To top it off, I think I bent the handlebars...uuugh...idk what to do...I have a MSC tonight, haha. Go figure...the bike has a dent in the gas tank, bent handlebars and scrapes...And all I say is it’s all my fault.


We all make mistakes it happens now you know to judge your speed better when in doubt always pull in the clutch in


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Waaaay back when I was young, I went into a curve too fast in a residential neighborhood near home.
All of the streets there had concrete curbs.
Hitting one of those would have been bad.
But I lucked out. I managed to go into one driveway opening in the curb, down the sidewalk and out the next driveway.
I got away with it, but I never forgot it.
That could have been a bad crash.
 
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